Stevens Johnsons Syndrome Diagnosis and Treatment

Author: Juliet Cohen

Stevens Johnsons Syndrome is a dangerous problem of the skin. It is thought to be a hypersensitivity complex affecting the skin and the mucous membranes.SJS is an immune-complex-mediated hypersensitivity disorder that may be caused by many drugs, viral infections, and malignancies. The skin rash of SJS consists of erythematous (red) papules, vesicles, bullae. There may also be iris lesions. The mucosal lesions include conjunctivitis as well as oral and genital ulcers. The most frequent complications of SJS are keratitis, uveitis, and perforation of the globe of the eye all of which may result in permanent visual impairment. SJS is a rare condition, with a reported incidence of around one case per million people per year.

SJS occurs with a worldwide distribution similar in etiology and occurrence to that in the United States. These skin diseases can cause massive pain, suffering and anxiety. People that have taken or are taking medications such as the ones mentioned above are urged to familiarise themselves with the symptoms of SJS (Stevens-Johnson Syndrome) and Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis. Viral infections, diseases that decrease your immunity, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), and systemic lupus erythematosus a chronic inflammatory disease increase your risk of developing Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Avoid medications that cause this skin disease. Complete care is very effective and in starting treatment of Stevens Johnsons Syndrome is just like burns.

Cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide can be used to reduce Stevens Johnsons Syndrome. Treatment with corticosteroids is controversial since it might aggravate the condition or increase risk of secondary infections. Other agents have been used, including cyclophosphamide and cyclosporine, but none have exhibited much therapeutic success. Use of antiseptics and anesthetics may help in treatment of SJS. In severe cases, immunoglobulin intravenous (IGIV) to halt the process of Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Osteo-odonto-keratoprosthesis is a revolutionary treatment which involves the usage of the patients own mucosal cells from the buccal cavity as a culture over the eye and placing a cylinder crafted from the patients canine tooth{ also called as the eye toth } in the place of the pupil.

Article Source: http://www.articlesbase.com/diseases-and-conditions-articles/stevens-johnsons-syndrome-diagnosis-and-treatment-287170.html

About the Author

Juliet Cohen writes health articles for skin diseases and skin disorders. She also writes articles for health tips.


2 thoughts on “Lupus Erythematosus Rash Pictures

  1. Act4Love

    Should I get tested for Lupus?
    Hi, I’m 16 years old. I’ve been suffering from bumps and redness on my face (cheeks, mostly), and it’s been something which I cannot get rid of. I thought it was just acne. My mom, however, is currently studying to be a nurse, and in her textbook she stumbled upon a picture of the butterfly rash often associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (known as Lupus/SLE). I didn’t think much of it, until my mom and I researched the symptoms.
    These are the symptoms I’m currently experiencing:
    *Rash?
    *Extreme fatigue
    *Depression
    *Joint pain (mostly in my knees and ankles)
    *Migraine-like headaches almost every day for the past month
    *Difficulty concentrating
    *Psychosis
    *Inflamation of organs-last year I was diagnosed with gastreoenteritis.
    *Also, about a week and a half ago my back (around the kidney area) started hurting
    *I thought it was my period, but I have dried up blood that comes out everytime I wipe after urinating.
    *I have virtually no appetite.
    *My vision has been blurred the past few days.
    *The “flares” started about 2 weeks after the fatigue.

    What do you think about it?
    Thank you in advance.

    P.S- The symptoms listed started before I found out about the disease…less chance of psychosomatic diagnosis 🙂

    1. FirstStar

      Yes, you should probably get tested!

      Lupus is an Autoimmune disease, which is caused by both genetic and environmental factors, so, if you have a family history of auto immune diseases (Such as Crohns Disease, Scleroderma, Rheumatoid Arthritis ect…) You are at an increased risk, also if you are female and between 15 to 45.

      It takes awhile to diagnose Lupus, but your doctor will (most likely) refer you to an Internal Medicine Doctor, or may order the test themselves (Blood test! Urine test!) And depending on what the doctor thinks, the blood test will include an ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) test (Very important test!!! if this comes out positive, it could mean Lupus, or another auto-immune disorder!!!)

      Some other blood tests may also include tests for Hep. C, and Hep D, along with a Creatinine test, Bilrubin and Albumin test (Too much to type- Google it!) and ALT test (To see how epic your liver is doing!)

      So YES. Get tested; because like I said, it takes awhile to diagnose because the symptoms mimic so many other diseases; it could take months.

      Good Luck! 🙂

      I’m 17 and had Lupus symptoms too; test results come back in January (Next month!) Hope 4 the best!

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