Sometimes a Systemic Yeast Infection can have light symptoms, and because of this they're dismissed as nothing to concerned about. The problem is, this allows the yeast to enter the bloodstream where a lot of different problems can eventuate and can even become a life-threatening situation.

The body naturally has a certain amount of yeast that lives in the body in small quantities and actually help the body, without doing any harm to it. There are also different types of microorganisms inside the body that are there to keep the yeast in check so an infection does not occur.

On-going stress attacks, poor choices of food, normal pregnancy changes, immune system deficiency diseases, antibiotic medications and other disease may abolish the tiny microorganisms and thereby allow the Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms to rage.

The Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms can differ from each individual, but here a few of the most usual ones:

Heavy sense of exhaustion and unusual run down feelings may arise.

1. The feelings of sensory disturbances, unusual muscle aches and pains, continual headaches, constant dizziness, and complaints of the sufferering of persistent tiredness are signs of a person with Systemic Yeast Infection.

2. Unusual or sudden sensitivity to chemicals or new food allergies.
Arising troubles which haven't occurred before with several chemicals or foods are common with those suffering from Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms.

3. Problems with the gastrointestinal tract.

On many occasions, as touched on in the previous detail of the food allergies, flatulence, inflammatory bowel disease, rectal itching, constipation, and diarrhea are the most common of the Symptoms.

It is even possible for thrush, a Yeast Infection affecting the mouth and/or throat, to develop.

4. Onset of urinary and genital problems.

5. Development of hives and skin rashes.

You could even be having a case of hives, and not know where they came from.

6. Suddenly feeling irritable or mildly depressed.

Many times people complain of Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms that include: mental confusion, feeling of being in a 'fog', difficulty focusing or concentrating, sleepness nights, memory loss, and decreased attention span.

7. Problems with the autoimmune system.

Some autoimmune disorders that normally become worse from a Systemic Yeast Infection are sarcoidosis, scleroderma, myasthenia gravis, arthritis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Yeast flourish on a body that is fed with sugar, refined starch, and chemical additives.
These chemicals, starches and sugars are also readily present in bread, cookies, chips and other junk foods which are a large part of many peoples diets.

When someone is under immense stress, the microorganisms in the body that control the yeast start to die off.

Anytime you think you may have a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms, you need to check with your doctor about what tests need to be run to determine what your body's level of Yeast organism is.
All in all, remember that it's vital to know if you are dealing with a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms so you can get the proper treatment.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/women-health-articles/systemic-yeast-infection-symptoms-7-signs-watch-out-464763.html


info on lupus symptoms

14 thoughts on “Info On Lupus Symptoms

  1. Melanie P

    Anyone have Lupus or know any information on it?
    I have been living with the diagnosis for 7 years. The medications seem to make me more sick? Does anyone know of any meds that actually made them feel better. Right now my symptoms are swollen, sore joints. Fatigue. Uncontrolled diarrhea. And hair loss. Anyone with experience? I am taking plaquenil, silica and prednisone but things seem to be getting worse. My C3 and C4 complements are very low. Any suggestions?

    1. sarge

      I’m sorry you are suffering with this disease. My daughter has had lupus for about 15 years. There is some exciting new study going on involving Cytoxan. Contact Drexel University School of Medicine in Philadelphia, Medical College of Wisconsin or John Hopkins Medical Center. Contact the Lupus Center at (410)614-1573 for info or email them at stdman@jhmi.edu. God bless you.

  2. sekhmet179

    What are the four stages of treatment for lupus?
    I remember reading somewhere that there were four stages of treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus I think it was like
    I-corticosteroids
    II-?
    III-?
    IV-Immunosuppressors, chemotherapy, etc

    I was wondering if there was anything like this on the internet or whether I am confusing it with the kidney affected stages? (I doubt it but you never know…)

    Thanks in advance for any info, and please be sure to set up a link to where you got your info

    1. Cheryl M

      What is the treatment for systemic lupus?

      There is no permanent cure for SLE. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms and protect organs by decreasing inflammation and/or the level of autoimmune activity in the body. Many patients with mild symptoms may need no treatment or only intermittent courses of antiinflammatory medications. Those with more serious illness involving damage to internal organ(s) may require high doses of corticosteroids in combination with other medications that suppress the body’s immune system.

      Patients with SLE need more rest during periods of active disease. Researchers have reported that poor sleep quality was a significant factor in developing fatigue in patients with SLE. These reports emphasize the importance for patients and physicians to address sleep quality and the effect of underlying depression, lack of exercise, and self-care coping strategies on overall health. During these periods, carefully prescribed exercise is still important to maintain muscle tone and range of motion in the joints.

      Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are helpful in reducing inflammation and pain in muscles, joints, and other tissues. Examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn), and sulindac (Clinoril). Since the individual response to NSAIDs varies among patients, it is common for a doctor to try different NSAIDs to find the most effective one with the fewest side effects. The most common side effects are stomach upset, abdominal pain, ulcers, and even ulcer bleeding. NSAIDs are usually taken with food to reduce side effects. Sometimes, medications that prevent ulcers while taking NSAIDs, such as misoprostol (Cytotec), are given simultaneously.

      Corticosteroids are more potent than NSAIDs in reducing inflammation and restoring function when the disease is active. Corticosteroids are particularly helpful when internal organs are involved. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, injected directly into the joints and other tissues, or administered intravenously. Unfortunately, corticosteroids have serious side effects when given in high doses over prolonged periods, and the doctor will try to monitor the activity of the disease in order to use the lowest doses that are safe. Side effects of corticosteroids include weight gain, thinning of the bones and skin, infection, diabetes, facial puffiness, cataracts, and death (necrosis) of large joints.

      Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) is an antimalarial medication found to be particularly effective for SLE patients with fatigue, skin, and joint disease. Side effects include diarrhea, upset stomach, and eye pigment changes. Eye pigment changes are rare, but require monitoring by an ophthalmologist (eye specialist) during treatment with Plaquenil. Researchers have found that Plaquenil significantly decreased the frequency of abnormal blood clots in patients with systemic SLE. Moreover, the effect seemed independent of immune suppression, implying that Plaquenil can directly act to prevent the blood clots. This fascinating work highlights an important reason for patients and doctors to consider Plaquenil, especially for those SLE patients who are at some risk for blood clots in veins and arteries, such as those with phospholipid antibodies (cardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, and false positive VDRL). This means not only that Plaquenil reduces the chance for reflares of SLE, but it can also be beneficial in ‘thinning’ the blood to prevent abnormal excessive blood clotting.

      For resistant skin disease, other antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine (Aralen) or quinacrine, are considered, and can be used in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative medications for skin disease include dapsone and retinoic acid (Retin-A). Retin-A is often effective for an uncommon wart-like form of lupus skin disease. For more severe skin disease, immunosuppressive medications are considered as below.

      Medications that suppress immunity (immunosuppressive medications) are also called cytotoxic drugs. Immunosuppressive medications are used for treating patients with more severe manifestations of SLE with damage to internal organ(s). Examples of immunosuppressive medications include methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall), azathioprine (Imuran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), chlorambucil (Leukeran), and cyclosporine (Sandimmune). All immunosuppressive medications can seriously depress blood cell counts and increase risks of infection and bleeding. Other side effects are peculiar for each drug. For examples, Rheumatrex can cause liver toxicity, while Sandimmune can impair kidney function.

      In recent years, mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) has been used as an effective medication for lupus, particularly when it associated with kidney disease. Cellcept has been helpful in reversing active lupus kidney disease (lupus renal disease) and in maintaining remission after it is established. It’s lower side effect profile has advantage over traditional immune suppression medications.

      In SLE patients with serious brain or kidney disease, plasmapheresis is sometimes used to remove antibodies and other immune substances from the blood to suppress immunity. Some SLE patients can develop seriously low platelet levels, thereby increasing the risk of excessive and spontaneous bleeding. Since the spleen is believed to be the major site of platelet destruction, surgical removal of the spleen is sometimes performed to improve platelet levels. Other treatments have included plasmapheresis and the use of male hormones. Plasmapheresis has also been used to remove proteins (cryoglobulins) that can lead to vasculitis. Endstage kidney damage from SLE requires dialysis and/or a kidney transplant.

      Most recent research is indicating benefits of rituximab (Rituxan) in treating lupus. Rituximab is an intravenously infused antibody that suppresses a particular white blood cell, the B cell, by decreasing their number in the circulation. B cells have been found to play a central role in lupus activity, and when they are suppressed, the disease tends toward remission.

      At the 2007 national Rheumatology meeting, there was a paper presented suggesting that low dose dietary supplementation with omega-3 fish oils could help patients with lupus by decreasing disease activity and possibly decreasing heart disease risk.

  3. earthling

    Is it true that most people parasites and toxic gunk in their bodies?
    A woman I know recently told me about a detoxification program she went through when she had graves disease and all the disgusting things that came out of her body…I have lupus and kidney disease and would like to do a detox but I’m not sure what kind of program I need to go on….your thoughts?
    typo: is it true that most people HAVE parasites….etc.

    1. hiphiphooray

      I believe that a detox can help.

      I’m actually on one right now to get all the excess synthetic hormones (from birth control stopped 5 months ago), toxins, and built up colon matter.

      BTW, to the 2 posters who are asking what “toxins” are… There are so many, that natural health companies probably can’t list them all, and there’s that small problem of the government and Big Pharma controlling what they put on their labels. They can’t claim it helps anything, as no one besides the natural health company makes any profit from it, and Big Pharma can’t patent it. Toxins include pesticides, air pollution breathed, and any other synthetic particles that aren’t supposed to be in your system. As well, most people do not have normal bowel movements, especially people with constipation. Most of your body’s toxins are released from your body through the colon (through feces). When you’re constipated, it allow toxins in the feces to be reabsorbed into your bloodstream, as your bowels aren’t moving as fast.

      Most skeptics have never experienced a cleanse before. Only 2 weeks into my cleanse, I already feel a difference. The only difference that I can notice right now is my libido change (sorry for the personal info, but it has to be explained). I used to have perfectly fine sexual health, until I started birth control pills 4 years ago. After going through 5 brands of birth control pills, having: no libido, migraines, severe GAD (caused by the BCP’s), and the onset of menopause (also the cause of BCP, I’m in my early 20’s, the ‘menopause’ symptoms stopped when I stopped the pills). Even after stopping my birth control, I didn’t find any change in my sexual health/libido. Only now, taking my cleanse, I’m finally noticing a BIG difference!

      As for which detox you want to take, anything that cleanses the kidneys I guess, which is almost all of them.
      The cleanse I’m taking right now is called Cleanse Smart by Renew Life. It cleanses the 7 channels of elimination: lungs, blood, liver, kidneys, colon, skin, and lymphatic system.
      Another cleanse that is really popular is Colonix.

      Hope this helps!
      Good luck with your cleanse.

  4. JENNIFER

    Why would my doctor order a Lupus Profile with no family history of Lupus?
    My doctor has used diagnosis codes for Neuritis and Vertigo, and ordered a Lupus Profile and ANA w/ Reflex.

  5. momzpeachy

    need some help understanding MS? How often are the flare ups and how does it get diagnosed?
    I had an MRI done early February due to neck and arm pain. That was of the brain and showed no lesions. Since that MRI ..I had a major flare of pain all over and all kinds of symptoms that go along with MS. My vision got blurry and nlood pressure raised. I was a real mess. I was told by the neurologist that since that MRI was negative there is no chance I have MS. I had those symptoms for a few weeks and now I am better. It’s really weird how it all went away. Except for the vision part…I still have blurry and distorted vision. Flourescent light drives me nuts!

    I am quite concerned as to whether the neurologist could be wrong. I was also told it could possibly be lupus but all the blood work came back negative.

    I’m wondering if some of you might be able to help me and guide me in a direction. I am seeing a rheumatologist tomorrow but not sure that’s the right doctor to see. What other tests need to be done and who orders them?

  6. julie

    What kind of Neurological symptoms do you have with Lupus?
    I’m being tested for lupus after being sick for 2 yrs and I have tons of neurological symptoms just wondering if these are common symptoms for lupus. here are my symptoms.
    Burning stinging headaches, dizzy, lightheaded,vertigo, seizure type incidents, sharp shooting pains in head, also get weard sensations on my body like warm water pouring on me. Any info will be appreciated. If you have any neurological symptoms from Lupus pleas list them for me. Thanks!

    1. Linda R

      Some lupus patients have neurological symptoms, some do not. Lupus symptoms vary widely from patient to patient.

      Headaches could be caused by lupus or by Raynaud’s phenomenon or other things. Many lupus patients have Raynaud’s, a condition in which stress or cool temperatures cause the nerves to tell the blood vessels to clamp down and restrict blood flow, usually to hands and feet, but can also cause headaches.

      Lightheadedness can be caused by a number of things as well. Lupus patient are often anemic, When you are anemica, there is not enough available oxygen in your blood, which could account for light headedness or dizziness.

      Vertigo usually has to do with the inner ear. Lupus can cause inflammation anywhere, including the inner ear.

      I am not sure what you mean my “seizure type” incidents. Do you lose consciousness? Do you convulse? Some lupus patients do have seizures. But seizures can be caused by many other things.

      Lupus patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (sticky blood) which causes clots may have TIAs or ministrokes. This could account for your head pain and seizure type incidents. Ask to have your blood tested for this.

      As for the weird sensations, please find a clearer way to describe that as well. If you tell the doctor that you have “seizure type incidents” and “weird sensations on your body” you are not helping the doctor get to the root cause of your problem. If these weird sensations are painful, you could have neuropathy which sometimes comes with lupus, or diabtetes, or multiple sclerosis, or other things.

      As a patient your job is to give the doctor the best and clearest information possible. It is the doctor’s job to connect the dots. A diagnosis of lupus is made based on family history, your medical history, a wide variety of lab tests and after everything else is ruled out. There is no definitive lab test for lupus.

      To do your job, keep a symptom journal including
      1. a clear description of the symptom
      2. when it started
      3. how often it happens
      4. how long it lasts
      5. what makes it feel better
      6. what makes it feel worse
      7. to what degree does it interfere with your activities of daily living

      Then create a concise summary and bring a copy for your doc and a copy for you.

  7. Ladybug

    My sister was told by three doctors that she may have lupus. Can anyone give any addvice?
    The three doctors tha have suggested lupus are: general doctor, gyno, and a hypertension doctor ( for kideney issues).

    they are sending her for all kinds for tests. i have tried to read up on it and i can’t understan it to much, anyone with lupus or info on it can you help?
    is lupus genetic?

    1. Linda R

      Researchers have identified some genes involved in lupus, but that is not enough to make somebody develop the disease. It also needs a trigger or triggers. The cause of lupus is not known, there are some suspected triggers but more research is needed.

      There is no single test that diagnoses lupus. Many patients take years to finally put a name with what is bothering them. Doctors do some tests. See what comes back and that tells them where they might look next.

      Lupus is diagnosed based on medical history, symptoms, a wide variety of lab tests and after ruling everything else out.

  8. cass

    How do you keep a job when you have Lupus?
    I am off sick at the moment and the local council I work for has a strict sickness policy.When I get back to work I will have a final warning against me and could loose my job. I have appealed against the warnings in the past, but have been told that unless I am actually dying! the warnings stand.Lupus and arithitis is not recognised by them as a chronic long term condition. I am on my own and need to work to pay the bills!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *