There is significant concern about Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, also known as CFS. In fact, there are criteria patients must meet in order to be diagnosed with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. Receiving the diagnosis may be difficult for some patients because the guidelines for diagnosing are very specific. The fatigue must have been present at least six consecutive months and the corresponding symptoms must have developed after the fatigue. A clear definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, its symptoms, and treatment options will help sufferers get a clearer understanding of the syndrome.

What is Chronic Fatigue?
The basic definition of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome does not make sufferers feel much better. The syndrome is unexplained and is marked by weakness, fatigue, muscle pain, lethargy, trouble sleeping, and even fever and swollen lymph nodes. There is no known cause for the fatigue that is present in an individual that has no relation to over-exertion and is not rectified by rest.

Symptoms
Some of the symptoms associated with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome have been discussed. However, there is a very long list. There are a variety of symptoms that patients are very aware of and then there are other symptoms only doctors seem to notice. Regardless, when the symptoms are present for a period of time for no apparent cause and seem to have no remedy then Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is a frequent diagnosis.

Some of the frequent symptoms of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome include:

-Muscle Aches
-Persistent Fatigue
-Intermittent Fatigue
-Depression
-Tiredness
-Headache
-Swollen Lymph nodes
-Depression
-Memory Loss
-Weakness
-Difficulty Concentrating
-Achy Joints

Frequently Chronic Fatigue Syndrome begins during periods when individuals have been sick, under a tremendous amount of stress, or for no apparent reason at all. Many individuals have noted that after bouts with the flu, mono, a cold, bronchitis, hepatitis, and other similar illnesses CFS arises. Unfortunately, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome persists for months, sometimes coming and going and other times constantly affecting the patient. Other illnesses begin to clear up after a few days or weeks, but Chronic Fatigue Syndrome sticks around with no clear cause.

Diagnosing Chronic Fatigue
Doctors find it very difficult to diagnose Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The reason why is because so many of its symptoms are symptoms of other illnesses. This is why many doctors like to see patients with the same symptoms that began after the fatigue for at least six months before giving a diagnosis. Obviously, sufferers of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome find the lack of an early diagnosis difficult to bear on top of their symptoms. However, doctors like to rule out diseases like Lupus and Multiple Sclerosis, as well as other diseases, before diagnosing Chronic Fatigue.

Additionally, researchers and doctors are becoming more aware of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and are more likely to make an earlier diagnosis based on fewer symptoms than ever before. That is not to say that Chronic Fatigue Syndrome is easy to diagnose, because it is not. However increased awareness and new definitions are helping doctors and patients of Chronic Fatigue each and every day.

Treatment Options
The treatment options for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome are varied and include alternative as well as prescription alternatives.

Some of the alternative care management options for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome include avoiding stress and undertaking light exercise. Other treatment options that work for some individuals include massage, aquatic therapy, chiropractic therapy, yoga, self hypnosis, tai chi, and even acupuncture. Psychotherapy has also proven helpful to sufferers of Chronic Fatigue Syndrome because it helps sufferers learn to cope with their symptoms.

Prescription treatment options for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome have not been approved by the FDA. There are however other prescription medications that are used to treat the symptoms presented with Chronic Fatigue. Frequently, the primary use of the medicine is secondary and its side effects are what benefit Chronic Fatigue sufferers. Medicines like antifungals, antidepressants, antivirals, cardiac drugs, antihistamines, immunoglobulins, corticoids, anti-inflammatories, and anti-convulsants among others are frequently prescribed to CFS sufferers.

Do You Have CFS?

If you are worried you have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome or have some of the above stated symptoms for months on end then you should make an appointment with your physician. It is a good idea to keep a journal of your symptoms, when they began, and if new ones appear. This will help your doctor make the proper diagnosis and help receive some relief from your symptoms sooner.

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3 thoughts on “Chronic Fatigue The Facts You Should Know

  1. JENNIFER

    Why would my doctor order a Lupus Profile with no family history of Lupus?
    My doctor has used diagnosis codes for Neuritis and Vertigo, and ordered a Lupus Profile and ANA w/ Reflex.

  2. Sabrina B

    How do I know if I have a uterine infection after giving birth and if Keflex is the right atbc to treat it?
    Hi! I just gave birth to my first child 10 days ago and had really bad complications after the delivery. I was in labor for 27 hours, pushed for an hour, and got the usual Pitocin and epidural. My OB had manually pulled out my placenta immediately after the delivery of my baby and I had not asked him to! I was hemorrhaging for the 1st 2 days. I even passed out 2 hours after I gave birth, as soon as I transferred to the maternity ward! The same night, I was about to pass out a 2nd time and my blood pressure dipped at its lowest. They had to call an emergency code and all of the doctors and nurses rushed into my room. The reason for my postpartum hemorrhage was because I had retained fragments of the placenta in my uterus and a dr. had to manually push the clot out! On top of that, I had a distended bladder and couldn’t urinate on my own, so they had to Foley cath me for 3 days. I didn’t have an episiotomy or any tears, but had a few abrasions inside my vagina. I also had a hematoma on the left labia. I lost so much blood, 55%, I became anemic and was supplemented with a stronger iron than what I was taking during pregnancy. I was on IV fluids for 3 days and stayed in the hospital for 4 days. Ever since I got home, my lochia had been getting less and less but the hematoma on my left labia became so painfully excruciating it had even turned hard even with the sitz baths I’ve been taking. It was so painful every time I went to the bathroom, to urinate or pass a bowel. Even on pain meds, the vaginal pain was so severe, I had to go to the emergency. I was examined and they told me in time, it will heal and go away on its own and the hematoma is too small to cut open and drain.

    Then today I noticed I started bleeding more and even passing big clots, whereas previous days, my bleeding was brown and very small, like dime sized amounts with no clots at all. In addition, I’ve been having extreme severe abdominal pains since this morning. I saw my OB today and he examined my uterus by pressing down on my belly and I grimaced so much because the pain was so bad. He told me it’s not supposed to be that painful at this point, 10 days after giving birth. He concluded that I had a uterine infection and put me on Keflex 4 times a day for 10 days. I’m not sure if he diagnosed me correctly since he only pressed down on my tummy and didn’t run any tests to confirm that it’s an infection. Also, how would he know what kind of antibiotic to prescribe to me if he doesn’t even know what kind of uterine infection is invading me? I know there are different kinds of uterine infections based on the different types of bacteria! I’m a new grad LVN (practical nurse) and even though I haven’t worked since I got pregnant during school, I know that I should be skeptical of something about his diagnosis! I don’t have a fever or any other signs and symptoms of an infection other than the extreme abdominal pain and painful urination/ bowel movements. The emergency department took a urine sample from me and a bladder infection or UTI came out negative so I know I don’t have that! Someone out there please help me! I just want to make sure my OB and medical team during my labor and delivery have the best interest in taking good care of me instead of killing me! I just want to be alive and healthy to raise my daughter and for my uterus to not be affected so I can have more children after this! Thank you so much in advance!

    FYI: I also have Lupus, but a mild form of it since none of my organs are affected….only Raynaud’s Disease and eczema which is about it!

    1. mgunnycappo

      Keflex is a broad spectrum antibiotic and will cover you regardless of what specific bacteria you have. He’s probably giving you the antibiotics as a prophylaxis, just in case. I would venture to say that you’ll improve over the next couple of days.

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