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Abscess
Acid Reflux
Acidosis
Acne
Addictions
Addison’s Disease
Adrenal Disorders
Adrenoleukodystrophy
(ALD)
Age Spots
Aging
AIDS
Allergies
Alopecia (Baldness)
ALS
Alzheimer’s Disease
Amenorrhea
Anaphylaxis
Anemia
Anger
Anxiety
Arteriosclerosis
Arthritis
Asthma
Athletes Foot
Attention Deficit Disorder
Autism
Back Pain
Balance Problems
Blackheads Acne
Bladder Cancer
Bladder Problems
Blisters
Body Odor & Bad Breath
Bone Cancer
Bone Spurs
Bowel Problems
Brain Cancer
Brain Injury
Breast Cancer
Breast Problems
Bronchitis
Bruising
Bursitis
Cancer
Cancer of Cervix
Candida – Candidacies
Cardiovascular Disease
Carpal Tunnel Syndrome
Celiac Disease
Cellulite
Cellulitis
Chemotherapy Side-effects
Chlamydia
Cholesterol Problems
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Chronic Pulmonary Disease
Circulatory Problems
Cold Sores
Colic
Colon Cancer
Common Cold
Constipation
Cough
Cohn’s Disease
Cystic Acne
Cystic Fibrosis
Cysts
Dandruff
Depression
Dermatitis
Dermatitis herpetiformis
Diabetes
Diarrhea
Diverticulitis
Diverticulosis
Drug Addiction
Dry Skin
Ear Problems
Eczema
Edema
Emphysema
Endocrine Disorders
Endometriosis
Energy Problems
Environmental Toxicity
Epilepsy
Esophagus Cancer
Eye Pain
Eye Problems
Eyes (Bags under)
Eyes (Bloodshot)
Eyes (Dry)
Eyes (Itchy)
Eyes (Mucus)
Eyes (Tired)
Eyestrain
Face Pain
Facial Paralysis
Fatigue
Fatty / Enlarged Liver

Fever
Fever Blisters
Fibromyalgia
Flu
Folliculitis
Folliculitis Alopecia
Folliculitis Decalvans
Capillitii
Food allergy
Food Poisoning
Frozen Shoulder
Fungal Infection
Fungal Skin Infections
Gall bladder Cancer
Gallstones
Gangrene
GERD – Gastro-Esophageal
Reflux
Glaucoma
Gout
Gum Problems
Gynecological Problems
Hair Disorders/Loss
Hay Fever
Headache
Hearing Loss
Heart Attack
Heart Disease
Heartburn
Hemorrhoids
Hepatitis A
Hepatitis B
Hepatitis C
Hernia
Herpes
Hiatal Hernia
Hiccups
High Liver Enzymes
HIV
Hodgkin’s disease
Hormonal Acne
Hormone Imbalance
Hot Flashes
Huntington’s Disease
Hyperactivity
Hypertension
Hyperthyroidism
Hypoglycemia
Hypothyroidism
Immune Dysfunction
Impetigo
Impotence
Infertility
Inflammation
Inflammatory Bowel Disease
Injured Muscles
Insomnia
Intertrigo
Intrahepatic Stones
Iridocyclitis
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Jaundice
Jet Lag
Kidney Cancer
Kidney Problems
Kidney Stones
Knee Pain
Lactose Intolerance
Leaky Gut Syndrome
Learning Disorders
Leg Cramps
Leg Ulcers
Leukemia
Leucorrhea
Lichen Planus
Lichen Sclerosis
Liver & Gallbladder Problems
Liver Cancer
Liver Stones
Low Blood Pressure
Low Blood Sugar
Lung Cancer
Lung Disease
Lupus
Lyme Disease
Macular Degeneration
Malabsorption Syndrome
Malnutrition
Mastitis
Mastocytosis
Melanoma Cancer
Memory Problems
Menopause Problems
Menstruation Problems
Migraine
Mineral Deficiency
Moles
Mood Swings
Mouth Cancer
Multiple Chemical
Sensitivity

Multiple Sclerosis
Muscle Pain
Muscle Weakness
Myocardial Infarction
Nail Problems
Narcolepsy
Nausea
Neck Problems
Nerve Damage
Nervousness
Neuropathy
Nodular or Severe Cystic Acne
Non-Hodkins Lymphoma
Nosebleed
Obesity
Oily Skin
Osteoporosis
Ovarian Cancer
Overweight
Pain
Pancreas Cancer
Pancreas Problems
Panic Disorder
Parasites
Parasites Intestinal
Parkinson’s Disease
Personality Disorder
Phemhigus
Phobias
Pilonidal Disease
Pimples (Acne)
Pityriasis Rosea
PMS
Pneumonia
Polyps
Post-polio Syndrome
Pregnancy Problems
Primary Sclerosing
Cholangitis
Prostate Cancer
Prostate Problems
Psoriasis
Psoriasis
Pulmonary Fibrosis
Radiation Sickness
Respiratory Ailments
Rheumatism
Rickets
Rosacea
Sarcoma Cancer
Schizophrenia
Sciatica
Scleroderma
Scoliosis
Senility
Sexual Dysfunction
Sexual Problems
Shoulder Pain
Sinus Problems
Skin Problems
Skin Rash
Sleep Disorders
Snakebite
Snoring
Spider Bite
Spinal Disorders
Sports Injuries
Stomach Cancer
Stomach Problems
Stroke
Testical Cancer
Thyroid Cancer
Thyroid Problems
Thyroiditis
Tinea
Tinea Capitis
Tinnitus
Tongue Cancer
Tooth Decay
Toxemia
Toxicity
Tuberculosis
Tumors
Ulcer
Ulcerative Colitis/Colitis
Underweight
Urinary Tract Infections
Urination Problems
Vaginal Cancer
Vaginitis
Varicose Veins
Vertigo
Vision Problems
Vitamin Deficiency
Vomiting
Vulvitis
Warts
Whiteheads Acne
Worms
Wrinkled Skin – Wrinkles
Yeast Infection


78 thoughts on “Lupus Disease Cures

  1. Husky 1

    Are there any cures for the lupus disease?
    We think my friend may have lupus and I was wondering if there was any way to completely rid him of the disease. He wants to go to the Air Force and he may not pass the physical to do combat. If there is a cure, I am interested in the cost of the cure. Can someone please help us here? It would be really appreciated.

    1. Boɳɛs

      No, it is an incurable autoimmune disease. There are treatments, but no cure.

      I’m sorry but the Air Force is not going to let your friend in.

  2. Carol H

    Who knows about LUPUS disease.? I know there are several different categories of Lupus.?
    First I started going to a specialist about my kidneys. There are small problems there. now they are double checking me for Lupus. Is there no cure for this disease? I am seeing a neprologist and he sees alot of patients in 1 day. He is the only specialist around my area. Please need the true facts on Lupus disease.

    1. Kat

      I’m sorry to tell you that there is no cure for lupus. There are several ways doctors work to help prevent flare ups, pain, and any further damage but there is no actual way to rid your body of it completely. Fortunately, most people with Lupus are able to go on and live a basically normal life and have the same life expectancy as anybody else does.

      Lupus presents itself in many ways and is often the go to diagnosis when doctors don’t really know what’s going on. If you are diagnosed with Lupus, I suggest you insist your doctor go over all the other possibilities as there are several other disease that can appear to be Lupus.

      Good luck and I hope you are not unfortunate enough to be diagnosed with it.

  3. Omega

    This is a toughy. Are their any natural cures for Lupus DLE and SLE? ?
    Lupus is an Autoimmune disease that triggers inflammation of tissue, joints and organs. Most Orthodox and conventional doctors say their isn’t a cure. However it has been suggested that Omega 3 acids help inflammation. Is their any other suggestions for this disease without having to rely on pharmaceutical drugs? Is there a cure?

  4. bluguy57

    Does AIDS “Cure” Autoimmune Diseases?
    I use the word “cure” loosely. Since AIDS destroys the immune system there would be no immune system to attack, so would that mean the autoimmune disease would go away. For example if someone has lupus, an example of an autoimmune disorder and then gets AIDS(fullblown AIDS) would the symptoms of lupus go away since there would not be an immune system left to attack the body. (Of course this “cure” would be worse than the disease)

  5. Mandy Cakes

    This is a lot to ask, I know. But if someone could review my APA paper I would GREATLY appreciate it. ?
    I think my greatest problem is with grammer errors and my in-text citations. Also, all of those citations that repeat themselves look funny to me. They can’t be right? Can they? I’m also confused with secondary citations. I think they’re a no no but I can’t get a clear answer on what they are. Here’s the paper. Please kindly review if you’d like. I’d love yah for it.

    Kisses
    Mandi

    (Title page not included)

    Introduction
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that permits the affected body to build antibodies to attack its own cells as if they were foreign. There are three main types of lupus. They are discoid, drug induced, and Systemic lupus erythematosus (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Doctors must be careful in diagnosing lupus since it can easily be confused with other diseases (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Lupus is capable of attacking any part of the body but for the most part it mainly affects the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The cause of Lupus is currently unknown. Lupus truly is a sickness of mystery since the cause and cure have currently been unidentified. However, there are known genetic (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) and environmental (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008) aspects that have been known to trigger this illness. On an inspiring note, there is presently a study being conducted with mice in search for the cure of lupus.

    Discussion
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that is known to be a chronic (continuous or reoccurring) inflammatory illness that has the ability to attack any region of the body (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The symptoms of the disease are painful or swollen joints and muscle pain, unexplained fever, red rashes, chest pain when breathing deeply, loss of hair, pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress (also known as Raynaud’s phenomenon), sensitivity to the sun swelling in legs or around eyes, mouth ulcers, swollen glands and extreme fatigue (WebMD, 2008). Those that suffer from lupus may never have the same symptoms as another person with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). However, the most common areas of the body affected are the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).. Also in most cases in order for a doctor to diagnose lupus the patient must illustrate at least four (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) of the listed symptoms.
    The actual cause of the disease is unknown. However, there are genetic and environmental characteristics that could trigger lupus to develop. Many patients that suffer from lupus have a genetic association with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Lupus could be the result of mutated genes of interferon and the genes that play vital roles in regulating the immune response (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). If a patient has a genetic link to lupus there are also environmental aspects that could trigger lupus. They are infection, ultraviolet light, certain drugs like; procainamide, hydralazine, and quinidine (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008), and extreme stress (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Factors that potentially contribute to the progression of lupus are interleukins and interferons (immune molecules). Interleukins and interferons have been shown to control the autoantibody release in response to certain bodily stimuli (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).
    Lupus commonly affects women, African Americans, and Asians more than any other group (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Since 90% of all patients with lupus are female, women between the ages of 15-50 should be tested for lupus if they portray at least one of the symptoms (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Also, there is an increased risk of lupus in people who already have the Epstein-Barr virus. (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008)
    The healthy immune system’s mission is to protect the body from infections and foreign objects within the body. When the immune system is working properly it will recognize the foreign bacteria, virus, or objects as non-self. Upon recognition that something does not belong, it will build antibodies against the unwanted agent, attack and destroy it (Marieb, 2009, p. 408 & 410). However, the activities of the immune system are much different when the body is affected with lupus. Instead of the body producing antibodies against foreign bacterial that do not belong, the immune system will produce an autoantibody that attacks the body’s own cells and tissues. The reason for this is because they can not recognize their own cells or tissue as self. When an autoantibody attack occurs, the autoantibodies will attach themselves to various tissues and cells (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). When this happens the body’s inflammatory response occurs. The same thing happens when we have been hurt and the tissue has truly been damaged.
    There are a few different ways Lupus can affect the body, for example in nearly all individuals that suffer from lup

    1. mgunnycappo

      It’s a pretty good paper but in the beginning you made an error. There are four types of Lupus. Neo Natal (babies), Drug Induced, Discoid and Systemic. Then after that you should state that your paper is talking about Systemic Lupus because they symptoms you go on to describe are those of Systemic Lupus. Your citings follow the APA guidelines. I couldn’t see the entire paper as it got cut off. Also couldn’t see your works cited page. You don’t show any quotation marks so I’m assuming that you didn’t plagerize any of the information directly from the material.

  6. Donny N

    How can we cure Systemic Lupus Erythematosus? (SLE) – or known as Lupus diseases?

    Will it worsen if someone with Lupus getting older?
    If there’s no cure, is there any known ways to fight this immune disease?
    I heard of controlled diet can lead to a better life with Lupus, is that works?
    Are there any certain foods that someone with Lupus cannot take? or maybe recommended to be taken?

    1. mnvikes

      there is no cure. in lupus, your immune system attacks your own body for some reason, so its managed with immunosuppressant drugs to slow the progression of the disease.

  7. VERSAILLES

    My sister just found out she has Lupus..What will happen now?
    She was referred to a specialist…what’s he going to tell her? Is she dying or is this disease like diabetes(where it can be treated easily or even cured)?

    1. christibro40

      Hi I am so sorry to hear she has lupus. I do and have had it since I was about 13 or 14. However, it was the early 80’s, before the diagnostic critera even came out and drs knew much. I am now 40, and have had some serious what are called falres (periods of activitiy). I can tell you, the specilist she will see will be a rheumotologist, the most important partner in her team. I went through a few toads until I fornd my Queen. She has kept me alive, she keeps me complient, or she comes down on me big time, and cares. I sure hope she has several drs in taht field to choose from, because in the end it comes down to personalitites meshing well.
      I can tell you this much. Lupus used to be a death sentance within maybe 10 years for severe cases. that is no longer the truth. The medical advances made in just the last 15 years have been astounding, and I have seen the changes, so have been the doctors knowledge, many continue going to continuing educational resources like Lupus symposiums, seminars etc. I do tend to get insulan dependent diabetic when on certain medications, so I take them as short term as possible. once finsished, I go off. There are so many medication options for the different stages of the autoimmune disease. This, like all autoimmune diseases is not caused by outside invadors, but by what is termed friendly fire. Our bodies, belive it is being attacked by outside invadors (excuse my spelling, im not great, and cognitive is an issue with lupus at times). so our own bodies go into to hyperdrive. and our own cells thinking something is wrong, begin attacking themselves. Lupus can range from mild to severe. I am more on the moderate to severe end. My dr sees me eve ry 3-8 weeks depending on disease activity, now its 4 weeks. a good Rhuemotologist, will do their best to balance pain control, any central nervous system damage, organ damage, and skin damage. there is a wide range of problems associated with SLE, or systemic lupus (therre is also dicoid whic only goes after skin, like the singer seal). For joint, and arthritic problems, the drugs of choice belive it or not are antimalarials. They do help. Early on they helped me. Next for inflammation, some minor organ issues, and to supress the immmune system they use prednison and it cousins (cortisons in the steroid family), they have their side effects, like weight gain, diabetes, and so forth, but for the right people, the help them. Personally and after all my years of experience, I wont take them except when hospitalized. Next step, are mild imunosuppresents, one is called Imuran, and is widely used, I take it now. They give it to Kidney transplant paitents as well. it slows the hyperactivity of our immune systems, thus slowing down activity in many cases. If the flare is more severe, they may use mild chemotherapy agents such as methotrexate. I loved it, my organ involvment is liver, and its hard on the liver so we stopped. next would be drugs like cell cept and cytoxin. both work simarly, I was on the chemo cytoxin for 2 months orally and 3 months IV. while not pleasent. it got rid of my brain inflammation, and worked. There are also meds for specific issesues.

      Lupus like many autoimmunes is not curable as of yet, but controlable, with proper care and and a good medical team, meaning primary, rhuemotologist, and other specialist suited for your sisters needs. many will and do work together, and you may need time forming a team willing and able to share info, and consult as needed.

      I know stress can contribute to the starts of many flares, so she needs as little stress as possible. another thing while there is an official criteria for diagnosing Lupus and you must meet 4 of 11, it was last updated in 1982. over 20 years ago. Ihave moderated and owned online messageboard based support groups. many of our problems go way beyond those 11 critera, like brain fog, female problems (including many hysterectomies at young ages), severe alergies, inability to remeber simple tasks or yesterday, but we can remeber long term. many dr’s feel the critera needs to be updated, hut nothing has been done.

      I know people including my own mother who still works (I do not) in there 60’s going strong. ther can be a genetic componenet, enviromentel, or even a major car accident, with an autoimmune laying dormant that can trigger it. researchers say why the ratio to men to women getting it is so stacked in womens end 90% are feamle, is the estorgen and other hormones. so noone knows for sure.

      I hope I answered some questions.
      no its not an auto death sentance, of the thousand Ive come across2 have died, one I belive in part was morbid obesity (well over 150lbs over), the other lupus so extream, no one could help. pretty low odds.

  8. helen_knott

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), also called simply lupus, is a chronic autoimmune condition in which the body creates antibodies, which instead of protecting the body, attack the body’s connective tissues.

    This causes a variety of symptoms that are different in each person with SLE. The symptoms may flare up intermittently and then become less severe but they rarely disappear completely. There is no way of preventing lupus and no cure.

    The precise cause of SLE is not known, but it is not a contagious disease. It can occur at all ages, but is more common in women of child-bearing age, particularly the teens and early twenties. This is significant because one side-effect of lupus is an increased risk of miscarriage.
    sorry this couldn’t be more positive. I’ve taken this from the NHSdirect website, if your in the UK you can phone NHS direct (08454647) and they will get someone to research particular questions for you for more information.

  9. pamtallglass

    what are so ways i can deal with having lupus without taking medication?
    i have faith and i don’t beleive that God didn’t put cures on this plant if he knew about all the disease that were out here.

    1. Linda R

      Has it occurred to you that autoimmune diseases might be caused by the poor stewardship of the planet? It is not “natural” to have your immune system turn against you. And hydroxycholorquine and the other antimalarials used to treat lupus are derived from plants. Hello!

      Maybe God did not put a cure for lupus on the planet becuase God didn’t cause lupus.

      But believe what you will, untreated lupus can lead to permanent organ damage and premature death. The choice is yours. When you pray for help and God offers it through the skill of scientists and chemist, whose brains God made and the elements with which they work as well, and you deny that help, what do you suppose God thinks of that?

  10. christibro40

    Hi sweetie, well Im a bit, well old enough to be your mom older then you, however I own a lupus support group, and we have two teen girls whos mothers are in the group, one is 18, the other 15, both post occasionally, and I talk to them on the phone, and I belive they talk to each other and email each other. ok about your Lupus. I don’t know how severe it is, but it can go from mild to very severe. Mine is moderate to severe. Id say usually moderate. Ive had it since my teens. Im now almost 40, have a 21 year old, and a 13 year old. right now Im coming out of what is called a flare, and going back to my normal activities. Since I dont have any major organ issues except for my liver, which I do have some control over, I can lead a pretty long normal life.

    I also do not know how you handle the sun, some can, some can’t but if you can’t, you really do need to avoid it, because if you can’t it can bring on a flare. If you have a milder form, you can still go to college and work. I was able to do so until around 30. I may have had periods of being able to return to work, but Im married, and he makes decent money, so we saw no real reason for me to.

    Though most people find they have to modify their lives in some ways I know for a fact you can still have one. Its,all about learning about what your bodies limits are, knowing when it needs rest, when it needs activity, but when to stop, feeding it a decent diet, doing thing you like, going to scheduled dr’s appoitments, taking perscribed medications, and knowing when your getting run down (low grade fevers, swollen glands, overly tired, he small stuff). I have been forunate I found a great rhuemotologist 10 years ago who I can call anytime, and she always calls me within 2 hours. She allows me to explain in full whats up, and allows feedback in what medication that may be most useful.

    honey, this is not the end of your life. The older teen I know, while being rather ill, still gets boys like crazy, goes out, etc, just finished HS. The younger one is looking foward to getting her drivers licence, so you can still have your dreams, and a love life. Life dosent end with this diagnosis, you just have to be clever enough to stay one step ahead of it, but you will be ok.
    good luck
    chris

  11. julia the cat lover

    lupus sle. why do some doctors say this is a terminal disease?
    i have lupus, i take vitamins and occasionally i have to take an antimalarial drug when i have a flareup, also i thought i saw on tv they had isolated the lupus gene or something and their is a possibitlity of a cure has anyone else heard of this?

  12. Knowing

    A question about the disease Lupus?
    I got a packet in the mail from a foundation that is trying to find a cure for Lupus. From the vague information on the information card that I got, it sounds like its a life-threatening disease. Do people with Lupus have a shorter lifespan? Or with proper treatment can you actually live long just like a person without lupus? Is this a common disease? If you’ve been tested positive for auto-immune antibodies and ANA does that mean you have Lupus?

    Sorry for all the questions…it just sounds serious and I would like to donate money to help find a cure for this…thanks!

    1. Linda R

      Dear Knowing,
      I have lupus with organ involvement and it did nearly kill me.
      Lupus can range from mild to life threatening to fatal.
      With regular medical monitoring most lupus patients can expect to live a relatively normal life span.

      Lupus is an autoimmune disease. The exact cause is not known. Researchers believe that a genetic predisposition coupled with a trigger or triggers causes lupus to develop.

      For me, it affected heart, lungs, bone marrow, and kidneys. It was pretty nasty. I will be on toxic medications for life just to try and control it.

      A positive ANA does not mean you have lupus but most lupus patients have a positive ANA. Many other conditions can cause a positive ANA.

      Lupus is more common than you might think. There are a reported 400,000 people with multiple sclerosis, 70,000 people with sickle cell and 30,000 with cystic fibrosis. If you add ALL three together and multiply that number by 3 or 4 you get the number of people with lupus. 1.5 to 2 million. That is 1 in every 170 Americans

      Lupus most often develops in women between the ages of 14 and 45. A mild to moderate case of lupus costs 3,000 to 6,000 a year to control. Most of us cannot hold a full time job and some cannot work at all. Lupus strikes women 9 times more often than men. It strikes women of color 3-4 times more often than Caucasians.

      Half of us have lupus kidney disease. Some of us have types that are untreatable. Some have clotting disorders, called antiphospholipid antibody syndrome that causes heart attacks, strokes and miscarriages. Most of us have premature hardening of the arteries.

      Yes it is a very serious disease. There have been no new medications for lupus since Eisenhower was president. Please do help us. AND click on the take action link at the site provided to encourage your federal legislators to co-sponsor the Lupus REACH amendment.

      Thank you for your help!

  13. mochafreeze2007

    Lupus….???
    What is Lupus? My mom was diagnosed with it and I want to make sure it’s not a serious disease. What exactly is Lupus and how can you cure it??? Please help!

    Thank u for all answers. ;D

    1. Ellen

      Lupus is an autoimmune disease that can affect various parts of the body, including the skin, joints, heart, lungs, blood, kidneys and brain. Normally the body’s immune system makes proteins called antibodies, to protect the body against viruses, bacteria, and other foreign materials. These foreign materials are called antigens.

      In an autoimmune disorder like lupus, the immune system cannot tell the difference between foreign substances and its own cells and tissues. The immune system then makes antibodies directed against itself. These antibodies — called “auto-antibodies” (auto means ‘self’) — cause inflammation, pain and damage in various parts of the body.

      There is no cure for lupus but there are effective treatments available. Learn all you can about your mothers condition so that you will be better informed and more able to help out.

    1. Adam

      It’s not that it’s difficult to cure immune diseases, it’s that it’s hard to cure immune diseases without completely destroying a person’s immunity from every other bacteria, virus, fungus, or parasite out there. Current treatment is basically immunosuppressant therapy.
      The way the immune system works — at least in part — involves these things called antibodies. They’re basically little markers that identify and tag bad cells. Then their buddies from other parts of the immune system come by and gobble up or destroy any tagged cells. The problem with diseases like Lupus, which are properly called autoimmune diseases, is that the body starts making antibodies that identify the body’s own cells as dangerous. The rest of the immune system doesn’t know any better, and they destroy the body’s own cells that were mistakenly marked.
      So the problem is, how do we prevent the body from making antibodies against itself? We can’t — if we prevent the immune system from adapting, we won’t be able to protect ourselves against new bugs that we haven’t encountered yet. We could try removing all the antibodies from the bloodstream, or at least disabling them so they can’t function properly anymore, but that would be really hard to do without destroying antibodies that we need. Ideally, we’d be able to engineer some kind of anti-antibody based on a person’s genetic immune markers (HLAs or MHCs, which tells the immune system whether a cell is foreign or belongs to you) that would disable the self-antibodies while keeping the rest of the immune system working. That might be a possibility in the future, but at the moment it’s very expensive to map out your immune system’s definition of “self”, let alone custom engineer an antibody to the antibodies that misrecognize these ‘self’ proteins.

  14. Delilah :)

    wagners disease.. ? please can someone help me understand it better?
    ok so when i was 9 i was diagnosed with the wagners disease.. am 17 now turning 18 soon and i yet dont really understand my disease doctors say its cronic but i might be able to cure myself as my body finishes developing.. does anybody else have this? and if so how do you live with it ? i know its a rare disease but if someone out there who knows what it is please help me..

    p.s the symptoms go hand in hand with lupus but its not as severe

  15. sexymonica

    if a patient with Lupus ask you if her disease will be cure or when will it b cured, what would you say?
    if a patient with Lupus ask you if her disease will be cure or when will it be cured, what would you say and why ?

  16. sexymonica

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus?
    if a patient with Lupus ask you if her disease will be cure or when will it be cured, what would you say as a nurse and why?

    1. Rita V

      Sexymoni, They will tell you that there is no known cause and no cure, I have this disease and have had it for 19 years, all they can do is treat the symptoms maybe some where in the future there will be a cure, sure hope so. Good Luck Rita V. Go to web md and research lupus it should give you some ideas on the disease.

  17. marscotmo

    I need help for Lupus disease?
    if a patient with Lupus ask you if her disease will be cure or when will it be cured, what would you say as a nurse and why ?

    1. zitdr_02

      You would tell the patient the truth: that there is no cure for the disorder, but that we have medication which is very good at controlling the disorder, so that hopefully it can be kept in check. In addition, you should stress that she should take some responsibility in helping control the disorder, by avoiding sunlight, getting plenty of rest and eating healthy, exercising within limits, and taking the medication as prescribed. In addition, urge her (or him) to join the lupus foundation of america, which is an excellent source for knowledge and support.

  18. Grace

    Please don’t give up. I will keep you in my prayers. I believe in a God that heals even when the doctors say that a disease is incurable. A friend of mine was told that she had ovarian cancer and that she would never have children…..we and many other Christians prayed that Jesus would heal her, and she became pregnant just a few years ago! There is a God who heals out there, His name is Jesus Christ and all you have to do is invite Him into your heart and life and ask Him to heal you. You can pray this prayer sincerely: Lord Jesus, please come into my life and be my Savior and Lord. Please forgive my sins, and give me the gift of eternal life.
    You need the faith and faith comes by the word of God(the bible) meditate on healing scriptures from the Holy Bible and the Lord will heal you if you believe and ask Him to heal you. His will is for you to be healed.
    The Lord healed my grandmother of Lukemia, and he healed my little girl I almost lost her. Don’t worry just put your trust in Jesus and be patient, He will heal you.

  19. sexymonica

    i need help with lupus?
    if a patient with Lupus ask you if her disease will be cure or when will it be cured, what would you say as a nurse and why ?

    1. LK3QA101

      Prognosis and a Hopeful Future
      The idea that lupus is generally a fatal disease is a big misconception. In fact, the prognosis of lupus is much better today than ever before.

      It is true that medical science has not yet developed a method for curing lupus. And some people do die from the disease. However, people with non-organ threatening aspects of lupus can look forward to a normal lifespan if they:

      follow the instructions of their physician,
      take their medication(s) as prescribed, and
      know when to seek help for unexpected side effects of a medication or a new manifestation of their lupus.
      Although some people with lupus have severe recurrent attacks and are frequently hospitalized, most people with lupus rarely require hospitalization. There are many lupus patients who never have to be hospitalized, especially if they are careful and follow their physician’s instructions.

      New research brings unexpected findings each year. The progress made in treatment and diagnosis during the last decade has been greater than that made over the past 100 years. It is therefore a sensible idea to maintain control of a disease that tomorrow may be curable.

      Frequently Asked Questions
      Is there a cure for lupus?
      At the present time there is not a cure for lupus, but there certainly is effective treatment.

      Is lupus a fatal disease?
      Lupus is not a universally fatal disease. In fact, today with close follow-up and treatment, 80-90% of the people with lupus can expect to live a normal life span. Lupus does vary in intensity and degree, however, and there are people who have a mild case, there are those who have a moderate case and there are some who have a severe case of lupus, which tends to be more difficult to treat and bring under control. For people who have a severe flare-up, there is a greater chance that their lupus may be life-threatening. We know that some people do die of this disease and because of that we have a tremendous amount of respect for the potential of this disease. However, the majority of people living with lupus today can expect to live a normal lifespan. People frequently read in the literature that, 80-90% of people with lupus live for more than 10 years. Unfortunately, this is often misinterpreted as people with lupus live for only 10 years.

      Let us clarify this.

      It is important to understand that the “10 years” does not represent the number of years the person will live, but rather the number of years involved in the study. The studies followed patients with lupus from the time of diagnosis for a period of ten years. At the end of this research period they were able to conclude that 80-90% of the people enrolled were still alive. What this study did not look at is what happened in year 11, 12, 15, 20 and so on. We know there are many people who have been living with lupus for 15, 19, 25, 30 and 40 years. This is not a disease that is universally fatal to all. The majority of people with lupus today can expect to live a normal lifespan.

      When people die of lupus, what do they usually die of?
      Overwhelming infection and kidney failure are the two most common causes of death in people with lupus. Recently there is new information which indicates heart disease may be another leading cause of death among people with lupus.

      Lupus Support Groups

      Make sure you call to confirm day and time. If you have a support group, please e-mail me, and I will add your group to the list.

      California

      Alameda — Lupus Foundation of Northern California — Alameda Sub-Chapter Support Group, 7-8:30 p.m., first Wednesdays monthly. Alameda Hospital, Room C. Nanette, 510-521-3699; Louise, 510-522-5727.

      Westlake Village — Conejo Valley Lupus Support Group, 6p.m. the first Tuesday of every month at 1 Baxter Way, Westlake Village. (805)524-3123.

      Florida

      Pensacola — Lupus Support Network is having its monthly Lupus/Fibromyalgia support group meeting on Saturday, Aug. 19, at Like Adult Home daycare in Pensacola at 2 p.m. The meetings are open to the general public and there is no charge for attending the meeting. For more information call Anna at 1-800-458-8211.

      Port St. Lucie — Lupus Support Group, 6:30-8 p.m. second Tuesday, boardroom, HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital, 1600 37th Ave., Vero Beach; (561) 279-8606.

      Georgia

      AUGUSTA — SKIP TO MY LUPUS: 6:30-8:30 p.m. Aug. 11, Sept. 8, Oct. 13, Nov. 10 and Dec. 8; Doctors Hospital, Medical Office Building I, Suite 309, Classroom 1; a support group for those who suffer with lupus and similar autoimmune disorders; (706) 496-2558 or Skip to My Lupus.

      Illinois

      BELLEVILLE — The Belleville Area Lupus Support Group will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, September 18th in the auditorium at Memorial Hospital, 4500 Memorial Drive, Belleville. The program will be “A Beginner’s Guide to Disability Planning” by Gregory Oliphant, including current disability law and ways to plan. For information, call 397-6008.
      GALESBURG – Lup

  20. mamacita

    I have a friend who has Lupus, Is their any cure for such disease and what cause it?
    my friend has only learnt about the disease until recent, and we cannot find any help here in my country (Belize) for her.
    She has been swollen from head to toe especially after the birth of her baby.

    1. hello

      First have they checked her for APS? She needs to see a rheumatologist or even a perinatologist as soon as possible. I am worried about her kidneys and clotting. Up to six week post partum Lupus and APS patients are more likely to clot and have problems.

      Although a lupus pregnancy is considered high risk, most women with lupus carry their babies safely to the end of their pregnancy. Women with lupus have a higher rate of miscarriage and premature births compared with the general population. In addition, women who have antiphospholipid antibodies are at a greater risk of miscarriage in the second trimester because of their increased risk of blood clotting in the placenta. Lupus patients with a history of kidney disease have a higher risk of preeclampsia (hypertension with a buildup of excess watery fluid in cells or tissues of the body). Pregnancy counseling and planning before pregnancy are important. Ideally, a woman should have no signs or symptoms of lupus and be taking no medications for at least 6 months before she becomes pregnant.

      Pregnancy counseling and planning before pregnancy are important.

      Some women may experience a mild to moderate flare during or after their pregnancy; others do not. Pregnant women with lupus, especially those taking corticosteroids, also are more likely to develop high blood pressure, diabetes, hyperglycemia (high blood sugar), and kidney complications, so regular care and good nutrition during pregnancy are essential. It is also advisable to have access to a neonatal (newborn) intensive care unit at the time of delivery in case the baby requires special medical attention.

  21. Toe the line

    I have 3 friends that have this disorder and never have heard or found what you write of. If it was out there – I think that I would have run over it by now….

    But on the chance that someone actually knows something about this and it really is able to be verified – I am going to star and watch your question as it does indeed have much importance to people that I care about.

    Nothing but well wishes and peace sent your way.

  22. Stormy Mariah

    Is there a cure for Lupus?
    If not, then is there a way to make it go into remission and stay that way? I know people with Diabeties who live normal live because they take really good care of themselves. As a friend how would I be able to help someone who had this disease? She has the kind that involves the organs.

    1. teambargain

      I have a friend who also has Lupus. It would be better for you to go to this link below to read and maybe find out more specific things you are looking for.

  23. Evil Ejade

    If you could come up with a CURE, which disease or condition would you pick to cure and why?
    I would choose Lupus because I have it and have met a few others here on yahoo that have it.
    Turtle..I also have Fibromyalgia along with Lupus. It really drains you doesn’t it?

    1. Anonymous

      I would say lung disease , I have it and so many get it that it’s one of the top killers we suffer from . I have a longtime friend who also has lupus .

  24. ~BooK_woRm~

    Lupus disease in American Pitbull, what should i do?
    I just get this diagnose about my dog, saying that his SLE blood test is positive. And i don’t know anything about it?? I just feel that it’s a wrong diagnose (i hope) is there any chance my dog get cure or a wrong diagnose? He has like itchy in his skin. I mean at the first, my dog diagnosed he has a food alergy, and later some bacteria from rain, and now lupus?????
    my dog doesn’t have joint problem. He still like to run. But the problem just in his skin, at the first doc say that he got allergy from pedigree food (i just change his diet) and then give me some prescription. But my dog stilln’t cured! so i check again, and doc say that he allergy to enviroment. And still not cured. Now, doc said that it has to do something with lupus. Is it true??

    1. john n

      lupus is a form of arthritis so if he has this he will have sore joints at times.u can give him asperin when he has a hard time moving around.try massaging his joints with little circle motions and apply warm hot towels if he is showing signs of pain.my husky has seasonal allergies where his skin is scalely and raw along with itchyness it drives him crazy at times, so i give him prednisone and benadryl when it is really bad. the rain and wet weather grass and weeds cause him a lot of problems.his hardest times is in the warm seasons so i rub him down with medicated oatmeal skin conditioner and give him the drugs. he will be 8 this year and he has been failing a little more this winter, so we will see how things go this summer. u could get another test done or wait and see how ur dog progresses. keep him dry from the weather and try not to let him get over weight so his body will not have extra fat to affect his joints. check web site that cater to dogs with natural remedies and hopefully there will be a lot of great things u can try. good luck p.s. i was thought to have lupus in the 1996 and it was rhumatiod arthris that finally showed up, i’m still here.

  25. johnwayneis

    Does anyone know if there’s a good cure for lyme disease? I?
    Not to confuse you. It’s not the rocky mountain spotted fever.
    My mother has lyme disease. So I was just wondering if there was any good cures. She’s had lyme disease for about 2 years now and she is still not better. But when she got it. I think she also got several infections with it. I think she has lupus with it. Could someone please help.

    1. keshequa87

      I thought, but could be mistaken, that Lyme disease was treated with a long powerful course of antibiotics. Did your mother go through this process? (That should have eliminated any infections she had with it.) And Lupus is something else altogether. It’s a disease of the auto-immune system. There are tests to definitively diagnose it. I’m not certain what you’re asking in your question but your mother should be under a doctor’s care. Let her know you’re concerned about her. Best of luck.

  26. johnwayneis

    Does anyone know if there’s a good cure for lyme disease?
    Not to confuse you. It’s not the rocky mountain spotted fever.
    My mother has lyme disease. So I was just wondering if there was any good cures. She’s had lyme disease for about 2 years now and she is still not better. But when she got it. I think she also got several infections with it. I think she has lupus with it. Could someone please help.
    My mom has seen specialist. She’s been on rocephin but they took her off of it. She has it so bad. That she even had to do treatments of IV recephin. The specialist that she goes too is a lyme disease specialist. The name is dr. Charles Chris. He’s a very good dr I heard too. Mainly I guess what I’m wanting to know is if they have a cure for lupus. If they can get rid of her lupus, then that might help her out with the memory loss and her brain infections. See sometimes she complains of her head burning. Which I guess is a symtom of lupus. Also all of the sudden her legs are going out on her. So I just really don’t know what to do. Well sorry I know these details are long. But I just wish there was something I could do.

    1. Amy B®

      Go to an infectious disease specialist. The lupus symptoms could be part of the Lyme disease, which must be taken care of with antibiotics.

  27. Print the nin died for Limeninja

    Forget about missing limbs, how come god never cures retardation?
    I mean, these are people who probably get more prayers as fetuses, infants and children than all the amputees in the world put together.

    Yet he never seems to remap the genes of Down’s Syndrome victims, or repair the damage from fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Nor dose he seem to have been interested in curing any cases of Cystic Fibrosis, Lupus, Haemophilia,Tay-Sachs disease, or Sickle Cell Anemia. I guess the prayers of all these victims and their families specifically fall on deaf ears.

    An how about midgets? I guess he just wants all of them to be short no matter how many of them pray for a little height.

    Yet he does seem to cure an awful lot of migranes, backaches, mysterious forms of paralysis, and excessive perspiration problems.
    J7
    Newspaper articles are hardly proof, and besides, the kid had an I.Q. of 92… which is hardly retarded. It’s a little bit below average. Let’s see what John Hopkins thinks of this kid.

    And there has NEVER been a confirmed case of an amputated limb growing back. If you know of one, post your source.

    1. Chinese Swede - let God be God

      God does not cure retardation, for a couple of reasons:

      1. I know that some of the most important things of life are actually more plainly seen and grasped by the mentally retarded than the most erudite scholar…. God uses the foolish things of the world to shame the wise, the weak things of the world to shame the strong (1 Corinthians 1.27)….
      2. To those parts of the body (humanity) that are embarrassing and without honor, God gives special honor (1 Corinthians 12, verse 22 especially).

      EDIT: Wow, 4 thumbs down and a “shut the *bleep* up”….

      Hey Foxy, have you been to a L’Arche community, like I have, worked with men and women with broken bodies and a locked up minds, yet – inspite of all that darkness and death and bitterness – still seen God move in the hearts of people?

      I also have cousins and siblings/children of friends with all manner of problems like those in PN’s question. Also, I was an “adjunct assistant” (helped friends who were assistants) in university to friends with cystic fibrosis and MS.

      And, while some have expressed the bitterness that you have demonstrated by your typed words, (often towards “an unfair God/god”), for some reason that I cannot fully comprehend, all in my circle have been moved at the core of their being to thankfulness, healing and wholeness IN SPITE of the externalities of their situation.

      While not “effective” and “efficient” and “productive”, and therefore, “valuable” as our capitalist society sees “value”, these men and women – my friends on a whole other level – have shown me that they have value in and of themselves. They have even pointed me towards the One that gives them that value….

      I have had the most real signs of deep affection from my friends with Downs…. Deep affection that shows how hollow and conditional in my affection I am; this has been hard for me to face myself, but Someone has been gracious.

      ****
      I would strongly recommend checking out the site below in my sources, as well as any of Henri Nouwen’s later writings. Henri spent the last many years of his life in one of the L’Arche communities in the Great Toronto Area, called L’Arche Daybreak, north of Metropolitan Toronto. He was an attendant and friend – in all that those terms mean – for Bill, when before that he was a well-respected Roman Catholic Priest and a Harvard scholar.

  28. lvhumphries

    how do you lose weight after gaining 60lbs from taking steroids due to having Lupus?
    after being told I had Lupus(an autoimmune disease with no cure but alot of pain and heartache) I had a bigger let down that I had to take steroids because the leading medicine given to LUPUS patients I couldn’t take because of another health issue—so i gained 60lbs in 6 months–HELP!!

    1. Beautiful B

      Im in the same boat as u i 2 have lupus and gain 25lbs do 2 the roids, since i’m off them 4 now i started working out 7x a wk 30mins a day 2x a day i eat 4-6 small meals and i try to burn 7000 cals a week so for i have lost 10lbs n 6wks but each person body is different but try to burn half of what u eat, put ur mind 2 it that i want the weight off i know it hurts 2 look @ urself a 6 60lbs more but just workout and diet diet good luck and best of health.
      p.s
      the pain will make u want 2 stop working out but dnt! i’ll b here with u every step of the way if u want more help email me!

  29. Clois K

    My mom have Lupus she Just find out that she have a kidney disease.But all i ask is a pray for my mom?
    My mom have Lupus she Just find out that she have a kidney disease and her Lupus rate is getting high and it’s stressing her out. I know it’s millions of people that ask for a cure . But all i ask is a pray for her. My mom have a good heart and she all i have ,no one else. So please pray for her. My mom name is Tanya Parrish. I no i should not gave out names but when it comes to your mom that you love and care about and She a hero to you. You think of least anything to make the pain stop for her But my name is Clois Knight and I thank everyone for reading this. Thanks‘!

    1. BeneficentJon

      Clois there aren’t many kids who would be as brave and calm as you if there mom was to get very sick. It proves that you are a good child and that your mom is doing a good job here. You have a good and believing heart. And God sees that too. So believe and don’t get discouraged no matter what God’s outcome is here. Just pray and God will do what is best here. Now is the time for you to be a good child to your mom. All you have to do is help her out in any way that you can. Do chores or just be with her. Tell her you love her very much. Just remember that not only am I praying for your mom, many, many others are. God listens to that. Also know that in this time of trial for your mom and yourself that he will be there for you two. He will help you get through this. He is a hero to everyone and in His eyes you are a hero here also. And when you need a friend– he is the friend that has always been there for you. He has always and will always love and care for you and your mom. You two are in good hands.

      Dear Lord I ask that you grant your healing touch to Tanya. Comfort and protect them both. Lift the worries away from her Jesus. Make them both whole in belief and united in you as they are a good family. I humbly ask this in your name Jesus. Amen.

      † Equitable Prayer Warrior †

  30. manuel j

    Any Body Have Or Heard Of Lupus Diseases?
    I have an uncle that suffers this diseases and I was wondering if anybody had gotten cured of known somebody that HAD suffered from this diseases or if anybody knows how to control it. Thank You

  31. mheretic666

    Question about Lupus?!?
    My girlfriends mom has a disease called lupus. Her mom is extremely skinny, cant barely eat, is always in pain etc. My friend says her mom’s lupus is very severe. Her mom also is very poor, and they live in a trailer and cant afford “decent” medication at all for the lupus.

    My question is what is the likely hood of my friend having it, she says almost all the females on her moms side have/had it, like 80% of them probably. Also if she does get it,if she can afford really good medication, could she keep the lupus under control at all even if its severe? When i say under control i mean her not getting skinny, in extreme pain etc. How long would she probably live with sever lupus, if she had the best medications, exercise, stayed out of the sun etc.

    In 10 years will their will be a cure, or atleast full-proof medication for this disease?

    1. george g

      Cured? no. Managed? yes, with difficulty. Lupus is an auto-immune disease, which means that the body’s immune system mistakenly recognizes ‘self’ as ‘foreign’, and attacks it by forming anti-bodies against certain proteins found in your body. The treatments revolve around dampening the immune system response which does treat the symptoms of lupus, but leaves the patient vulnerable to infections because of their suppressed immune system. Treatment options include glucorticoid steroids (not the kind that weightlifters use), cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, hydroxychloroquine, and others, all of which have severe side effects.

    1. Bubba

      This excerpt from the Lupus Foundation website might be helpful, or you can visit the link…

      The most common symptoms of lupus, which are the same for females and males, are:
      extreme fatigue (tiredness)
      headaches
      painful or swollen joints
      fever
      anemia (low numbers of red blood cells or hemoglobin, or low total blood volume)
      swelling (edema) in feet, legs, hands, and/or around eyes
      pain in chest on deep breathing (pleurisy)
      butterfly-shaped rash across cheeks and nose
      sun- or light-sensitivity (photosensitivity)
      hair loss
      abnormal blood clotting
      fingers turning white and/or blue when cold (Raynaud’s phenomenon)
      mouth or nose ulcers

  32. Anonymous

    Kidney Disease Campaign?
    Hi, I’m doing some work for a non-profit organization benefiting those living with kidney diseases and I was asked to come up with a campaign leading up to one of our big events. The campaign is to be through facebook and I’ve thought of a couple of options:

    1. We ask facebook fans to write something on their arm in support of kidney disease survivors (options for the words to be written: hope, faith, stand up)

    take a picture of the temporary tattoo and post it as their profile picture

    2. An art competition to come up with either a new logo or symbol for kidney disease. Lupus, for example, has the symbol of a purple butterfly representing a hope for a cure from the disease. Kidney diseases, as far as I am aware, do not have a similar symbol.

    I was just wondering what you thought of these ideas:

    Would you participate?
    What other words do you think could be used?
    How would you show your support for the cause?
    Any other ideas for campaigns?
    Oxford’s minority, I realize this. We already have a facebook group with thousands of members and we have been receiving emails and messages asking of ways that they can easily volunteer and show support without donating money (we don’t like to encourage not donating but raising awareness is one of our main goals).

    That is why we are creating a little contest/campaign to add to our already large facebook group in order to promote awareness as well as lead up to one of our events.

  33. Lady

    Could I have mild lupus?
    I’m fifteen years old. I’m an insomniac half the time, and the other half, I fall asleep immediately and am unable to wake up for at least ten hours. Even after that, I’m absolutely exhausted. I have trouble focusing; I often forget where my train of thought is heading. I get headaches all the time, which are only cured by two Advils, and sometimes not even that works.
    My friends often comment on how fragile I am. My best friend is afraid to even hug me sometimes (especially when I’m sitting down) because she once tackle-hugged me while I was sitting indian-style and my hip was suddenly on fire. I also am getting a C in gym because I had to skip some of the yoga poses we were doing. They irritated my right hip (which is sometimes overcome with unexplained pain.) I can’t be poked or even really touched in the ribs because they’ll bruise so easily.
    I am easily knocked off-balance by the slightest touches. My limbs always feel so weak and fragile, and they ache something terrible. I can hardly go up/down stairs without using the railing to steady/support myself. I used to pass it off as growing pains, but I haven’t grown in a couple of years. I’m 15, and 5’5, and I’m pretty sure I’m not growing anymore.
    Sometimes, after I eat — especially after eating lunch at school, for some reason — I experience extreme abdominal pain. It’s just this resounding ache in my stomach. It has no reason to be there, but it IS.
    Also, often I experience severe chest pain upon breathing in.
    I always thought this was normal. I don’t know if I’ve always been this way, or if it started some time ago. But if, once upon a time, I actually had ENERGY, I can’t remember it.
    Now, mind you, this is all even with the fact that my school consists of seven different academic buildings which I walk back-and-forth between all day. And gym class. And my 20 to 30 minute uphill walk home. So I’m not out of shape. I’m perfectly in shape. I get plenty of hearty excercise every day. So why am I so weak? Why do my shoulders creak whenever I move them?
    Anyway, I never really thought much of it until, one day, my cat’s whisker tickled me in the lower-thigh area, and I reached down to brush/scratch the area, only to gasp in pain. I had actually hurt myself by scratching. I hadn’t even done it hard, but I had to hold my breath for a couple of seconds and could hardly move for at least half a minute. This kind of thing had happened before — where I accidently hurt myself doing something completely normal — but never so extreme.
    I forgot about the incident. One day, I was reading a book, and in it one of the characters was talking about their illness. They had lupus. They experienced extreme fatigue, muscle/joint pain, an inability to focus, physical weakness despite excercise…etc.
    I had a bit of an epiphany. Maybe, just maybe, everything I was experiencing WASN’T normal. After all, I’m a 15-year-old girl who excercises daily (if not by choice), follows a rather healthy vegetarian lifestyle, drinks gallons upon gallons of tea by month…why am I not brimming with energy?
    So, I researched it. I researched it so well that, just the other day, my little sister was watching Mystery Diagnosis and the doctors just didn’t know what this lady had. And I shouted out, “It’s lupus, you idiots!” Five minutes later, they revealed that it was lupus. I know this disease like the back of my hand, and I don’t know if I have it, but I don’t know if I DON’T have it.
    All I know is that, I suffer from quite a bit of the symptoms:

    -My skin (especially on my fingers and legs) turned purple in the cold. My friends and I used to joke about it, actually. Whenever I went out in the cold, I would exclaim mournfully, “I’m turning purple!”
    -I suffer from terrible headaches.
    -I’m always exhausted.
    -My limbs hurt for no reason.
    -My joints are extremely weak; they’re always creaking.
    -I can’t sit in one position for too long because I get so stiff and sore. As a result, sleeping is very difficult, because I (for some reason) don’t move at all while I sleep, so I have to wake up to move into a new position.
    -I have issues focusing on things that require logical thought. For this reason, I cannot easily understand very wordy things. I often loose my train of thought.
    -My eyes sometimes sting for no reason, or become very watery and noticeably red. Granted, this didn’t start until after I started wearing contacts. But I haven’t worn my contacts in a little under two months and it still happens.

    There’s more, but honestly, there’s just too many to name. I basically just hurt all over, and for no reason, and I’m tired, and I’m looking for answers.

    So, to lupus sufferers, to people who know lupus sufferers, to doctors, to anyone who has any knowledge about this — do you think I could have lupus?
    Also, symptoms I’ve just remembered that I considered important:

    -I very often wake up in the middle of the night due to severe leg pain — usually in my left leg, but in my right it is not unheard of — that literally keeps me from moving for at least a minute, at most five.

    -My right wrist cracks. I mean, it REALLY cracks. It’s like pi. If I could keep cracking it without my arm getting tired, it would never stop. I don’t know if this is a form of arthritis (as it doesn’t really hurt, it just gets kind of sore sometimes), but I’ve always used it to freak people out and thought it was cool. Until I saw that arthritis-like symptoms, especially in the hands and feet, are a symptom of lupus.

    -A year or two ago (I don’t really remember), I was sick and my mother took me to the doctor, who speculated — upon learning of my exhaustion and such — that I was probably anemic. We never heard from her, so I assume I’m not. But I know lupus is often mistaken for anemia.

  34. popstarbria

    Does any one else have Crohn’s Disease?
    I’m 13 years old and I have Crohn’s Disease along with R.S.D. and also Juvenile Arthritis. I could possibly have lupus. I’ve finally figured out how to control most of the Crohn’s Disease flare-ups with natural remedies but my other problems are full fledged still! RSD, Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, will literally make my legs turn blue, cause me to lose any feeling in my legs and arms and I cannot use my legs sometimes when the flare-ups are really bad! Juvenile Arthritis is something else I could possibly have. No doctor has confirmed it, yet and I’ve had to travel out of town to see rheumotoligists before because the ones in my town didn’t know what to do with my conditions!!!

    When I was 6, I was diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease. Now keep in mind that this was after coming to the hospital about twice a week for about 4 years because my Crohn’s flare-ups were so bad! My mom is a redhead, I like to call her hothead!, and thankfully she won’t take no for an answer!! She was extremely persistent in trying to find the cause in my horrible stomach pain even though almost every time we went to the doctor, they would tell her I was just fine! This was all before I was diagnosed. Eventually, she found a doctor that somewhat understood what we were going through (mainly her at the time, because I was very young) and tried all the possible treatments that could help ease the disease. Even today, there is no cure for Crohn’s Disease!! At 6, the doctor that helped us diagnosed me with Crohn’s Disease and put me through a series of medications including some that children aren’t allowed to take. I took Methotrexate for a long period of time and cannot think of the other medications right now. I now have to wear glasses because of the medicines I took and my family and I are pretty sure that the medications I took caused my other conditions. We’re pretty much certain that the medicines cause my RSD.

    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy (RSD) is an illness that causes the lower and upper extremities to turn a bluish color and causes the extremities to become numb. When I first had a flare-up, it was when I was 11 and my parents thought it was a blood clot. So did the doctors. We went through a series of tests that day because I had to go to the hospital. I was admitted for a week and during that time, I had to get an epidural!!! Yes, that thing pregnant women get! I had to get it because my legs were hurting so bad they had to numb them! We’re still not sure if what I have is RSD, but it’s all we got for now!

    I know this is long and sorry but I only gave you two of my illnesses! lol If any one else has any thing I have, please give me tips on how to control it! Anything will help!!Thank you!!!

    1. Loz

      Hi there. I don’t have Crohne’s Disease, but I’m 25 and I’ve had Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (the correct name for RSD) since I was 14. It started in my right knee following a minor operation, but it now affects almost my whole body and ahs put me in a wheelchair because of some of its secondary effects that no amount of physio or medication has been able to counteract. I’ve never heard of medications causing CRPS/RSD – it’s almost always initiated by some sort of injury or other trauma.

      I wish that I could tell you how to control it – I’ve been through pretty much every recognised treatment with no real success. I guess that my only advice for what it’s worth is to take each day as it comes and to recognise that you are going to have bad days. Don’t give up by any means, but know your limits and boundaries, and know when it is time to say ‘okay’ I’ve had enough and when it is okay to push yourself that little bit harder.

      If I can help in any way, please feel free to email me.

  35. David Webb

    Has anyone had to deal with a close one having Lupus?
    Has anyone had to deal with a close one having Lupus?
    My mother was diagnosed with Lupus when she was just 23,
    at the time and right up to her death in 1991 (in a car accident) there was no cure,
    she had suffered from heart problems, renal failure, amongst other issues, can anyone give me any information about their experiences, with this disease or people who have had it.

    In ireland, there is very little info available. And now that I’m older I’m finding myself more curious about this not much spoken about disease.

  36. cortlin.harrison

    is this a good research project please be honest?
    Cortlin Harrison Science 10-12
    Mrs. Cooney/ Mrs. Barends ELA 21-23
    May 19, 2009
    Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome is a disorder in which the body recognizes certain normal components of blood and/or cell membranes as foreign substances and produces antibodies against them. This disorder is non-infectious which means that this disorder can’t be passed from person to person by contact. Pregnant women are more prone to get this disorder than anyone else, and African Americans, and Hispanics but like other disorders anyone can get Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    The symptoms and characteristics of this disorder are not hard to spot. Some symptoms of the disorder are veins or arteries of the arms or legs may cause pain, numbness, tingling in the feet. Arteries of the heart may cause chest pain or heart attack, the individual with this disorder may have heart murmur. In pregnant women with Antiphospholipid Syndrome, miscarriage can occur prior to 20 week of gestation, while pre-eclampsia is reported to occur after that time. Blood vessels of the skin – may cause painful bruises (purpura) or a condition called livedo reticularis. Blood vessels of the brain – if a clot cuts off blood supply to a part of the brain, this causes a stroke. An individual with APS may also experience migraine headaches or seizures.

    There is no cure and there is no way to avoid getting this disorder. There are many treatments for this disorder. But the most successful treatment is anticoagulant therapy. This is usually successful in preventing further blood clots. This disorder can severely damage the body in many different ways because good cells attack other good cells and that causes chaos through the body. And when a weak or strong pathogen enters the body it can be deadly.

    Some other information about Antiphospholipid Syndrome is, 1-5% of the world population is known to have this disorder, and 40-50% of patients with lupus also have APS. One third of strokes occurring in younger people (under the age of 50) are due to Antiphospholipid Syndrome. One third of patients with Antiphospholipid Syndrome are said to have lupus, and or Raynaud disease. APS is more common in young to middle-aged adults; however, it also manifests in children and elderly people. Disease onset has been reported in children as young as 8 months.

    This disorder is very rare and not very deadly but this disorder can still affect your way of life, the way you think, and can make you dizzy and other things. My mom has this disorder and sometimes it’s hard to get around and such, but you can still fight back by eating a healthy diet and seeing a special doctor called a Rheumatologist, this doctor specializes in these types of rare disorders.

  37. sassybae

    information on a serious disease called ‘Lupus’?
    I took my dog to the emergency clinic last night because he had a horrible looking rash on his nose and it was oozing and apeared to be bleeding, his whole body was hot and sweaty and he seemed very weak, he wouldint open his eyes or even move, i could tell he was very ill, but once i got there they told me he may have a disease called Lupus, they are currently doing tests to verify, but they didint tell me much, i’m wondering if anyone knows anything, is it possibly fatal? can it be cured? money is no factor I just want him to get better.

  38. Jewels

    Lupus has severely affected my life as well and as a nurse i am upset to know that its not as well known as other helath problems, I have found that Lupus Research Institute donations are one hundred percent to research for a cure because their board pays their salaries so no donation money is used for administration costs. I found this uplifiting, also lupus foundation of america is great to help anyone who is interested in raising money for lupus research get started. My sister contacted them and they sent her a box of educationakl material, bracelets to give out or sale, ideas for fundraisers envelopes to mail donations in etc. they also answered all her questions about lupus and fundraising in a very kind and fast manner. You can sign up on their website to be informed of all bills going to washington that would help fund lupus research so that you can contact your representative and congressmen to vote for it.

  39. padiwan2

    Is there anyone here who’s got tuberous sclerosis and born in the 60’s? How do you cope?
    I’ve had this disease since I was 13 months old and no info came through for me till I was 26 and I lost my left kidney. It may be the mildest form in me but it’s still been a complete heartless bully to me. Then again, I think of my friend who’s battling lupus SLE and I think to myself I am lucky. I pray for her to get cured first and THEN tend to me but still there’s got to be things I can do hopefully without meds that can help me. I’m open to all suggestions. I bring up born in the 60’s cause I was born then and all they had was a name for the condition. I’m looking for updates for a condition that to me doesn’t exist. Help.

    1. madderthanthehatter

      I’m really sorry to hear that, but you know the answer already and it would be cruel to give you false hope. They are doing reseach all the time and you never know. But that’s what everyone has told you already. You are right, it’s complete heartless bully. But you are standing up to the bully and haven’t given into it, you have battled it every step of the way.

      You said you have a mild form of the disease. But from your post I don’t think you are giving yourself enough credit. You have fought the disease and refused to give in. I think you are the answer. You are the reason that has slowed it down and even made it back up.

      You have things you can still do and and you enjoy life as much as possible.

      People don’t know how rare your courage is, you are a rare and beautiful person and even one of the meanest bullies of diseases couldn’t take that away from you. God Bless

  40. Spreading Luv

    how do i start a charity walk in my town for lupus? what are the steps and who do i contact?
    My Grandmother passed away from lupus in 1995 and ever since then i wanted to do something to give people with lupus hope and inspiration to help maybe one day cure this disease not much is known about it but hopefully with help i could raise awareness!!!!
    Please help!!!?

    1. Andrea J

      Contact the Lupus Foundation. They should be able to give you pointers and advice on how to arrange for the walk. I commend you for your efforts. I had a friend who passed away from Lupus.
      God Bless

  41. ugly ego...

    What is the title of this movie?
    Its about a university student and his teacher. He is very intelligent. His teacher assigns the class to do research on a disease which i think is lupus them not knowing that she has it. At the end I think that he finds the cure or finds out that the teacher has lupus. I also think that the teacher dies I am not sure. Also the movie is old. Sorry I don’t know any other description of the movie…. PLEASE HELP ME!! I really want to know what the movie title is. THANKS!! 🙂

  42. Kate-Ann

    Why isn’t the government working harder to find cures for these incurable diseases/disorders?
    Do you guys think that not enough work is being done to find cures for the incurable diseases/disorders out here?I feel like not enough work is being done.Theres still no cure for a lot of these diseases/disorders. I work as a nurse aide in a nursing home.I became a nurse aide back in 2006 because I thought I wanted to be a nurse.I changed my major once I started working as nurse aide.My backup plan was to become a teacher.I quickly changed my major to early childhood education once I became nurse aide because I can’t take the suffering of the patients.I love all 248 residents and it hurts that some are suffering from incurable diseases.This one has Alzheimers.This one has multiple sclerosis.It goes on and on.Why is there no cure for AIDS/HIV?Why is there no cure for Alzheimers?Multiple Sclerosis?Schizophrenia?Manic Depression?Cancer?Diabeters?Lupus?Is the government not working on finding cures so pharmaceutical companies can continue making profit from medications sold?
    It hurts that I have seen some of my residents at the nursing home get worse.Theres no cure for Alzheimers.Sufferes continue to forget and some even get to a point where they can’t even talk.I know one lady with MS who has no use of her arms or legs.She has to be fed,turned,etc.She’s totally bedridden.It hurts.I have seen people with MS get worse and die so young.The same with Alzheimers.And with cancer if it’s not caught on time, person dies.It hurts that I witness diabetics loose their limbs or a toe or finger.And sometimes I feel that not enough work is being done to cure AIDS/HIV because it mostly afflicts minorities.Why isn’t enough work being done to find cures for these incurable diseases/disorders? I am only doing the nurse aide thing until I earn my BA in education.It just hurts that I have to watch some of my residents get worse because there’s no cure for these things..Same for some relatives/friends.Will there ever be cures for these incurable diseases/disorders?
    I asked a question about cures for disease.
    Keep your ignorant judgemental comments to yourself LexDiamo.You don’t know me and I don’t know you and don’t want to.Your comment was totally irrelevant and so immature.You need to get it together and grow up. ANd I’m not ignorant, I’m real.I keep it real.You don’t like it, tough.If you hate it that much then don’t read my questions.Screw you and what you think about me!And you the one with issues fronting like you all that when in actuality you’re not.Bite me!

  43. Dance-a-Holic

    I need help editing my research paper. I’m really bad at papers…..please help!?
    Well, its on lupus. I have the intro and two body paragraphs, and I still need to do the conclusion. So, I was wondering what I should change on my paper, and what I need to add..? I also have to do a powerpoint based on the paper, that should last a minimum of 5 minutes up to 15.

    The reason why I chose this topic was because my dad has lupus, and I wanted to know more about the topic. He was diagnosed with lupus when he was about fourteen years old. He still receives treatment for it by going in for blood tests and taking medication He has the most common form of lupus, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), in which causes the antibodies to react against his own normal tissue. He has arthritis and joint problems, but nothings wrong with his internal organs. To support my dad and other lupus survivors, my family and I all go to the lupus walk in honor of remembering the people who had lupus that died. The things the audience can expect to read in this paper are the different types of lupus, the symptoms, the treatment and cures.
    Lupus is the result of an unbalanced immune system that can be destructive to any organ in the body. It can be categorized into three groups: discoid lupus Erythematosus, systemic lupus Erythematosus, and drug-induced systemic lupus Erythematosus. DLE is always limited to the skin and is identified by a rash that may appear on the face, neck, and scalp. It can evolve into the systemic form, which can affect any organ or system of the body. Systemic lupus Erythematosus is more severe than discoid lupus and can affect almost any organ or organ system of the body. No two people with SLE will have identical symptoms. Drug-induced systemic Lupus Erythematosus occurs after the use of certain prescribed drugs. It is more common in men, because the drugs are given to them more often.
    Lupus is hard to diagnose because it has a wide range of symptoms involving various parts of the body; and symptoms differ from each person. Most people develop painful joints and a rash, but lupus may also cause fatigue, depressions, and kidney problems. The treatment of lupus varies from person to person because each person has different symptoms. Most people with SLE require a regular blood test to check for lupus flares. Medication is the primary medical treatment for lupus. Presently, there are no other methods available to treat lupus because there is nothing else that can have the necessary impact on the immune system. Currently, there is no cure for lupus, but with early diagnosis and proper medical treatment it can significantly help control the disease.

    thanks. it would be much appreciated!!!!

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