” Systemic Lupus Erythematosus “( referred to as SLE) is a system for autoimmune diseases , causes and rheumatoid arthritis, Ankylosing spondylitis is similar to patientsImbalance in the immune system , resulting in excessive abnormal antibodies, and their cells mistaken for the enemy to attack . This disease can affect many organs and tissues of the body , causing inflammation and a variety of serious complications . Such as lack of governance, lupus affects the kidneys , heart, lungs and nervous system , resulting in a variety of serious complications such as nephritis, myocarditis, pleural effusion , encephalitis , can lead toThyroidOrgan failure and even death.

Had an approximately 40 -year-old man suffering from lung cancer ,Physical examinationAdmitted to hospital with fever, abdominal rash , vomiting and bowel movements a week with a trickle , later proved to have sepsis . Test of her stool samples with Strongyloides worms . The man lived 70 years in Vietnam for a long time , then moved to Hong Kong , estimated that he was infected in Vietnam . Strongyloides worms lurking in his body about 30 years , may be bred dozens or even hundreds . If the Strongyloides worms too many will lead to pulmonary or intestinal bleeding , or pneumonia, the disease may induce asthma . Strongyloides worms can be found in the intestines of bacteria such as E. coli into the blood , leading to sepsis , severe life-threatening . Strongyloides worms appear mainly in Southeast Asia , people traveling abroad not to play barefoot in the countryside , to protect us from infection .

Eyes not only window to the soul , a person can predict whether there will be little futureStroke. Centre for Eye Research Australia, found that health care workers , such as the health of abnormal retinal blood vessels , the brain appears next small increased risk of stroke two to three times. Small stroke (mini-Stroke) , also known as silent stroke , vascular occlusion affecting the brain due to blood supply , so a small part of the hypoxic brain damage , can cause mild cognitive problems, but patients may not detect abnormal physical activity , diagnosis is also difficult. But the small increase in the future there will be a fatal stroke, stroke or even the risk of dementia . Researchers to determine if the retinal vascular abnormalities , the small risk of stroke compared with no retinopathy two to three times higher , such as the early members of the public from the health of the eye abnormalities found atSituation , you can take early preventive measures .

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Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/thyroid-organ-127364.html


diagnostic tests for systemic lupus erythematosus

6 thoughts on “Diagnostic Tests For Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

  1. Sweet Pea

    What does it mean to have a possible positive lupus test?
    I have been having serious joint pain for some time now. My doctor tested me for arthritis, RA, and lupus. He said the test came back as a possible positive for lupus and he is sending me to a Rheumatologist for further testing. Does this mean they just don’t know or does it mean they are sending me for a confirmation? Has anybody had this happen to them?

    1. gpk.gr

      Dear Sweat Pea,
      the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases and specially systemic lupus erythematosus is based on clinical findings and past medical history. Laboratory values are use mainly for confirmation and sometimes to estimate disease activity. Please be patient until you visit your rheumatologist. As a specialist he will guide you through the differential diagnostic of arthritis (over 200 types!). I’m pretty sure you will feel frustrated after the first visit but afterwards you will begin to built a relationship with your rheumatologist based on his ability to understand your complaints and relieve your pain. Feel free to contact me and ask again!

  2. Maharial

    Drug-induced lupus, will it come back?
    A close family member of mine has had drug-induced lupus (it took him over 8 months to be symptom free), and now he is afraid to take all drugs, because every time he has taken anything at all (Sudafed, aspirin, Benedryl, etc.), he has a relapse. Will this happen forever? Does anyone have an experience with this? Are there any drugs (perscription or not) that seem to be OK? What happens if he needs something for an illness in the future? The original drug that started this whole mess was a high-dose naporsin perscribed to him for arthritis pain.

    1. christibro40

      Hi Im Chris. I have SLE, The systemic form of Lupus. I was very hesitent to answer this question. I co-own a online support group for Lupus paitents and and do much of the research for the group, and wanted to make sure my information was accurate. I have read a lot about drug induced Lupus and all indicators say yes, he should be ok after the offending drug is stopped and out of his system.

      But after thinking about this one for a bit, I thought about my largest flare. It was from being in a house for over a year that we didnt know had toxic mold. We have since moved, and Im doing better, but I still have problems. Like if I have any expousre to mold in a building, certain cleaners, even things like plants outside. So I still have some sensitivities that may take a couple of years to fully get out of my system.

      That may be the same case with your family memeber with medications, and it may be an issue for the rest of his life and mine. Your also saying he was perscribed naprosin for arthritis pain. The thing is that is not one of the Lupus inducing drugs. If he already has arthritis, it may mean he has a mild case of it already, and that it comes and goes depending on what he is taking in.

      My suggestion is that he goes back to a rhuemotologist to get another autoimmune panal done, where they can test his ANA, Anti DNA- AntiSM and the rest, and see if any of it comes back positive. Im also going to give you the 11 critera for Lupus. To have it you must have met 4 at one point or another during your life. Drugs or no drugs. Let him see it, and he needs to think about his health history and report it to a doctor.

      Diagnostic criteria for lupus
      The following criteria are used to distinguish lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE) from other autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.

      A person with 4 of these 11 conditions can be diagnosed with lupus; 3 symptoms suggest that lupus is probably present, and 2 raise the possibility of lupus. Symptoms may be present all at once or appear in succession over a period of time. 1

      Butterfly (malar) rash on cheeks
      Rash on face, arms, neck, torso (discoid rash)
      Skin rashes that result from exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light (photosensitivity)
      Mouth or nasal ulcers, usually painless
      Joint swelling, stiffness, pain involving two or more joints (arthritis)
      Inflammation of the membranes surrounding the lungs (pleuritis) or heart (pericarditis). This inflammation is called serositis.
      Abnormalities in urine, such as increased protein or clumps of red blood cells or kidney cells, called cell casts, in the urine
      Nervous system problems, such as seizures or psychosis, without known cause
      Problems with the blood, such as reduced numbers of red blood cells (anemia), platelets, or white blood cells
      Positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) test
      Signs of increased autoimmunity (antibodies against normal tissue), as shown by laboratory tests

      I hope this helps
      Chris

      Ill also include a couple links

  3. jenhicks87

    I have been getting red patches of skin… lupus?
    I recently asked a question about lupus. I know you can get rashes. but I have been getting red patches of skin that are dry and have a scab over them. but there has been no trauma to the skin. I still haven’t gotten my results back from my arthritis blood tests. I think when I go back to the doctor I will ask if I can get the blood tests that show symptoms of lupus. ( I know there is no specific test for lupus) but anyway, the red patches of skin with scabs (flaky, peeling skin) does this happen with lupus?

    1. christibro40

      Jen, In all my years with Lupus, I have almost every rash imaginable, to sun exposed skin and non exposed skin. Yours sounds almost eczama like. which in and of itself is an autoimmune disease, and I spent half my childhood walking around with. so yes, rashes of all types, fall into the Lupus critera.

      I do think avoiding any sun is a good idea, Also they may want to biopsy that area, and other areas where you may have open sores or a butterfly rash (along bridge of nose along to cheecks.

      As far as blood tests to show symptims of lupus, they can check to see if you are anemic, have any changes in red or white blood counts, platelets, and a few other things. Those red patches of skin, I get even when I have a band aid put on…

      so go figure.

      But there are so many strange things that can happen, but for each new thing that happens write it down, photograph it, if its visible. You never kno, it may go towards the diagnostic critera and you dont even know it yet. But I will post it so you do know, lol. here is the Lupus diagnostic critera.
      Best wishes
      Chris

      Diagnostic criteria for lupus
      Provided by:
      Last Updated: June 29, 2004
      Diagnostic criteria for lupus
      The following criteria are used to distinguish lupus (systemic lupus erythematosus, or SLE) from other autoimmune and rheumatic diseases.

      A person with 4 of these 11 conditions can be diagnosed with lupus; 3 symptoms suggest that lupus is probably present, and 2 raise the possibility of lupus. Symptoms may be present all at once or appear in succession over a period of time. 1

      Butterfly (malar) rash on cheeks
      Rash on face, arms, neck, torso (discoid rash)
      Skin rashes that result from exposure to sunlight or ultraviolet light (photosensitivity)
      Mouth or nasal ulcers, usually painless
      Joint swelling, stiffness, pain involving two or more joints (arthritis)
      Inflammation of the membranes surrounding the lungs (pleuritis) or heart (pericarditis). This inflammation is called serositis.
      Abnormalities in urine, such as increased protein or clumps of red blood cells or kidney cells, called cell casts, in the urine
      Nervous system problems, such as seizures or psychosis, without known cause
      Problems with the blood, such as reduced numbers of red blood cells (anemia), platelets, or white blood cells
      Positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) test
      Signs of increased autoimmunity (antibodies against normal tissue), as shown by laboratory tests

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