“I feel like I have been hit by a truck!” Have you ever found yourself muttering these words upon waking from what should have been a good night sleep or a nap that you felt you desperately needed? Feeling worse than when you went to sleep can be a very common experience for people who are challenged by chronic pain especially related to the chronic pain that is a part of fibromyalgia.

There is HOPE and strategies for maximizing a good night sleep in order to achieve the benefits of restorative sleep. Good quality restorative sleep is very important. It is during this time that our bodies are supposed to be able to focus on restoring, repairing, reenergizing and much more. The following are strategies to help improve a good restorative night's sleep. One very important strategy is to go to bed and get up everyday around approximately the same time. For instance, you can set 10:30 PM as your time to go to bed and 6:30 AM as your time to get up with the goal of not straying by more than

36 thoughts on “Fibromyalgia Pillow

  1. Angel Anime Kay

    You know those tiny little beads of white balls in pillows?
    Where can I get them? The tiny little beads of white balls in pillows that are squishy? (: I’m an anime freak and want to make a Dango from Clannad so I need those little white balls, can I buy them from somewhere?

    1. hobbyladyl

      The tiny beads are called micro beads. They are smaller than the ones used in beanbags. I order mine from JoAnn’s or Hancock fabric. They are a bit expensive as they run about $20.00 a bag. I have used them to make pillows for patients with fibromyalgia.
      I would check fabric stores first and then check craft stores in your area. Since I live in the country I order mine as it is just easier.

  2. pinkpugsy

    If you have fibromyalgia, how can you get into delta sleep without medication?
    I was diagnosed with fibromyalgia a year ago; my doctor discovered that a lot of my symptoms were caused by my body not reaching deep sleep during the night. I was put on Elavil (Amitriptyline) to assist in reaching the delta stage of sleep. However, due to the side effects, I no longer want to take the Elavil. I am sure there must be a way to train my body to enter deep sleep, but am not sure how to go about it. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated!! 🙂

    1. ★☆✿❀

      I’ve been diagnosed with Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue and Restless Leg Syndrome (also now possibly Lupus).

      I was put on Amitriptyline as well, and then came off it because of the side effects.

      My doctor prescribed me some sleeping pills, which I take only when I have a bad night of the RLS. I feel amazing in the morning. Like I’m a whole new person and I can actually function. You could speak to your doctor about this. The sleeping pills are addictive, but it’s nice to have a good night sleep. I take one every two weeks or so.

      I also have some herbal sleeping pills which contains Valeriana. The first night I took them, they were amazing but since then they’ve done nothing. But maybe worth a try. I got mine over the counter at the pharmacy.

      I think it’s important to have a structured sleeping pattern. I mean going to bed to sleep at the same time each night and waking up at the same time. I tried to go to sleep at 10 and waking up at 7.30. It did help a lot and my sleep was a lot more refreshing, but I didn’t like having to wake up so early.

      When you go to bed, don’t eat or go on the computer or watch TV. Your bed should be for sleeping only, and reading if that helps you to fall asleep. You could also find some relaxing music.

      Keep busy when you can. I know it’s so hard when you’re in a lot of pain and you’re tired and have no energy, but do what you can. If you can manage a short 10 minute walk around the block once or twice a day, you should definitely try it. Go at your own pace. You could try swimming or aqua jogging as well. Just keep yourself busy so by the time your head hits the pillow you want to sleep.

      Eat a well balanced diet. I’ve removed gluten from my diet. It’s a pain, but I’m going to feel a lot better. Avoid caffeine and sugars as well. Drink plenty of water as well.

      Good luck, you can email me if you like =]

    1. BrainBabe

      Hush Puppies moccasins are pretty sweet…and great for casual wear…

      I have some Easy Spirit slip-on sneakers (that look like clogs) that almost feel like I am walking on pillows! Even after walking all day, with Fibromyalgia and a bad knee, these shoes keep my feet from hurting…they are miracles on rubber soles!

  3. STK

    What’s the best mattress?
    We need to get a new one and I’m looking for recommendations. We’re both in our mid thirties and healthy so it’s not for any back issues. Like one that’s not too hard.

    1. kr8r4u

      You should consider several factors when selecting a mattress:
      1. Are you a back, side or stomach sleeper.
      2. Are you male or female.
      3. Does your back ache before you go to bed or when you get up in the morning?
      4. Weight.
      5. Body style/type.

      Back sleepers disperse their body weight over a greater surface area and can therefore utilize a firmer mattress without creating pressure points on any given part of their body. Be cautioned not to get one that is as hard as a rock however.
      Side sleepers need more cushioning on the top of the mattress because the pressure points are then concentrated on the hip and shoulder areas. This is also where being a male or female comes into play. Males are for the most part, ‘straight’ along the hip and abdominal region, therefore not requiring as much padding. Females, on the other hand, are generally more ‘curvy’, typically with AT LEAST a three inch difference between the hip bone and the waist (if you held a straight edge along the side of your body.) Therefore, females that are side sleepers require at least a three to four inch pillow top, depending on the distance between the hip and abdominal region. Some may require more.
      If your back aches before you get into bed at night, there is likely more than one cause. If it is fine during the day and only aches when you get up in the morning, it is likely your mattress–if your a female side sleeper, it may be to firm or just worn out–especially if it is over 10 years old. If you’re a back or stomach sleeper, the mattress and/or box is likely sagging and worn out, allowing your body to sag and put pressure on your spine, causing it to ache from being in an unnatural position, and not being supported properly.
      Weight: The heavier you are, the better quality bed you need. All innerspring units are not created equal. There are light duty innersprings, good for children and people up to 150 to 175 lbs. Then there are heavy guage innerspring units that will last longer for heavier individuals. You may also want to consider a mattress that is ‘foam encased’ around the edges (extremely high density foam) which provides additional support around the edges and adds more ‘body’ to the mattress as a whole.
      Body type/style: As partially discussed earlier, body type and style encompasses many factors. Your weight, the shape of your body on the front (do you have a ‘beer belly’ or something similar), the shape of your body on the sides (are you pretty much straight up and down along the side or are you really curvy in the midsection), and any issues that you may have with your back, whether spinal, muscle or tendon related, do you have any medical conditions such as fibromyalgia which have inherent, painful pressure points on the shoulders and hips, etc.
      As a side sleeper, look for a mattress that allows your hip and shoulder to be absorbed into it, yet conforms to and supports your abdominal region. The average person cannot tell this by ‘laying’ on a mattress. They don’t know what to look for and what to pay attention to.
      So what do I pay attention to? you ask. 1) Lay on the bed in the position that you typically sleep. Just plop down there like you usually do. 2) Now the concentration begins. 3) Conciously, with your mind, check out what each area of your body is feeling. 4) What is my shoulder feeling? Is it comfortable? Lay there for 5 minutes. Is it starting to tingle (an indication of pressure points). 5) What is my hip feeling? Comfort, pressure points, tingling, etc. 6) What is my abdominal region feeling? Is it being supported straight and comfortably? 7) Do I feel pressure on my lower back in my spine and is it starting to ache?

      Do the same for back and stomach sleepers.

      Remember, the quality of a mattress is not determined by the price. Society in general has been brainwashed into associating quality with price. This isn’t always true. It depends where you shop. If you shop at a Big Box store, expect to pay $2-3,000 for an excellent quality mattress. At the same time, YOU MAY NOT NEED AN EXCELLENT QUALITY MATTRESS! Personally, I could spoil myself with a $1,000 mattress from a small local store. However, all I really need is a $2-300 mattress set. Then again, I sleep on my back.

      Hope this is helpful. If you have any more specific questions, feel free to contact me at 801-746-1295

      Thanks,

      Shaunell

  4. Dude94

    What can cause lower back pain in teens?
    I am a 15 year old 5’6 1/2 185 pound male. I am involved in a sport and i have lower back problems to the point that if i bend over to pick something up my my back starts to hurt. Can someone please tell me why this is so and are there any cures that may be able to help me????

    1. Bethy

      Back pain can come from a:

      * Aortic aneurysm
      * Degeneration of the disks
      * Kidney problems, such as infections or stones
      * Muscle spasm
      * Other medical conditions like fibromyalgia
      * Poor alignment of the vertebrae
      * Ruptured or herniated disk
      * Small fractures to the spine
      * Spinal stenosis
      * Spine curvatures -MOST LIKELY
      * Strain or tears to the muscles or l igaments supporting the back – SECOND MOST LIKELY

      If you feel it is not a back pain but a lower pain it might also be:

      Bladder infection
      Testicular torsion
      Kidney Stone

      Gradually reduce activity for a few days, look for other symptoms that might narrow the cause

      Apply heat and cold to the pain

      Sleep on your side with a pillow between your legs

      If the pain persists after 4 weeks go to a doctor or if new symptoms present go to the doctor

    1. FibroFunnyGirl

      Hello,

      I have been living with Fibromyalgia since 2000. I do still work full-time but my memory is poor. I compensate by writing loads of stuff down and reviewing it each morning at work to get back on track. There are times when fatigue hits and I either have to go to my car to nap or go home sick.

      I am remarried and have two teenagers that test my limits all the time. My husband is supportive and does his best to help.

      Here are a few of my symptoms: Tired, pain in neck, back & hips, sciatica, muscles strung so tight they are screaming….Also have herniated discs & hypothyroidism

      Treatments: synthroid, cytomel, ultram, flexeril, lyrica, wellbutrin, elavil, decongestants, TENS, moist heat and ice packs. Hip gets so bad that I receive steroid injections 2-3 times a year.

      Because I am on such a heavy med solution, I sleep about 6 hours before waking, but never reach REM sleep so remain tired. I do not dream, haven’t dreamed much since traumatic childhood.

      I work full-time and have special equipment to allow me more support while sitting and typing. I wear a heated buckwheat pillow around my neck while working.

      How about you? What are your treatments and medicines?

  5. noexcusesandnodrama

    What foods are BEST to eat when you have Fibromyalgia & Fatigue?
    I have been diagnosed with Fibro&Fatigue and am wondering if anyone else who has this has found foods that help or even foods that make the condition worse. I am trying to find out everything I can about this disease and what I can do to help the symptoms on my own. I am not a big fan of mediciations over a long period of time. Also, what are techniques you use to sleep better at night? Without medication I currently wake up feeling exhausted!

    1. perudonations

      I have diagnosed Chronic Fatigue for 16 years now. I have found no food changes to be beneficial per se, but there are sensitivities and allergies to food that we can tolerate when we are healthy, and not at all when we are not well. Additionally, a compromised immune system may not be able to stave off a candidia attack in the gut. For that reason, I have cut back on sugars which promote candidisis, and have given up on milk and wheat products. A friend gave me a copy of “The Fibromyalgia Cookbook” by Shelley Ann Smith. It’s rules are: no red meat, no white flour, limited starchy foods, etc. These are all foods which some persons may be sensitive to, Additives are also limited or eliminated. I tried the recommendations and must report there was no noticeable change. But, every person has a different type of response, and as you know, the illness moves in cycles. As to the sleeping, I have tried melatonin and other soothing herbs like lemon grass with some success. Calcuim before bedtime promotes sound sleep. There are a dozen different pillows on my bed, and l bought a sleep-number bed also. The only single thing that has really helped me sleep well is a prescription med, sorry. A 30mg per day (one fifth the therapeutic dose) of amitriptalyne, an anti-depressant, has helped my sleep and pain management immesely. There is a vitamin and supplement company specifically devoted to CFS-FM help. They are called “Pro Health.” They also donate some of their profts from sales to research on CFS-FM. You can find out about their products online. I am happy to help you find sources and to share my experiences in the quest of the “magic bullet.”

    1. Squiggler

      Yep, hot baths help. I’m not sure about massage because it makes mine worse – it’s far too painful for me most of the time and several professional massuers have given up on me over the years. Also, after massage or swimming (exercise) I get rashes with a fever and migraine. I am lead to believe this is due to the level of toxins released into the blood which were held in the muscles – but I’m not 100% that this is the cause.

      I have found that the best ‘treatment’ for fibromyalgia is actually a memory foam mattress topper (you could get a whole mattress I suppose but I’ve never tried one). I know that probably sounds completely barking that a different mattress could make such a difference but I have recommended it to friends with the illness and they too have all found benefits on varying levels.

      Sometimes when the pain gets too much, instead of hammering prescription strength painkillers, I go and lie on my mattress completely flat. It’s too painful to use pillows as my worst affected muscles are my neck, shoulders and the top of my back. I suspect this is due to quite a serious neck injury I had as a child, but who knows?

  6. Bad Habit

    When I sleep I often wake up with a very bad pain in my shoulder and elbow joints. Any ideas why?
    I’ve been told that it’s because my arm is falling asleep because I might be sleeping on it. But I’m pretty sure that it’s not.

    1. Cjeanmc

      Look into Rheumatoid Arthritis or Fibromyalgia. I have the shoulder and elbow problem along with many others and it seems to be Fibromyalgia.

      Or you might just be sleeping on it in a strange way. Have you Googled you symptom to see what comes up?

      Have you gotten a new pillow recently, maybe thicker than your old one.

      I got a new one for Christmas $88.00 for a pillow and now the shoulder has problems. You cannot win for losing.

  7. Yousif (Joe) R

    What is a good gift for someone who is suffering from fibromyalgia – something thoughtful to ease the pain?
    I’m looking for something that actually works…

    Someone recommended herbal remedies (I don’t know of any), massage therapist gift certificates… any other suggestions?

    1. to tell ya the truth...........

      My daughter made me a big fat pillow with seed in it that I could throw in the microwave…its absoultly the next best thing to the hot tub…an electric blanket is nice too if the fabric isn’t scratchy at all. and a foot bath is nice if the water stays warm( some don’t)
      What a thoughtful,thoughtful person you are. Will you marry me if my husband stops being such a thoughtful,thoughtful person?

  8. Paprika

    How can I sleep on my stomach without hurting my neck?
    I have fibromyalgia and sleeping on my sides kills my hips, and sleeping on my back kills, well, my back. I’ve discovered that I hurt the least while lying on my stomach. However this wrecks havoc for my neck. Is there a way to keep it from getting hurt? Like what they use on massage tables or something?

    1. j

      I feel more comfortable on my stomach if I have a really flat pillow or no pillow at all. Because I don’t have an incline on my neck, it’s just flat. And if that doesn’t work, can you sleep on your back at an incline?? Kind of sitting up?

  9. Sweety

    Me and my partner are looking to buy our first mattress, best brand?
    memory foam or temperpedic? We need a mattress to support our backs and if possible to get rid of aches and pains in the lower back area. We are in our mid to late 20s but we intend to keep the mattress for many many years to come. Any ideas?
    Thanks in advance

    1. PAULA F

      I love visco elastic. I have fibromyalgia & rheumatoid arthritis & it has saved me. I would not get a pillow top. Get a regular top & add your own pillow top mattress cover that can be washed (Penney’s has the best ones for the money) Remember to rotate your mattress every 3 months to extend the life. Get a 20 year warranty. Sealy makes a mattress for Bassett Furniture called Tru Form that is excellent. Get the “firm” & add a comfu pillow top mattress cover.

  10. glamour girl

    what does your body feel like when you have fibromyalgia?
    i’m not sure if i have it or not, but my hips ache, my body aches and it’s getting harder and harder for me to walk up and down the stairs and sitting for extended amounts of time.would this be fibromyalgia.

    1. mysticmayr

      So Sorry you are having to go through this. I am having simular issues. I wrote a blog a couple of months ago about what it felt like to me. I have gotten some notes from a few fibro friends who said I hit the nail on the head – so I am passing it along for you. I wrote it as an open letter to friends and family to help them under stand.

      “First, I want to explain to you how it feels. This is a huge chasim I will have to bridge in sections for you. Let me begin with the general widespread pain you have read about. If you can think back for a moment, I ask you to pull from your memory the worst case of the flu you ever had. Remember that all over ache you felt? Now, take that feeling and imagine increasing it tenfold. That is a good day for me. Most days, it is an all consuming pain that deadens my thinking and brings in the ‘Fibrofog’, of which I am sure you have heard me speak. This pain makes concentrating on anything other than itself difficult. The pain can make it impossible to recall everyday words, make me forget what I was talking about in mid-sentence or give the perception I am a babbling idiot. No, I am not over medicated or loosing my mind. The pain is just there, constantly pulling my attention elsewhere and making it difficult to think of anything else.

      Then there is the other aches and pains I get. For instance, the pain in my legs. It can cause cramping, tingling and burning, then suddenly I am hit with a piercing sharp pain. It can be there one moment, then just as quickly gone only to surface again in anther place. There is the feeling of swelling – my knees feel stiff and full of fluid, but may look perfectly normal. My legs are so painful, I must move them often. However, at the same time, my knees are so stiff and painful to move, it causes me even more discomfort. At times, especially if I have been resting or sitting for a while, I have difficult standing on my feet. If they are not feeling swollen, they seem as if they are carrying me though sharp gravel or broken glass. All at the same time, my knees are stiff and my hips are painful, causing me to move with all the grace and poise of Frankenstein’s monster. Couple that with the cognitive issue I am having as well as the dizziness that often is a symptom of the Fibro and you can now see why I have had a few falls or stumble from time to time. It has nothing to do with my medications and I certainly have not been walking in my sleep.

      There is also never-ending pain in my neck and shoulders. It may be from the tension throughout the body, the result of dealing with the ongoing widespread pain or it could be a result of one of the top symptoms of Fibromyalgia, Tender Points. These Tender Points are distributed throughout the body and common to all Fibromites. They are painful areas where, when palpated cause extremes of discomfort from soreness to a slight sharp pain to an excruciating deep pain. A knot will often arise at a tender point and though very painful to the immediate touch, the real pain is often located elsewhere. This is called referred pain. For instance, one of the tenderpoints in my shoulder region may not only cause pain there, but it may press on a nerve which carries that signal to my chest muscles making it feel like the pain is generated there. It can also cause pain all along the offending muscle. There are several Tender Points in the neck and shoulder area. This pain can also make laying down or sleeping a painful venture. To try and compensate, I need to have an assortment of pillows and props to try and make things more comfortable.

      My hands often feel sore and stiff, especially when I first wake up or the weather is damp, cold , humid or stormy. I have trouble holding objects and often end up spilling my drink or breaking my favorite coffee mug. I am not getting lazy or impersonal, I have to type letters or send e-mail because of the pain involved in writing for any length of time. I have to use pens with special grips in order to ease the cramping. My fingers sometimes feel like sausages and my handwriting is sometimes not legible, even to me. I have to be careful when typing as I make a lot of mistakes because the fingers just do not work like they used to. Most days I can not enjoy unwinding with my favorite hobby because I can no longer count on my hands for dexterity or even steadiness. Not only do they not work properly, they are often shaky or trembling. The reason for the trembling and shaking is really not know. The ‘experts’ seem to think it is neurological in nature. It is something that I have had to learn to cope with and have had to change my routines to accommodate.

      Sometimes the pain is so bad that even the lightest touch is unbearable. A hug you may give, though a welcome sentiment, can cause me excruciating pain and set me back days in my treatment. I have had to modify my wardrobe to include only the most comfortable outfits. The wrong clothing may cause anything from minor skin irritation to excruciating pain depending on the length of time worn, the fabric or just simply the fit of the garment. Please do not judge me when I show up in what you think is not the best suited garment for the occasion. I know you would want me to be comfortable.

      I hope this brief letter will help you better understand the basic pain aspect of my illness. I hope I have given you something to ponder. I have tried to impart a bit of what I am going through. Next up are the ‘little” siblings of Fibro. The other tag-alongs that often come with this disease. I will cover them in my next letter. Until then, please try to be patient with me and my illness. I am the same person you have always known. I am striving to go on with my life and be the best I can be. ”

      I hope this helps a little. Please remember you are not alone. I have also included a couple of web links I have found helpful.
      Gentle Hugs & Healing Thoughts ~ Mayr

  11. astryd13

    Can I treat insomnia without a prescription?
    I have tried everything short of drugs, turning off everything and laying in bed for hours is not cutting it for me. Have tried hot teas, warm milk, exercise to wear myself out, relaxing to wind myself down, etc. I don’t have thoughts running through my head keeping me preoccupied and I’ve tried a meditative treatment.
    The odd part is I can fall asleep in the strangest of places (in my home or friends) laying on the sofa watching tv but not the bedroom. I’ve noticed it can happen more if there is sunlight and everyday noise but music/radio/tv and lights on at night don’t help either. I’ve been living on an average of 4hrs of sleep each night since I was 11 (I am now 25).
    I have a resistance to Lunesta, and a few other prescriptions. They have also given me nightmares and the aftereffects of the drugs make me feel worse than if I had not slept at all.
    Dr has run out of ideas because I’m being ‘difficult’…so what does a ‘difficult’ person do to get some sleep and much needed rest?

  12. Lizara

    what makes a mattress a “good mattress”?
    I have to buy a new mattress but I dont know how to tell if I’m getting a good mattress. Should it be firm or extra firm? I noticed over the years that my back has been aching off and on, due to sleeping on my couch and very old mattresses that I’ve had for years. I keep hearing that the mattress you sleep on has alot to do with how good you sleep and also how your body is affected, which is contributing to my back aching.

    I now have to buy a new mattress but I dont know what kind of mattress to buy or what company to get it from. Can anyone help me out? Thanks.
    I already have a bed, I have a canopy bed. It only requires a mattress – doesnt need the whole “box spring”, etc., just the mattress.

    1. kr8r4u

      You should consider several factors when selecting a mattress:
      1. Are you a back, side or stomach sleeper.
      2. Are you male or female.
      3. Does your back ache before you go to bed or when you get up in the morning?
      4. Weight.
      5. Body style/type.

      Back sleepers disperse their body weight over a greater surface area and can therefore utilize a firmer mattress without creating pressure points on any given part of their body. Be cautioned not to get one that is as hard as a rock however.
      Side sleepers need more cushioning on the top of the mattress because the pressure points are then concentrated on the hip and shoulder areas. This is also where being a male or female comes into play. Males are for the most part, ‘straight’ along the hip and abdominal region, therefore not requiring as much padding. Females, on the other hand, are generally more ‘curvy’, typically with AT LEAST a three inch difference between the hip bone and the waist (if you held a straight edge along the side of your body.) Therefore, females that are side sleepers require at least a three to four inch pillow top, depending on the distance between the hip and abdominal region. Some may require more.
      If your back aches before you get into bed at night, there is likely more than one cause. If it is fine during the day and only aches when you get up in the morning, it is likely your mattress–if your a female side sleeper, it may be to firm or just worn out–especially if it is over 10 years old. If you’re a back or stomach sleeper, the mattress and/or box is likely sagging and worn out, allowing your body to sag and put pressure on your spine, causing it to ache from being in an unnatural position, and not being supported properly.
      Weight: The heavier you are, the better quality bed you need. All innerspring units are not created equal. There are light duty innersprings, good for children and people up to 150 to 175 lbs. Then there are heavy guage innerspring units that will last longer for heavier individuals. You may also want to consider a mattress that is ‘foam encased’ around the edges (extremely high density foam) which provides additional support around the edges and adds more ‘body’ to the mattress as a whole.
      Body type/style: As partially discussed earlier, body type and style encompasses many factors. Your weight, the shape of your body on the front (do you have a ‘beer belly’ or something similar), the shape of your body on the sides (are you pretty much straight up and down along the side or are you really curvy in the midsection), and any issues that you may have with your back, whether spinal, muscle or tendon related, do you have any medical conditions such as fibromyalgia which have inherent, painful pressure points on the shoulders and hips, etc.
      As a side sleeper, look for a mattress that allows your hip and shoulder to be absorbed into it, yet conforms to and supports your abdominal region. The average person cannot tell this by ‘laying’ on a mattress. They don’t know what to look for and what to pay attention to.
      So what do I pay attention to? you ask. 1) Lay on the bed in the position that you typically sleep. Just plop down there like you usually do. 2) Now the concentration begins. 3) Conciously, with your mind, check out what each area of your body is feeling. 4) What is my shoulder feeling? Is it comfortable? Lay there for 5 minutes. Is it starting to tingle (an indication of pressure points). 5) What is my hip feeling? Comfort, pressure points, tingling, etc. 6) What is my abdominal region feeling? Is it being supported straight and comfortably? 7) Do I feel pressure on my lower back in my spine and is it starting to ache?

      Do the same for back and stomach sleepers.

      Remember, the quality of a mattress is not determined by the price. Society in general has been brainwashed into associating quality with price. This isn’t always true. It depends where you shop. If you shop at a Big Box store, expect to pay $2-3,000 for an excellent quality mattress. At the same time, YOU MAY NOT NEED AN EXCELLENT QUALITY MATTRESS! Personally, I could spoil myself with a $1,000 mattress from a small local store. However, all I really need is a $2-300 mattress set. Then again, I sleep on my back.

      Hope this is helpful. If you have any more specific questions, feel free to contact me at 801-746-1295

      Thanks,

      Shaunell

    1. Gayle

      I’ve never heard of activive so I can’t comment on that. I have fibromyalgia, however, and the following help me: pain killers, rest, soaks in a warm bath, heat packs, massage, and eating a well balanced diet. There’s no magic bullet. Some days it doesn’t bother me too much, other days I can’t get out of bed hardly.
      Just try not to overdue it, know your limits. Our muscles are hyper sensitive so you don’t want to strain them. Also, make sure you have a good pillow that places your neck in proper alignment while you sleep. You can also look up online, ways to relax. Hope this helps some.

  13. Peggy W

    woke this morning with severe eyelid and facial swelling. Went to er shot of Decadron, started medrol dosepak?
    a week ago it was severe swelling but mainly under my eyes to cheeks. Got a new pillow a month ago; could this be it (not feather) have fibromyalgia so concerned about another autoimmune thing going on. See Dr. monday, but don’t know what to put on my face or not to put on my face/haven’t used anything new with a month ago or so.

  14. vballsrthom3

    What is a good solution to my neck pain?
    I got whiplash from a fall 2 years ago. Ever since, I have had chronic neck pain. I get tons of knots in my neck and my C1-C4 vertebraes rotate out of place. This gives me a limited range of motion and constant pain. My mom massages my neck and I apply heat daily. I have tried acupuncture, massage, occupational therapy, physical therapy, chiropractor, biofeedback, traction, neck pillows, and different pain meds and muscle relaxers. What other suggestions do you have to help?

  15. Penny D

    Anyone here with Fibromyalgia and night time knee pain?
    My question is if anyone has suggestions for night time knee pain? My knees feel as though they are grinding against each other when I lay in a side sleeping position. I have tried pillows but they sometimes fall out. Laying on my back hurts even more. I have tried several meds but do not get a good night rest very often. I have thought of even trying some type of knee wrap or brace. Anyone have any ideas?

    1. Cherokee Billie

      I have Fibromyalgia and know how difficult it is to get comfortable for sleep. Laying on your side is not good as it’s putting more pressure on the knees. Laying on your back with a pillow or soft cushion under your knees will relieve the pressure in the low back. The best sleeping position is on the back because it keeps the spine in alignment. I know it’s difficult to sleep in a new position. I had to learn how to do this and I know you can learn how to sleep on your back.

      I suggest you take a hot bath with 2c. of dissolved Epsom salts and soak for 30 minutes every evening. This is going to relax the muscles and make it easier for you to get comfortable. Also at bedtime take 500mg of calcium and magnesium to help with Muscle relaxation.

      A knee brace or wrap is probably going to start hurting you in the middle of the night. You can try it, but I really believe it will cause you more pain.

      I have written an article about Fibromyalgia and I’ve enclosed ideas on how to manage the pain for yourself. The article is too large for here, so I have enclosed a link.

      If you have any questions please let me know,
      Billie77

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