Constipation can be termed as “The incomplete movements of the bowel. The disturbance in the digestive swathe also leads to various disorders in the body. The incomplete movement of the bowel does not permit in removing the toxins which are fabricated in the human body”.

Home Remedies for Constipation are as:-

1. The most effective remedy for the constipation patient's. There is no side effect of the Cassia. It could be taken by the pregnant women as well as by the children.

2. The second valuable therapy for the patient's of the constipation is the Termnalia chebula. The most vital benefit of this Termnalia chebula is that it assists in the proper blood circulations, improves digestion, rectifies the functioning of colon. It detoxifies liver, rectifies the digestive tracts & prevents from the constipation.

3. The third precious healing for the patient's of the constipation is the Phyllium husk i.e. Isabgol. The most efficient remedy for the constipation is the Phyllium husk i.e. Isabgol. It assists in preventing the constipation. Insert one tablespoon of Phyllium husk in a glass of water. Try to intake this either after dinner or during early hours with empty stomach.

4. The fourth effectual healing for the constipations patient's is the Castor Oil. It is also a very effective remedy for the constipation patient's. The most centre of attraction of this thing is that it possesses no side effects. It is also effective as a purgative. It has displayed mind blowing tremendous results in curing the constipation.

5. The fifth solid curing for the constipations patient's is the intake of bunch of raw green vegetables as well as salads. Swallow lot of water.

6. The sixth solid curing for the constipation patient's is the Evening Walk. After taking your dinner you should try to walk minimum 4-5 Kms. It is very essential for the digestion of the food in a proper way. It assists in rectifying the so called disease of constipation.

7. The seventh solid remedy for the constipation patient's is Mango.

8. The eighth concrete therapy for the constipation patient's is the intake of half cup cabbage juice which should be taken at least two times in a day.

9. Water should be drenched regularly as it is highly recommended for the patients of the constipation. As it assists in cleaning the system of the stomach. It is advisable to intake 6-8 glasses of water as it assists in digesting the food nutrients.

10. Milk along with Dates is also highly recommended for the patients of the constipation. It is also very beneficial for the patients of the constipation.

11. Even the yogasanas are highly beneficial for curing the disease of the constipation. Vajrasana is highly beneficial in getting relief from this disease of constipation.

12. Another solid cure for the disease of the constipation is the intake of the hot water by adding salt and lime juice which is sour.

13. For getting instant relief from the disease of the constipation, intake one spoon of desiccated peach blossoms in a hot cup of milk which is boiled and it should be taken two times in a day.

14. Another solid cure for the disease of the constipation

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/general-health-articles/constipation-symptoms-natural-home-treatment-constipation-pain-148980.html


food for lupus patients

6 thoughts on “Food For Lupus Patients

  1. sekhmet179

    What are the four stages of treatment for lupus?
    I remember reading somewhere that there were four stages of treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus I think it was like
    I-corticosteroids
    II-?
    III-?
    IV-Immunosuppressors, chemotherapy, etc

    I was wondering if there was anything like this on the internet or whether I am confusing it with the kidney affected stages? (I doubt it but you never know…)

    Thanks in advance for any info, and please be sure to set up a link to where you got your info

    1. Cheryl M

      What is the treatment for systemic lupus?

      There is no permanent cure for SLE. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms and protect organs by decreasing inflammation and/or the level of autoimmune activity in the body. Many patients with mild symptoms may need no treatment or only intermittent courses of antiinflammatory medications. Those with more serious illness involving damage to internal organ(s) may require high doses of corticosteroids in combination with other medications that suppress the body’s immune system.

      Patients with SLE need more rest during periods of active disease. Researchers have reported that poor sleep quality was a significant factor in developing fatigue in patients with SLE. These reports emphasize the importance for patients and physicians to address sleep quality and the effect of underlying depression, lack of exercise, and self-care coping strategies on overall health. During these periods, carefully prescribed exercise is still important to maintain muscle tone and range of motion in the joints.

      Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are helpful in reducing inflammation and pain in muscles, joints, and other tissues. Examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn), and sulindac (Clinoril). Since the individual response to NSAIDs varies among patients, it is common for a doctor to try different NSAIDs to find the most effective one with the fewest side effects. The most common side effects are stomach upset, abdominal pain, ulcers, and even ulcer bleeding. NSAIDs are usually taken with food to reduce side effects. Sometimes, medications that prevent ulcers while taking NSAIDs, such as misoprostol (Cytotec), are given simultaneously.

      Corticosteroids are more potent than NSAIDs in reducing inflammation and restoring function when the disease is active. Corticosteroids are particularly helpful when internal organs are involved. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, injected directly into the joints and other tissues, or administered intravenously. Unfortunately, corticosteroids have serious side effects when given in high doses over prolonged periods, and the doctor will try to monitor the activity of the disease in order to use the lowest doses that are safe. Side effects of corticosteroids include weight gain, thinning of the bones and skin, infection, diabetes, facial puffiness, cataracts, and death (necrosis) of large joints.

      Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) is an antimalarial medication found to be particularly effective for SLE patients with fatigue, skin, and joint disease. Side effects include diarrhea, upset stomach, and eye pigment changes. Eye pigment changes are rare, but require monitoring by an ophthalmologist (eye specialist) during treatment with Plaquenil. Researchers have found that Plaquenil significantly decreased the frequency of abnormal blood clots in patients with systemic SLE. Moreover, the effect seemed independent of immune suppression, implying that Plaquenil can directly act to prevent the blood clots. This fascinating work highlights an important reason for patients and doctors to consider Plaquenil, especially for those SLE patients who are at some risk for blood clots in veins and arteries, such as those with phospholipid antibodies (cardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, and false positive VDRL). This means not only that Plaquenil reduces the chance for reflares of SLE, but it can also be beneficial in ‘thinning’ the blood to prevent abnormal excessive blood clotting.

      For resistant skin disease, other antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine (Aralen) or quinacrine, are considered, and can be used in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative medications for skin disease include dapsone and retinoic acid (Retin-A). Retin-A is often effective for an uncommon wart-like form of lupus skin disease. For more severe skin disease, immunosuppressive medications are considered as below.

      Medications that suppress immunity (immunosuppressive medications) are also called cytotoxic drugs. Immunosuppressive medications are used for treating patients with more severe manifestations of SLE with damage to internal organ(s). Examples of immunosuppressive medications include methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall), azathioprine (Imuran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), chlorambucil (Leukeran), and cyclosporine (Sandimmune). All immunosuppressive medications can seriously depress blood cell counts and increase risks of infection and bleeding. Other side effects are peculiar for each drug. For examples, Rheumatrex can cause liver toxicity, while Sandimmune can impair kidney function.

      In recent years, mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) has been used as an effective medication for lupus, particularly when it associated with kidney disease. Cellcept has been helpful in reversing active lupus kidney disease (lupus renal disease) and in maintaining remission after it is established. It’s lower side effect profile has advantage over traditional immune suppression medications.

      In SLE patients with serious brain or kidney disease, plasmapheresis is sometimes used to remove antibodies and other immune substances from the blood to suppress immunity. Some SLE patients can develop seriously low platelet levels, thereby increasing the risk of excessive and spontaneous bleeding. Since the spleen is believed to be the major site of platelet destruction, surgical removal of the spleen is sometimes performed to improve platelet levels. Other treatments have included plasmapheresis and the use of male hormones. Plasmapheresis has also been used to remove proteins (cryoglobulins) that can lead to vasculitis. Endstage kidney damage from SLE requires dialysis and/or a kidney transplant.

      Most recent research is indicating benefits of rituximab (Rituxan) in treating lupus. Rituximab is an intravenously infused antibody that suppresses a particular white blood cell, the B cell, by decreasing their number in the circulation. B cells have been found to play a central role in lupus activity, and when they are suppressed, the disease tends toward remission.

      At the 2007 national Rheumatology meeting, there was a paper presented suggesting that low dose dietary supplementation with omega-3 fish oils could help patients with lupus by decreasing disease activity and possibly decreasing heart disease risk.

  2. RH

    What is a good diet regimen for a lupus patient to follow? What foods should be avoided?
    I would like to know what foods to stay away from and what foods may help people diagnosed with autoimmune diseases. What is a good diet regimen for this diagnosis? Are there any foods that are harmful or that should be totally avoided by lupus patients?

    1. Linda R

      Lupus patients should avoid alfalfa sprouts. They stimulate the immune system, just the opposite of what we need.

      Outside of that, here are some basic guidelines that work for me.

      1. Eat lots, and I mean lots, of fresh fruits and vegetables
      2. Limit or eliminate animal fat. We have a high rate of premature atherosclerosis. A healthy heart diet is essential.
      3. Limit processed foods
      4. Eat plenty of fiber (#1 will accomplish that)
      5. Get regular mild to moderat exercise-it improves immune function, lubricates joints and elevates mood. Ask your rheumy what would be good for you.
      6. Do not take echinacea or goldenseal. They also stimulate immune system.
      7. Some lupus patients find wheat gluten to be inflammatory, but many of us have no problem with it.
      8. If you can’t pronounce the ingredients, don’t put it in your mouth.
      9. Fish oil is anti-inflammatory. You can eat cold water fish like salmon to get that. A small amount of nuts is good, too.
      10. Make sure you get plenty of calcium. Our meds make us prone to osteoporosis. Exercise helps with that, too.

  3. LULU

    Is there a special diet for people with Lupus? Can you provide me with a diet on what and not to eat?

    My primary medical doctor let it slip out that I had lupus so now she is sending me to see Endo and Rhematoid doctors. However, my allergy doctor told me that he thinks I have is SLE. I once had long hair and now I am bald, yes bald. They tell me that I’m in Chronic Renal Failure. So I’m mainly trying to get a head start on these doctor when they hit me with the news.

    1. Linda R

      Your primary probably wanted to confirm the diagnosis with a rheumatologist. Lupus is hard to diagnose.

      There is no special diet but there are some sensible guidelines that are very helpful.

      1. Avoid fast and processed foods. Your body is having a hard enough time without giving it empty calories or a bunch of chemical additives.
      2. Eat at least 5 servings of fruits and veggies a day
      3. Keep your animal fat intake minimal or non-existent. We are at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, so don’t help that along.
      4. Eat cold water fish like salmon-the omega3 helps with inflammation and that helps with pain
      5. Get enough calcium, especially if you are on prednisone and plalquenil because those increase your likelihood of osteoporosis
      6. Avoid meats that have been given antibiotics and growth hormones (this is all the usual meat in the grocery store, buy meats that have a label saying they are free of these things)
      7. Stay out of the sun. The sun not only causes lupus skin issues but can cause flares in the organs like kidneys.
      8. Learn stress management techniques. Stress makes lupus worse.
      9. Get some regular, mild to moderate exercise every day. Even if it’s only 5 minutes.
      10. Learn all you can about lupus so you can be a proactive patient.

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