Lupus is a rare condition, but it can be a very difficult one. When you suffer from lupus, more than one of your organs may be affected. There are three lupus types that one can suffer from: systemic, discoid and lupus induced by drugs.

Lupus is a chronic inflammtory disease which affects both women and men, (especially women) and usually occurs on different parts of the body, such as skin, blood, joints. As we know, the body systems produces antibodies which have the role to fight against bacteria and viruses. In addition, lupus appears when the body system stops to work properly and produces antibodies known as auto-antibodies causing inflammation and pain.

There are four forms of Lupus: Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus, Drug-Induced Lupus Erythematosus, and Neonatal Lupus. When people discuss lupus, they are usually referring to Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. However, lupus in any form is an autoimmune disease.

When dealing with an anti-inflammatory disease such as lupus, it is extremely important you use your first line of defence, the nutrients from food, to support your body's ability to avoid flares and promote healing. Although doctors say that there is no lupus cure, it simply isn't the case. Not only have I completely healed (and tested negative) for lupus, others have as well. The best news is that many of us healed in different ways, one of which is through a lupus diet.

Our immune system is programmed to protect our bodies from foreign invaders that will do us harm such as germs, bacteria, and viruses. As soon as the immune system senses the presence of an invader, it produces antibodies to destroy it. However, in the case of an autoimmune disease, the immune system fails to distinguish between the cells of our body and a foreign invader and attacks our body cells.

Systemic Lupus Erythematosus, (SLE), the most common type of lupus, has a pronounced polyvalent character. The systemic form of lupus can affect multiple parts of the body and cause a wide variety of unspecific symptoms, ranging from mild to severe. Despite the fact that SLE commonly affects people with ages between 15 and 40, it can also affect the very young or the elderly. Systemic lupus is considered a highly problematic disease, being difficult to diagnose and often requiring ongoing combination treatments.

Lupus is a disease in which patients have good days and bad days. Some days your symptoms are worse and you feel ill; other days the symptoms are not as bad and you feel better. It is not a contagious disease in that it can be transmitted by contact however there is some evidence to indicate heredity may play a role. Lupus is extremely difficult to diagnose.

Lupus is a complex autoimmune disease that generates a wide variety of symptoms. The symptoms produced by lupus may range from mild to severe and generally occur in flares, unpredictably aggravating or ameliorating over time. Some of the common symptoms of lupus are: pronounced fatigue, pain and swelling of the joints, skin rashes and fever. At skin level, lupus often causes the occurrence of the “butterfly rash”, which appears across the nose and cheeks. Although the butterfly rash is the most common rash characteristic to lupus, the disease can cause many other different types of rashes located in various regions of the body: face and ears, scalp, neck, arms, shoulders, hands, chest and back.

The medical profession refers to lupus as “the great imitator” because its symptoms are the same as is present in many other illnesses. The symptoms are also vague and intermittent. And they vary according to the part of the body that is under attack.

In simple words Lupus is generally defined as a breakdown of the immune system in which the body just literally harms itself, destroying its own healthy cells and tissues. The immune system produces harmful antibodies that cause inflammation and tissue damage to the skin, joints, blood vessels, kidneys, lungs, heart, and brain.

Lupus is a disease that can further lead to a number of serious problems. For instance, women suffering from lupus become more prone to heart attacks, strokes, high blood pressure, diabetes, joint and muscle pains. Furthermore, lupus in women can also lead to weakening of bones and emergence of diseases like osteoporosis. So fatigue and pains are obviously most prominent problems induced in lupus patients.

The treatment of lupus greatly differs from a patient to another, lupus sufferers receiving a certain type of medications according to their experienced symptoms and the seriousness of the disease. Thus, the treatment of lupus is often personalized, comprising many different types of medications and therapies. Lupus patients (especially patients diagnosed with systemic lupus erythematosus) are commonly administered combination treatments, targeted at countering the occurrence and aggravation of the multitude of symptoms characteristic to this type of autoimmune disease.

Systemic lupus erythematosus is a common autoimmune chronic disease. The disease causes the immune system to attack the healthy blood cells and tissues instead of malign external infectious organisms. People with systemic lupus erythematosus suffer from many disorders associated with the abnormal activity of the immune system. Patients with severe forms of lupus can also suffer from diseases of the internal organs (heart, lungs, kidneys, liver), musculoskeletal disorders (arthritis, osteoporosis), skin disorders (lupus rash) and diseases of the nervous system. People with lupus may have different symptoms and they can experience them at various intensities.

Inflammation of the kidneys (nephritis) can impair their ability to get rid of waste products and other toxins from the body effectively. Because the kidneys are so important to overall health, lupus affecting the kidneys generally requires intensive drug treatment to prevent permanent damage. There is usually no pain associated with kidney involvement, although some patients may notice that their ankles swell. Most often the only indication of kidney disease is an abnormal urine or blood test.


8 thoughts on “Butterfly Rash Lupus Pictures

  1. The One

    Lupus Rash or other type of rash?
    Is there any other condition that causes a rash around the sides of the nose?

    I had this during the summer, it would get worse when i was outside in the sun, one day when I went to the pool it was really really noticeable. I always have a redness around the nose, I have seen pictures of the butterfly rash from Lupus and it seems so similar, I do have other symptoms like joint pain (was told I had arthritis as a child but couldn’t see another doctor about it), I do have fatigue but I thought maybe its because I’m underweight from losing weight when I found out I had Celiac (an autoimmune disorder)

    1. Kitty

      The only way to know for sure is to see a Rheumatologist to confirm. They will look at your rash and run blood work such as an ANA, (anti-nucleur antibody) if it is a high positive, you have a very good chance of having Lupus. Rosasia (sp?) can look similiar which is just an adult form of acne. Even somebody very fair and sensitive to sun may get a rash. So see the Rheumie and GOOD LUCK!!

  2. samekid480

    How long does a lupus butterfly rash last?
    I’m currently being tested for lupus (blood work) and I’ve already been diagnosed with fibromyalgia. I’m wondering how long the butterfly rash last because I have had similar rashes, but they appeared to me to look more like too much sun (not scaly) than a rash and they would disappear a day or two later. It just appeared to be a sunburn on my cheeks and nose, even if I wasn’t out in the sun too long. Does this sound like a malar rash? I can’t seem to find too many pictures on here. Thank you!

    1. Linda R

      If you are one of the people who gets the butterfly rash, and not all of us do, it will come and go. It’s very individual, so no one can answer that question.

      If you want to see the wide variety of lupus rashes, type “google images” into your search bar then type “lupus rash” and you will get tons of pictures.

      The malar rash typically does not occur in the fold that runs from the nostrils down to the corner of the mouth.

      Many patients have lupus and fibro in overlap. (Just went to a conference on that today.)

      Good luck with your hunt for a diagnosis.

  3. kkayona

    lupus??? help, please!! ?
    so, about two years ago i was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis.. when they did all the blood tests, they were also positive for lupus, but the doctors never did anything because i didn’t have any ‘outward physical signs’ of it.. well, yesterday i noticed a small rash on my face (across my cheeks) and i sent a picture of it to my mom (who works for a doctor) and she showed it to him and he said it definitely looked like a ‘butterfly rash’ (a symptom of lupus’).. so, now, i’m wondering, how likely is it that it is lupus? i’m really really worried..should i be? or am i worrying over nothing?

    1. Desi

      You have reason to be concerned. This is a common symptom or sign of lupus. It means your body is beginning to produce symptoms of active disease. You need to follow up with your primary doctor and get the ball rolling. You don’t need to suffer unnecessarily with some of these symptoms that will occur, the sooner you treat them the more control you’ll have maintaining your illness.

      * They may consider further testing at this time. Auto-immune diseases can be tricky to diagnose. Because of the, “butterfly rash,” they may rule out the rheumatoid arthritis. Lupus alone may be the culprit for your aching and swollen joints. I wish you luck…I suffer from an auto-immune disease myself. You’ll have good days and bad, I’ll say a prayer for more good ones!

  4. Act4Love

    Should I get tested for Lupus?
    Hi, I’m 16 years old. I’ve been suffering from bumps and redness on my face (cheeks, mostly), and it’s been something which I cannot get rid of. I thought it was just acne. My mom, however, is currently studying to be a nurse, and in her textbook she stumbled upon a picture of the butterfly rash often associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (known as Lupus/SLE). I didn’t think much of it, until my mom and I researched the symptoms.
    These are the symptoms I’m currently experiencing:
    *Rash?
    *Extreme fatigue
    *Depression
    *Joint pain (mostly in my knees and ankles)
    *Migraine-like headaches almost every day for the past month
    *Difficulty concentrating
    *Psychosis
    *Inflamation of organs-last year I was diagnosed with gastreoenteritis.
    *Also, about a week and a half ago my back (around the kidney area) started hurting
    *I thought it was my period, but I have dried up blood that comes out everytime I wipe after urinating.
    *I have virtually no appetite.
    *My vision has been blurred the past few days.
    *The “flares” started about 2 weeks after the fatigue.

    What do you think about it?
    Thank you in advance.

    P.S- The symptoms listed started before I found out about the disease…less chance of psychosomatic diagnosis 🙂

    1. FirstStar

      Yes, you should probably get tested!

      Lupus is an Autoimmune disease, which is caused by both genetic and environmental factors, so, if you have a family history of auto immune diseases (Such as Crohns Disease, Scleroderma, Rheumatoid Arthritis ect…) You are at an increased risk, also if you are female and between 15 to 45.

      It takes awhile to diagnose Lupus, but your doctor will (most likely) refer you to an Internal Medicine Doctor, or may order the test themselves (Blood test! Urine test!) And depending on what the doctor thinks, the blood test will include an ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) test (Very important test!!! if this comes out positive, it could mean Lupus, or another auto-immune disorder!!!)

      Some other blood tests may also include tests for Hep. C, and Hep D, along with a Creatinine test, Bilrubin and Albumin test (Too much to type- Google it!) and ALT test (To see how epic your liver is doing!)

      So YES. Get tested; because like I said, it takes awhile to diagnose because the symptoms mimic so many other diseases; it could take months.

      Good Luck! 🙂

      I’m 17 and had Lupus symptoms too; test results come back in January (Next month!) Hope 4 the best!

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