Hair loss is a sensitive issue for men of any age, and can also have an influence on a man's self-esteem. Androgenic alopecia is the medical terminology for male pattern baldness, which is a condition in which a man starts losing his hairs in a particular pattern. You start experiencing thinning of hairs from the crown and temple of your head. As a result, over a period of time there is a formation of a horseshoe shape on the sides of the head and your crown remains bald. If you are experiencing shedding of hair during washing or brushing, with minimal regrowth, you may be suffering from male pattern hair loss.

Hair loss has been known to be connected to underlying health complications such as diabetes or lupus. Some experts also believe that it can be aggravated by stress, anxiety, poor diet, depression, intake of toxic substance, hormonal imbalance, ageing, nervous disorders, injury and impairment or hormonal imbalance. However, the main reason reported by millions for male pattern baldness is sensitivity of the hair follicles dihydrotestosterone (DHT) hormone. It is a by-product of the male hormone known as testosterone. The conversion of testosterone to DHT happens with the help of an enzyme called 5-alpha reductase. Every time the quantity of DHT increases in body, the hair follicles are affected. These hormones circulate with blood and result in shrinking of hair follicles. As you grow older, the growth of hairs stop completely and you develop a bald patch.

There are some surgical treatments like flap surgery, scalp reduction and a hair transplant, which can treat hair loss. However, these treatments are very expensive and can cause serious side effects. Men, suffering from male pattern baldness, are usually prescribed a clinically proven oral medication called Propecia. The primary active component of this medication is Finasteride which acts as a 5-alpha reductase inhibitor. It works towards preventing the conversion of testosterone to DHT, so that your hair follicles remain healthy. Propecia pills have been proven to be highly effective at preventing further hair loss and may also encourage hair regrowth in some men. You should take one tablet of Propecia every day and to get visible changes in just few months.

You should take this medication only after a proper consultation with a licensed doctor as you can experience some side effects while using this medication. The potential side effects may include pain in the testicular area, reduced sex drive, decrease in semen production, low libido and erectile dysfunction, although they are rare. These are also temporary effects and tend to go away once you discontinue taking the medication. You can buy this medication from any of the registered online pharmacies and opt for a free and confidential consultation with licensed doctor or medical professional. The consultation is vital as it makes sure the medication is safe and suitable for you. You would be asked to discontinue this treatment, if you are allergic to Finasteride or if you have any issues related to regular working of the liver such as hepatic failure.

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Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/hair-loss-articles/can-you-stop-hair-loss-propecia-905447.html


lupus hair loss regrowth

20 thoughts on “Lupus Hair Loss Regrowth

    1. Joe Armstrong

      Your hair goes through a cycle of growth and rest. The course of each cycle varies by individual. But in general, the growth phase of scalp hair, known as anagen, typically lasts two to three years. During this time, your hair grows about 1 centimeter (just less than 1/2 inch) a month. The resting phase is called telogen. This phase typically lasts three to four months. At the end of the resting phase, the hair strand falls out and a new one begins to grow in its place. Once a hair is shed, the growth stage begins again.

      Most people normally shed 50 to 100 hairs a day. But with about 100,000 hairs in the scalp, this amount of hair loss shouldn’t cause noticeable thinning of the scalp hair.

      Gradual thinning is a normal part of aging. However, hair loss may lead to baldness when the rate of shedding exceeds the rate of regrowth, when new hair is thinner than the hair shed or when hair comes out in patches.

      Causes of specific types of hair loss

      Pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). In male- and female-pattern baldness, the time of growth shortens, and the hairs are not as thick or sturdy. With each growth cycle, the hairs become rooted more superficially and more easily fall out. Heredity likely plays a key role. A history of androgenetic alopecia on either side of your family increases your risk of balding. Heredity also affects the age at which you begin to lose hair and the developmental speed, pattern and extent of your baldness.
      Cicatricial (scarring) alopecia. This type of permanent hair loss occurs when inflammation damages and scars the hair follicle. This prevents new hair from growing. This condition can be seen in several skin conditions, including lupus erythematosus or lichen planus. It’s not known what triggers or causes this inflammation.
      Alopecia areata. This is classified as an autoimmune disease, but the cause is unknown. People who develop alopecia areata are generally in good health. A few people may have other autoimmune disorders including thyroid disease. Some scientists believe that some people are genetically predisposed to develop alopecia areata and that a trigger, such as a virus or something else in the environment, sets off the condition. A family history of alopecia areata makes you more likely to develop it. With alopecia areata, your hair generally grows back, but you may lose and regrow your hair a number of times.
      Telogen effluvium. This type of hair loss is usually due to a change in your normal hair cycle. It may occur when some type of shock to your system — emotional or physical — causes hair roots to be pushed prematurely into the resting state. The affected growing hairs from these hair roots fall out. In a month or two, the hair follicles become active again and new hair starts to grow. Telogen effluvium may follow emotional distress, such as a death in the family, or after a physiological stress, such as a high fever, sudden or excessive weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, surgery, or metabolic disturbances. Hair typically grows back once the condition that caused it corrects itself, but it usually take months.
      Traction alopecia. Excessive hairstyling or hairstyles that pull your hair too tightly cause traction alopecia. If the pulling is stopped before there’s scarring of your scalp and permanent damage to the root, hair usually grows back normally.
      Other causes of hair loss

      Poor nutrition. Having inadequate protein or iron in your diet or poor nourishment in other ways can cause you to experience hair loss. Fad diets, crash diets and certain illnesses, such as eating disorders, can cause poor nutrition.
      Medications. Certain drugs used to treat gout, arthritis, depression, heart problems and high blood pressure may cause hair loss in some people. Taking birth control pills also may result in hair loss for some women.
      Disease. Diabetes and lupus can cause hair loss.
      Medical treatments. Undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy may cause you to develop alopecia. Under these conditions, healthy, growing (anagen) hairs can be affected. After your treatment ends, your hair typically begins to regrow.
      Hormonal changes. Hormonal changes and imbalances can cause temporary hair loss. This could be due to pregnancy, having a baby, discontinuing birth control pills, beginning menopause, or an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. The hair loss may be delayed by three months following a hormonal change, and it’ll take another three months for new hair to grow back. During pregnancy, it’s normal to have thicker, more luxuriant hair. It’s also common to lose more hair than normal about three months after delivery. If a hormonal imbalance is associated with an overproduction of testosterone, there may be a thinning of hair over the crown of the scalp. Correcting hormonal imbalances may stop hair loss.
      Hair treatments. Chemicals used for dying, tinting, bleaching, straightening or permanent waves can cause hair to become damaged and so on.
      Please check out my source to find more.

    1. Shelty K

      Well be careful there are a lot of scams out there!

      Alopecia areata (AA) causes hair loss in small, round patches that may go away on their own, or may last for many years. Nearly 2% of the U.S. population (about four million people) will develop AA in their lifetime. Some people with AA (about 5%) may lose all scalp hair (alopecia totalis) or all scalp and body hair (alopecia universalis). The immune system, for unknown reasons, attacks the hair root and causes hair loss.

      Who gets AA?
      AA occurs world-wide in both genders and in every ethnic group. Children and young adults are most frequently affected, but persons of all ages are susceptible. One in five persons with AA has a family member who also has the disease.

      What are the signs and symptoms of AA?
      AA usually begins with one or more small, round, coin-size, bare patches. It is most common on the scalp, but can involve any hair-bearing site including eyebrows, eyelashes, and beards. Hair may fall out and regrow with the possibility of full hair regrowth always present. AA usually has no associated symptoms, but there may be minor discomfort or itching prior to developing a new patch. Nails may have tiny pinpoint dents and may rarely become distorted.
      What causes AA?
      AA is not contagious. It is an autoimmune disease in which the body’s immune system attacks itself, in this case, the hair follicles. The cause is not known. A person’s particular genetic makeup combined with other factors triggers AA.

      What tests are done to confirm AA?
      Although your dermatologist may know by examining your scalp that you have AA, occasionally, a scalp biopsy is helpful in confirming the diagnosis.

      Is this a symptom of a serious disease?
      AA is not a symptom of a serious disease and usually occurs in otherwise healthy individuals. Persons with AA may have a higher risk of atopic eczema, asthma, and nasal allergies, as well as other autoimmune diseases such as thyroid disease (Hashimoto’s thyroiditis), and vitiligo. Family members may also have atopic eczema, asthma, nasal allergies, or autoimmune diseases (i.e. insulin-dependent diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, thyroid disease, or systemic lupus erythematosus).
      Will the hair grow back?
      Yes, it is likely that the hair may regrow, but it may fall out again. The course of the disease varies from person to person, and no one can predict when the hair might regrow or fall out again. This unpredictability of AA, and the lack of control over it, makes this condition frustrating. Some people lose a few patches of hair, the hair regrows, and the condition never returns. Other people continue to lose and regrow hair for many years. The potential for full regrowth is always there, even in people who lose all the hair on their scalp and body (alopecia totalis/universalis). Hair could regrow white or fine, but the original hair color and texture may return later.

  1. Babygirl

    what is the best solution for lupus sle patients whose hair either breaks or falls out?
    I am African-American was diagnosed several years ago with Lupus SLE. As a result, my hair is very dry and thin. My hair is long in most places and short in others (top and back). What is a good solution to my problem? Also, what is the best hair care regimen to follow/

  2. Kim V

    16 yr old female hair loss?
    I’ve always had long reallyy thick hair and not too long ago my hair has randomly has been thinning and now, it’s not even close to the thickness i had before and just feels gross..It’s really freaking me out..In the shower, literal handfuls of hair come out and i needd it to stop..my last hair cut was in november..(i only get them when i go see my dad..) My dad’s gf- who cuts my hair- says to not worry about it and the hair has a natural 7 year cycle or something..is this true? I really am worried..i’m only 16! whyy is this happening?
    uhh..i have been really tired lately but i just thought it was apart of that whole growing up thing..is lupis something that can just randomley pop up?

    1. xghettofreekshow6x

      O man people are jumping to some serious conclusions. To start, there is a 7 year cycle your hair goes through but shedding is never noticable. From the way you describe it, it doesn’t sound like there are any patches of baldness and that it is thin all over. If that’s the case, thats good. That’s what I have. It’s called Telogen Effluvium, in which your hair goes into a resting stage and massively sheds. You randomly start noticing this type of hair shed and there are many reasons for it: some things in the blood, starting or stopping birth control, having a baby, iron levels, lupus or diabetes, high emotional stress…there are so many things it could be. Mine started due to stopping the pill back in september. I noticed the loss in january and now, it stopped falling out so much though it does still fall out more than it did. I have a bit of regrowth but i’ll have to wait for it all. Here’s some things to remember:

      1. You WON’T lose all your hair. 50-70% in most cases. ((for the record, Britney lost some hair due to emotional stress…she shaved her hair cuz she’s crazy…))
      2. It will grow back.
      3. Stressing about it will only make it worse.
      4. Cut your hair short and layer it. This makes it look thicker. Look into using a new shampoo ((I use nioxin. It’s expensive but it makes your hair look WAY thicker but it doesnt actualy make it thicker or make it grow faster)), Worst shampoo for you is Pantene Pro-V. Another good, and cheaper aternative is Head and Shoulders.
      4. Go to a dermatologist ((they handle hair loss)) or at least a genral practitioner so they can diagnose you with something and help you

      Most importantly, remember you’e not alone. I’m 21 years old and once had thick beautiful hair. Stay positive!

  3. maria m

    Female 19 years old having hair loss!!?
    I know its normal to lose some hair but im pretty sure im losing way more then i should be at this age. Just touching my hair i lose strands and things like washing it brushing it and even while i sleep i lose some. Even my bf noticed the last time i was at his house we were laying on his bad watching a movie and once i left he called me n said i found like a million of you hairs every where. Why could this be happening?

    1. Professor Dad

      Hair Loss Products: Free Trial Offer

      Yes, some hair loss is normal, about 100 strands per day. Before you experiment with hair loss products, insure there are no environmental issues present in your individual case, which could cause hair loss. No hair loss treatments will help until those issues are resolved. Male and female hair loss may be the result of any one of many different factors.

      In both men and women, hair loss can be divided into two categories. Hereditary factors, for which there is no proven cure, and environmental factors, for which an abundance of research has provided many solutions. Of the many makers of hair loss products, few are willing to stand behind their products with a guarantee of their effectiveness. The manufacturers of Provillus are so sure that it will stop your hair loss and assist in the regrowth of your hair, due to environmental causes, that they are willing to guarantee satisfaction with a 60 day Free Trial Offer. Because your hair loss may be due to heredity, this product comes with a 180 day money back guarantee, just in case it does not work for you.

      Causes of Hair Loss

      Unfortunately, science is unable to overcome the effects of genetic differences provided by our parents. Individuals with this type of baldness or hair loss will not respond to traditional methods of treatment. So, I will concentrate on the environmental causes.

      Among these environmental causes there are abuse, disease, and completely normal conditions associated with aging. Many of these are controllable, and when the condition or abuse is resolved, the hair loss will stop.

      Abuse:

      Abuse takes several different forms, the obvious, like self abuse where the subject pulls out their own hair. And more subtle abuses.

      1.An unbalanced diet without enough protein can cause temporary hair loss.
      Solution: Pay more attention to nutritional needs.
      2.Couch Potatoes and an otherwise sedentary lifestyle, lacking in vigorous exercise accelerates hair loss.
      Solution: Get up and play an hour a day.
      3.Few of us drink enough fluids to maintain normal hydration, even more serious than mere hair loss.
      Solution: Set up a plan to drink no less than 8-10 glasses of water a day, in addition to whatever other beverages you enjoy..
      4.Too frequent use of shampoos which contain lathering ingredients or surfactants which may irritate the scalp and cause itching and scratching, thus accelerating hair loss.
      Solution: Choose hair care products that are milder, or contain herbal formulas.
      5.Improper hair care techniques including too frequent use of treatments, hair coloring, blow drying, heat from curling irons and hot rollers which can increase the progression of hair loss. In this case, you need only look on your bathroom floor, sink, and counter tops.
      Solution: Eliminate those expensive trips to the salon, except for very special occasions. Consider getting an infrequent permanent, instead of exposing your hair to the daily ritual of “fixing” it. Slow down.

      Disease:

      Disease can take several forms, the psychological and the physiological. Stress as a result of a major life event such as pregnancy, loss of a loved one or divorce, loss of employment, etc., and major surgery can cause temporary hair loss which will eventually return to normal once the stress is dealt with. There are steps you can take to reduce their effects on your body, like getting more exercise. Seek out a competent professional to help you resolve the issues you are dealing with.

      Physiological causes include health conditions such as thyroid abnormalities, lupus, liver or kidney disease and diabetes. As these diseases are more serious than the hair loss, they are best diagnosed by your doctor. Others may be fungal infections, which can be treated effectively by over the counter medications. Another condition is called Alopecia Areata, is identified by circular patches of baldness, where the body is attacking the hair follicles. Cortisone shots in the affective areas are required, and the sooner the better.

      Unfortunately, the normal use of some medications for acne, and amphetamines such as those in diet pills can also cause the loss of hair. Check with your prescriber to insure your medications are not the cause.

      Aging

      Under normal conditions, our bodies change as we age. Men and women age differently. Estrogen and testosterone levels rise and fall in both sexes. Enzymes in the body act on the testosterone to form DHT. Once a woman enters menopause, her estrogen levels drop dramatically, increasing her testosterone levels. As men age, there testosterone levels drop and their estrogen levels increase. As the level of DHT increases, the hair follicles shrink. When they shrink enough, the blood flow is cut off, and they are unable to produce and push a new hair through the restricted follicle. As old hair dies, i

    1. norton g

      Could you mean “alopecia” which is an other word for “baldness” or loss of hair?

      There are many causes. The long list folows:

      Your hair goes through a cycle of growth and rest. At the end of the resting phase, the hair strand falls out and a new one begins to grow in its place. Once a hair is shed, the growth stage begins again.

      Most people normally shed 50 to 100 hairs a day. But with about 100,000 hairs in the scalp, this amount of hair loss shouldn’t cause noticeable thinning of the scalp hair.

      Gradual thinning is a normal part of aging. However, hair loss may lead to baldness when the rate of shedding exceeds the rate of regrowth, when new hair is thinner than the hair shed or when hair comes out in patches.

      Causes of specific types of hair loss

      Pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). In male- and female-pattern baldness, the time of growth shortens, and the hairs are not as thick or sturdy. With each growth cycle, the hairs become rooted more superficially and more easily fall out. Heredity likely plays a key role. Heredity also affects the age at which you begin to lose hair and the speed, pattern and extent of your baldness.

      Cicatricial (scarring) alopecia. This type of permanent hair loss occurs when inflammation damages and scars the hair follicle. This prevents new hair from growing. This condition can be seen in several skin conditions, including lupus erythematosus or lichen planus.

      Alopecia areata. This is classified as an autoimmune disease, but the cause is unknown. People who develop alopecia areata are generally in good health. A few people may have other autoimmune disorders including thyroid disease. Some scientists believe that some people are genetically predisposed to develop alopecia areata and that a trigger, such as a virus or something else in the environment, sets off the condition. A family history of alopecia areata makes you more likely to develop it. With alopecia areata, your hair generally grows back, but you may lose and regrow your hair a number of times.

      Telogen effluvium. This type of hair loss is usually due to a change in your normal hair cycle. It may occur when some type of shock to your system — emotional or physical — causes hair roots to be pushed prematurely into the resting state. The affected growing hairs from these hair roots fall out. In a month or two, the hair follicles become active again and new hair starts to grow. Telogen effluvium may follow emotional distress, such as a death in the family, or after a physiological stress, such as a high fever, sudden or excessive weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, surgery, or metabolic disturbances. Hair typically grows back once the condition that caused it corrects itself, but it usually take months.

      Traction alopecia. Excessive hairstyling or hairstyles that pull your hair too tightly cause traction alopecia. If the pulling is stopped before there’s scarring of your scalp and permanent damage to the root, hair usually grows back normally.
      Other causes of hair loss

      Poor nutrition. Having inadequate protein or iron in your diet or poor nourishment in other ways can cause you to experience hair loss. Fad diets, crash diets and certain illnesses, such as eating disorders, can cause poor nutrition.
      Medications. Certain drugs used to treat gout, arthritis, depression, heart problems and high blood pressure may cause hair loss in some people. Taking birth control pills also may result in hair loss for some women.

      Disease. Diabetes and lupus can cause hair loss.
      Medical treatments. Undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy may cause you to develop alopecia. Under these conditions, healthy, growing (anagen) hairs can be affected. After your treatment ends, your hair typically begins to regrow.

      Hormonal changes. Hormonal changes and imbalances can cause temporary hair loss. This could be due to pregnancy, having a baby, discontinuing birth control pills, beginning menopause, or an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. The hair loss may be delayed by three months following a hormonal change, and it’ll take another three months for new hair to grow back. During pregnancy, it’s normal to have thicker, more luxuriant hair. It’s also common to lose more hair than normal about three months after delivery. If a hormonal imbalance is associated with an overproduction of testosterone, there may be a thinning of hair over the crown of the scalp. Correcting hormonal imbalances may stop hair loss.

      Hair treatments. Chemicals used for dying, tinting, bleaching, straightening or permanent waves can cause hair to become damaged and break off if they are overused or used incorrectly. Overstyling and excessive brushing also can cause hair to fall out if the hair shaft becomes damaged.
      Scalp infection. Infections, such as ringworm, can invade the hair and skin of your scalp, leading to hair loss. Once infections are treated, hair generally grows back. Ringworm, a fungal infection, can usually be treated with a topical or oral antifungal medication.

      Trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder). Trichotillomania is a type of mental illness in which people have an irresistible urge to pull out their hair, whether it’s from their scalp, their eyebrows or other areas of their body. Hair pulling from the scalp often leaves them with patchy bald spots on their head, which they may go to great lengths to disguise. Causes of trichotillomania are still being researched, and no specific cause has yet been found.

  4. Sammistar24

    Anyone experience Telogen Effluvium?
    I’m 24 and apparently going through it according to my dermatologist and have been since about July 2011. In Sept when I saw him he said it would last about 3 more months then I should start to see the loss slowing down. I have seen the loss slow since late dec (went from about 150 to 70 daily w/ shower), however I’m not seeing much regrowth? Is that because it’s too soon? My hair is growing in length but I don’t see much filled in where the loss is significant. I see a few scraggly new hairs but I still see where the loss was/is. My derm said its not female patten baldness and I’ve been tested for deficiencies, lupus, thyroid problems…pretty much all came back normal. I did lose my mom to cancer but that was in mid 2010 and I noticed the loss in July 2011. I can get pretty stressed out at times. But does this sound temporary? Are my doctors right? It’s just discouraging when you see it slow down but not enough of a sign of regrowth (hopefully) yet. How long did it take for you to see regrowth enough to fill in enough to make a difference if you have experienced this? Are the signs of it slowing down an indicator that it is temporary and will grow back fully?

  5. ♥ i L0VE U S0 MUCH ♥

    what should i put on my hair??
    ok i noticed that i have a bald spot and it hasn’t been growing back do you guys know what can i put so it could grow back besides getting checked up with the doctor??? pleasssee..thanx

    1. mimi

      Your problem is called alopecia areata, it has several origins: pregnancy, birth pills, ulcerative colitis, autoimmune disease as lupus. And depending the origin can be treated with steroids, antivirals agents ,etc. This information could be useful for you. But just one important thing to remember, peace of mind, sleep well and praise the Lord are a very effective medicine.
      Alopecia Areata At A Glance
      Alopecia areata is a hair-loss condition which usually affects the scalp.
      Alopecia areata typically causes one or more patches of hair loss.
      Alopecia areata tends to affect younger individuals, both male and female.
      An autoimmune disorder, in which the immune system attacks hair follicles, is believed to cause alopecia areata.
      For most patients, the condition resolves without treatment within a year, but hair loss is sometimes permanent.
      A number of treatments are known to aid in hair regrowth. Multiple treatments may be necessary, and none consistently works for all patients.
      Many treatments are promoted which have not proven to be of benefit.

  6. Tee

    what should i do about hair loss ?
    everytime i brush my hair in the morning, or run my fingers through my hair, alot of strands of my hair fall out. what should i do ?

    1. Tamas M

      Your hair goes through a cycle of growth and rest. The course of each cycle varies by individual. But in general, the growth phase of scalp hair, known as anagen, typically lasts two to three years. During this time, your hair grows about 1 centimeter (just less than 1/2 inch) a month. The resting phase is called telogen. This phase typically lasts three to four months. At the end of the resting phase, the hair strand falls out and a new one begins to grow in its place. Once a hair is shed, the growth stage begins again.

      Most people normally shed 50 to 100 hairs a day. But with about 100,000 hairs in the scalp, this amount of hair loss shouldn’t cause noticeable thinning of the scalp hair.

      Gradual thinning is a normal part of aging. However, hair loss may lead to baldness when the rate of shedding exceeds the rate of regrowth, when new hair is thinner than the hair shed or when hair comes out in patches.

      Causes of specific types of hair loss

      * Pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). In male- and female-pattern baldness, the time of growth shortens, and the hairs are not as thick or sturdy. With each growth cycle, the hairs become rooted more superficially and more easily fall out. Heredity likely plays a key role. A history of androgenetic alopecia on either side of your family increases your risk of balding. Heredity also affects the age at which you begin to lose hair and the developmental speed, pattern and extent of your baldness.
      * Cicatricial (scarring) alopecia. This type of permanent hair loss occurs when inflammation damages and scars the hair follicle. This prevents new hair from growing. This condition can be seen in several skin conditions, including lupus erythematosus or lichen planus. It’s not known what triggers or causes this inflammation.
      * Alopecia areata. This is classified as an autoimmune disease, but the cause is unknown. People who develop alopecia areata are generally in good health. A few people may have other autoimmune disorders including thyroid disease. Some scientists believe that some people are genetically predisposed to develop alopecia areata and that a trigger, such as a virus or something else in the environment, sets off the condition. A family history of alopecia areata makes you more likely to develop it. With alopecia areata, your hair generally grows back, but you may lose and regrow your hair a number of times.
      * Telogen effluvium. This type of hair loss is usually due to a change in your normal hair cycle. It may occur when some type of shock to your system — emotional or physical — causes hair roots to be pushed prematurely into the resting state. The affected growing hairs from these hair roots fall out. In a month or two, the hair follicles become active again and new hair starts to grow. Telogen effluvium may follow emotional distress, such as a death in the family, or after a physiological stress, such as a high fever, sudden or excessive weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, surgery, or metabolic disturbances. Hair typically grows back once the condition that caused it corrects itself, but it usually take months.
      * Traction alopecia. Excessive hairstyling or hairstyles that pull your hair too tightly cause traction alopecia. If the pulling is stopped before there’s scarring of your scalp and permanent damage to the root, hair usually grows back normally.

    1. FACR_1

      Most likely it’s because of stress… or..

      Your hair goes through a cycle of growth and rest. The course of each cycle varies by individual. But in general, the growth phase of scalp hair, known as anagen, typically lasts two to three years. During this time, your hair grows about 1 centimeter (just less than 1/2 inch) a month. The resting phase is called telogen. This phase typically lasts three to four months. At the end of the resting phase, the hair strand falls out and a new one begins to grow in its place. Once a hair is shed, the growth stage begins again.

      Most people normally shed 50 to 100 hairs a day. But with about 100,000 hairs in the scalp, this amount of hair loss shouldn’t cause noticeable thinning of the scalp hair.

      Gradual thinning is a normal part of aging. However, hair loss may lead to baldness when the rate of shedding exceeds the rate of regrowth, when new hair is thinner than the hair shed or when hair comes out in patches.

      Causes of specific types of hair loss

      Pattern baldness (androgenetic alopecia). In male- and female-pattern baldness, the time of growth shortens, and the hairs are not as thick or sturdy. With each growth cycle, the hairs become rooted more superficially and more easily fall out. Heredity likely plays a key role. A history of androgenetic alopecia on either side of your family increases your risk of balding. Heredity also affects the age at which you begin to lose hair and the developmental speed, pattern and extent of your baldness.
      Cicatricial (scarring) alopecia. This type of permanent hair loss occurs when inflammation damages and scars the hair follicle. This prevents new hair from growing. This condition can be seen in several skin conditions, including lupus erythematosus or lichen planus. It’s not known what triggers or causes this inflammation.
      Alopecia areata. This is classified as an autoimmune disease, but the cause is unknown. People who develop alopecia areata are generally in good health. A few people may have other autoimmune disorders including thyroid disease. Some scientists believe that some people are genetically predisposed to develop alopecia areata and that a trigger, such as a virus or something else in the environment, sets off the condition. A family history of alopecia areata makes you more likely to develop it. With alopecia areata, your hair generally grows back, but you may lose and regrow your hair a number of times.
      Telogen effluvium. This type of hair loss is usually due to a change in your normal hair cycle. It may occur when some type of shock to your system — emotional or physical — causes hair roots to be pushed prematurely into the resting state. The affected growing hairs from these hair roots fall out. In a month or two, the hair follicles become active again and new hair starts to grow. Telogen effluvium may follow emotional distress, such as a death in the family, or after a physiological stress, such as a high fever, sudden or excessive weight loss, nutritional deficiencies, surgery, or metabolic disturbances. Hair typically grows back once the condition that caused it corrects itself, but it usually take months.
      Traction alopecia. Excessive hairstyling or hairstyles that pull your hair too tightly cause traction alopecia. If the pulling is stopped before there’s scarring of your scalp and permanent damage to the root, hair usually grows back normally.
      Other causes of hair loss

      Poor nutrition. Having inadequate protein or iron in your diet or poor nourishment in other ways can cause you to experience hair loss. Fad diets, crash diets and certain illnesses, such as eating disorders, can cause poor nutrition.
      Medications. Certain drugs used to treat gout, arthritis, depression, heart problems and high blood pressure may cause hair loss in some people. Taking birth control pills also may result in hair loss for some women.
      Disease. Diabetes and lupus can cause hair loss.
      Medical treatments. Undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy may cause you to develop alopecia. Under these conditions, healthy, growing (anagen) hairs can be affected. After your treatment ends, your hair typically begins to regrow.
      Hormonal changes. Hormonal changes and imbalances can cause temporary hair loss. This could be due to pregnancy, having a baby, discontinuing birth control pills, beginning menopause, or an overactive or underactive thyroid gland. The hair loss may be delayed by three months following a hormonal change, and it’ll take another three months for new hair to grow back. During pregnancy, it’s normal to have thicker, more luxuriant hair. It’s also common to lose more hair than normal about three months after delivery. If a hormonal imbalance is associated with an overproduction of testosterone, there may be a thinning of hair over the crown of the scalp. Correcting hormonal imbalances may stop hair loss.
      Hair treatments. Chemicals used for dying, tinting, bleaching, straightening or perm

    1. Bosley Medical

      Yes, hair loss is one of the first symptoms of lupus, and the extent of hair loss varies with each individual who is diagnosed with lupus. Some may experience extreme hair loss or hair loss in patches while others may experience minor hair loss; however, the good news is, is that after successful treatment, regrowth of hair is expected, although at a slow rate.

      If additional symptoms are present (fatigue, rashes, depression), you may be able to determine whether or not your hair loss is caused by lupus. There are several other causes of hair loss, including but not limited to high levels of stress, changes in diet and other causes of hormone imbalances. So to precisely determine the cause of your hair loss, you should consult with your physician or dermatologist. You can also set up a free consultation with a Bosley professional to learn more about the causes of hair loss and the recommended treatment options available. I hope that helps answer your question and good luck!

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