An ulcer is a sore on the skin or a mucous membrane often associated with the disintegration of tissue and the formation of pus. Ulcers can result in the complete loss of the epidermis, the dermis, and in more advanced cases subcutaneous fat. Ulcers that appear in the skin are distinguished by inflamed tissue with an area of reddened skin. Skin ulcers are most often associated with diabetes, but have numerous other causes including exposure to heat or cold, irritation, and problems with blood circulation.

Lower extremity ulcers and amputations are an increasing problem among individuals with diabetes. Data from the 1983-90 National Hospital Discharge Surveys (NHDS) indicate that 6% of hospitalizations listing diabetes on the discharge record also listed a lower extremity ulcer condition. In hospitalizations that listed diabetes, chronic ulcers were present in 2.7% of the patients. The average length of stay for diabetes discharges with ulcer conditions was 59% longer than for diabetes discharges without ulcers. Recent data suggest that foot ulcers precede approximately 85% of nontraumatic lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in individuals with diabetes.

More than half of lower limb amputations in the United States occur in people with diagnosed diabetes. NHDS data also indicate that there were  about 54,000 diabetic individuals who underwent  nontraumatic LEAs in 1990. Lower extremity amputations are more common in individuals with diabetes than without diabetes.

Several studies have demonstrated the beneficial effect of patient education on reducing LEAs. A randomized trial showed that patient self-care was helpful in preventing serious foot lesions. Several amputation prevention programs have reported striking pre- and post-intervention differences in amputation frequency after instituting comprehensive, multidisciplinary foot care programs. Part of the hospital care and self care program should be the administration of a topical growth factor gel to the wound.

What are the types and symptoms of ulcers? Ulcers may or may not be painful. The patient generally has a swollen leg and may feel burning or itching. There may also be a rash, redness, brown discoloration or dry, scaly skin. The three most common types of leg and foot ulcers are:

 

  1. Venous stasis ulcers
  2. Arterial (ischemic ulcers)
  3. Neurotrophic (diabetic ulcers)

 

Ulcers are typically defined by the appearance of the ulcer, the ulcer location, and the way the borders and surrounding skin of the ulcer look as defined below:

1. Venous stasis ulcers

Venous ulcers are located below the knee and are primarily found on the inner part of the leg, just above the ankle. The base of a venous ulcer is usually red and may also be covered with yellow fibrous tissue, or there may be a green or yellow discharge if the ulcer is infected. Fluid drainage can be significant with this type of ulcer.

The borders of a venous ulcer are usually irregularly shaped and the surrounding skin is often discolored and swollen. It may even feel warm or hot. With edema (swelling) the skin may appear shiny and tight. The skin of the lower leg may also have brown or purple discoloration known as “stasis skin changes.”

Venous stasis ulcers are common in patients who have a history of leg swelling, long standing varicose veins, or a history of blood clots in either the superficial or the deep veins of the legs. Ulcers may affect one or both legs.

Venous ulcers affect 500,000 to 600,000 people in the United States every year and account for 80 to 90% of all leg ulcers.

2. Arterial (ischemic)

Arterial ulcers are usually located on the feet and often occur on the heels, tips of toes, between the toes where the toes rub against one another or anywhere the bones may protrude and rub against bed sheets, socks or shoes. Arterial ulcers also commonly occur in the nail bed if the toenail cuts into the skin or if the patient has had recent aggressive toe nail trimming or an ingrown toenail removed.

The base of an arterial or ischemic ulcer usually does not bleed. It has a yellow, brown, gray, or blackened color. The borders and surrounding skin usually appear as though they have been punched out. If irritation or infection are present, there may or may not be swelling and redness around the ulcer base. There may also be redness on the entire foot when the leg is dangled; this redness often turns to a pale white/yellow color when the leg is elevated.

Arterial ulcers are usually very painful, especially at night. The patient may instinctively dangle their foot over the side of the bed to relieve the pain. Patients usually have prior knowledge of poor circulation in their legs and may have an accompanying disorder.

3. Neurotrophic (diabetic)

Neurotrophic ulcers are usually located at increased pressure points on the bottom of the feet. However, neurotrophic ulcers related to trauma can occur anywhere on the foot. These types of ulcers occur primarily in people with diabetes although anyone who has impaired sensation of the feet can be affected.

The base of the ulcer is variable, depending on the patient’s circulation and may appear pink/red or brown/black. The borders of the ulcer are punched out and the surrounding skin is typically calloused.

Neuropathy and peripheral artery disease are often co-morbid in people who have diabetes. Nerve damage (neuropathy) in the feet often results in a loss of foot sensation and changes in the sweat-producing glands. Thus, a person may not feel the development of foot calluses or cracks, increasing the risk of injury or infection. Symptoms of neuropathy include tingling, numbness, and burning or pain.

What causes leg ulcers? Leg ulcers may be caused by:

  1. Poor circulation, often caused by arteriosclerosis
  2. Diabetes
  3. Venous insufficiency (a failure of the valves in the veins of the leg that causes congestion and slowing of blood circulation in the veins)
  4. Other disorders of clotting and circulation that may or may not be related to atherosclerosis
  5. Renal (kidney) failure
  6. Hypertension (treated or untreated)
  7. Lymphedema (a buildup of fluid that causes swelling in the legs or feet)
  8. Inflammatory diseases including vasculitis, lupus, scleroderma or other rheumatological conditions
  9. Other medical conditions such as high cholesterol, heart disease, high blood pressure, sickle cell anemia, bowel disorders
  10. History of smoking (either current or past)
  11. Pressure caused by lying in one position for too long
  12. Genetics (they may be hereditary)
  13. A malignancy (tumor or cancerous mass)
  14. Infections
  15. Certain medications

 

How are leg ulcers diagnosed and treated?

First, the patient’s medical history is evaluated. A wound specialist will examine the wound thoroughly and may perform tests such as X-rays, MRIs, CT scans and noninvasive vascular studies to help develop a treatment plan. The goals of treatment are to relieve pain, speed recovery, and heal the wound. Each patient’s treatment plan should be individualized based on the patient’s health, medical condition, and ability to care for the wound.

Treatment options for all ulcers may include:

  1. Antibiotics, if an infection is present
  2. Anti-platelet or anti-clotting medications to prevent a blood clot
  3. Topical wound care therapies (including topical growth factors)
  4. Compression garments
  5. Prosthetics or orthotics, available to restore or enhance normal lifestyle function

Venous ulcers are treated somewhat differently with compression of the leg to minimize edema or swelling. Compression treatments may include wearing compression stockings, multilayer compression wraps, or wrapping an ACE bandage or dressing from the toes or foot to the area below the knee. The type of compression treatment prescribed is determined by the physician based on the characteristics of the ulcer base and amount of drainage from the ulcer.

The type of dressing prescribed for ulcers is determined by the type of ulcer and the appearance at the base of the ulcer. Types of dressings include:

  1. Moist to moist dressings
  2. Hydrogels/hydrocolloids
  3. Alginate dressings
  4. Collagen wound dressings
  5. Debriding agents
  6. Antimicrobial dressings
  7. Composite dressings
  8. Synthetic skin substitutes
  9. Growth factor ointment

 

Treatments of arterial ulcer vary, depending on the severity of the arterial disease. Non-invasive vascular tests provide the physician with the diagnostic tools to assess the potential for wound healing. Depending on the patient’s condition, the physician may recommend invasive testing, endovascular therapy or bypass surgery to restore circulation to the affected leg. The goals for arterial ulcer treatment include:

  1. Providing adequate protection of the surface of the skin
  2. Preventing new ulcers
  3. Removing contact irritation to the existing ulcer
  4. Monitoring for signs and symptoms of infection that may involve the soft tissues or bone.

 

Neurotrophic ulcers are treated are treated by avoiding pressure and weight-bearing on the affected leg until the ulcer has started to heal. Regular debridement (the removal of infected tissue) is usually necessary before a neurotrophic ulcer can heal. Frequently, special shoes or orthotic devices must be worn.

Wound Care at Home

As stated in the aforementioned section, a proper wound care program including home wound care by the patient is critical to the healing process. Patients should be given careful instructions to care for their wounds at home. These instructions include:

  1. Keeping the wound clean
  2. Changing the dressing as directed
  3. Taking prescribed medications as directed
  4. Applying topical growth factors as directed
  5. Drinking plenty of fluids
  6. Following a healthy diet, as recommended, including plenty of fruits and vegetables
  7. Exercising regularly, as directed by a physician
  8. Wearing appropriate shoes
  9. Wearing compression wraps, if appropriate, as directed

 

The treatment of all ulcers begins with careful skin and foot care. Inspection of the feet and skin by the patient is very important, especially for people with diabetes. Detecting and treating foot and skin sores early can help prevent infection and prevent the sore from becoming worse. Here are some guidelines:

  1. Gently wash the affected area on your leg and your feet every day with mild soap and lukewarm water. Washing helps loosen and remove dead skin and other debris or drainage from the ulcer. Gently and thoroughly dry your skin and feet, including between the toes. Do not rub your skin or area between the toes.
  2. Every day, examine your legs as well as the tops and bottoms of your feet and the areas between your toes. Look for any blisters, cuts, cracks, scratches or other sores. Also check for redness, increased warmth, ingrown toenails, corns and calluses. Use a mirror to view the leg or foot if necessary, or have a family member look at the area for you.
  3. Once or twice a day, apply a lanolin-based cream to your legs and soles and top of your feet to prevent dry skin and cracking. Do not apply lotion between your toes or on areas where there is an open sore or cut. If the skin is extremely dry, use the moisturizing cream more often.
  4. Care for your toenails regularly. Cut your toenails after bathing, when they are soft. Cut toenails straight across and smooth with an emery board.
  5. Do not self-treat corns, calluses or other foot problems. Go to a podiatrist to treat these conditions.
  6. Don’t wait to treat a minor foot or skin problem. Follow your physcian’s guidelines.
  7. Ask your physician about using a growth factor ointment on the open sore area.

 

How can ulcers be prevented? Controlling risk factors can help you prevent ulcers from developing or becoming worse. Here are some ways to reduce your risk factors:

  1. Quit smoking
  2. Manage your blood pressure
  3. Control your blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels by making dietary changes and taking medications as prescribed
  4. Limit your intake of sodium (salt)
  5. Manage your diabetes and other health conditions, if applicable
  6. Exercise a€” start a walking program after speaking with your physcian
  7. Lose weight if you are overweight
  8. Ask your physcian about aspirin therapy to prevent blood clots

 


Lupus Bible

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38 Comments on Lupus Skin Rash On Legs

  1. redbeauty says:

    Could I have the lupus disease?
    Can lupus cause a rash on your vagina lip,ex. red circle painless nor itchy rash on one vagina lip? I have rashes on my legs that are sorta similar to the rashes of lupus on the skin. That doesn’t itch either, n i read up on it and the site showed pics and that the rashes usually doesn’t itch and the are circle n so are mine. I have a daughter and I’m hoping and praying that she doesn’t develop any symptoms like this. I cry about this all the time cause idk what’s causing this or anything and i’m scared. So can lupus cause a lesion in the vagina area too? I have had a false positive for syphilis the vdrl and the rpr was reactive, but the tp-pa was non reactive n the dr at the clinical told me i don’t have it n so did my dr. Anyway they showed me numerous things that could’ve caused the false positive and lupus was on there and whateva is wrong with me is chronic, because that was also on the paper to and so was rhu. arthritis. All serious answers please n thanks n advance. (= I’m calling someone at the lupus clinic later on today and see what they can do for me since i doesn’t have insurance. Hope they can help!
    n i don’t have herpes either… don’t have all those big nasty looking sores in my private area and that was only one time with the thing in the viginal area. N herpes ITCH… DUMB ASS… Know someone who have it.

  2. abav23 says:

    Is there any Impact of lupus (DLE) on pregnancy?
    I am 28yrs old..I was suffering from eczema for 8-10yrs that was frm period 1992 to 2002 approx. and i was under medication for that..now i m having black marks on my legs and m not having any medicines currently..later i had another skin issue called lupus(DLE),some rashes wherever i get exposed to sun.which started in 2006 and i was under medication for sometime…I got married in 2007 and its gng to be 2 yrs..we r planning for a family for more than a year,nothng has wrked till now…..We have also consulted gyaenic, done scanning and all tests no problems in the reports for both of us..could u pls help me out whether this can be the problem behind it?

    • Angie says:

      I would consult a rheumatologist or immunologist with your concerns. I have Sjogren’s Syndrome, another autoimmune disorder which affects the skin and organs. I have had two successful pregnancies and both of my children are healthy. The specialists that deal with Lupus would have great knowledge about your issues. I wish you the best of luck.

  3. Reiley R says:

    Purple skin after shower and pimply like bumps?
    Ok, so I take showers. they’re not too hot… i don’t like to burn myself. while im in the shower, my skin seems fine, but as soon as i turn the water off, my whole body, but especially my legs, get this purple lacy rash thing that itches like CRAZY. once i step out and rub myself down with my towel (dries and itches at the same time) it goes to red, then fades back to my normal skin color, but remains itchy for about half an hour or so.
    my question is why???

    also my arms get pimple like bumps on them and get very red and rashy looking if i wear a sweater or something of that sort. not t shirts or smooth fabrics like that, but even cable knit ones give me rashes that itch. i don’t know if this is related or the same thing or something totally different from the shower thing, but it seems like there’s something wrong with my skin.

    also, if i itch my chest with even the lightest of touch, it turns red and rashy for hours.

    my mom has had lupus of the skin for 15 years as well as rosatia (spell?) and fibromyalga (spell?) so i worry about my health a lot because she has had so many problems.

    i would just like to know if this is something i should look into or not!

  4. tammy_lynn2003 says:

    i have lupus and fibromyalgia and im diabetic,what im concerned about is this skin rash that?
    on my legs above my ankles and below my calfs and on my arms above my wrists and below my elbows.i do not use any body soaps with smells and i do not use any clothing soaps or softners with any smells or dies and i dont understand what the prob is,i stay out of the sun and i dont eat bad foods im at my witts on what this is, and as far as my house being unclean thats not a case i do not use harsh cleaing chemicals but i have noticed when i am asleep those places ive mentioned on my body sweat and then itch,so this is off,any way i need some feedback and my house does any have any fleas or bugs im very up on that

  5. 4 due in Sept 2011 says:

    doctor testing for lupus? because of rash?
    rash started small on arm thought was an allergic reaction to something,

    then it spread on more of arm and leg thought was staph infection
    treated no luck

    its not staph its also not scabes or bed bugs,

    they are saying it looks like blood pockets where blood is comming to the skin surface and then some spots where those are inflamed

    it has spread and is all over my body but the main spots is my arms and fingers and palms of hands

    also had severe back pain since around the time this rash started and very tired and no appitite hardly

    what would you think i can take pictures if you want to see if you think you may know what it is

  6. Mandy Cakes says:

    This is a lot to ask, I know. But if someone could review my APA paper I would GREATLY appreciate it. ?
    I think my greatest problem is with grammer errors and my in-text citations. Also, all of those citations that repeat themselves look funny to me. They can’t be right? Can they? I’m also confused with secondary citations. I think they’re a no no but I can’t get a clear answer on what they are. Here’s the paper. Please kindly review if you’d like. I’d love yah for it.

    Kisses
    Mandi

    (Title page not included)

    Introduction
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that permits the affected body to build antibodies to attack its own cells as if they were foreign. There are three main types of lupus. They are discoid, drug induced, and Systemic lupus erythematosus (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Doctors must be careful in diagnosing lupus since it can easily be confused with other diseases (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Lupus is capable of attacking any part of the body but for the most part it mainly affects the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The cause of Lupus is currently unknown. Lupus truly is a sickness of mystery since the cause and cure have currently been unidentified. However, there are known genetic (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) and environmental (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008) aspects that have been known to trigger this illness. On an inspiring note, there is presently a study being conducted with mice in search for the cure of lupus.

    Discussion
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that is known to be a chronic (continuous or reoccurring) inflammatory illness that has the ability to attack any region of the body (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The symptoms of the disease are painful or swollen joints and muscle pain, unexplained fever, red rashes, chest pain when breathing deeply, loss of hair, pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress (also known as Raynaud’s phenomenon), sensitivity to the sun swelling in legs or around eyes, mouth ulcers, swollen glands and extreme fatigue (WebMD, 2008). Those that suffer from lupus may never have the same symptoms as another person with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). However, the most common areas of the body affected are the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).. Also in most cases in order for a doctor to diagnose lupus the patient must illustrate at least four (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) of the listed symptoms.
    The actual cause of the disease is unknown. However, there are genetic and environmental characteristics that could trigger lupus to develop. Many patients that suffer from lupus have a genetic association with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Lupus could be the result of mutated genes of interferon and the genes that play vital roles in regulating the immune response (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). If a patient has a genetic link to lupus there are also environmental aspects that could trigger lupus. They are infection, ultraviolet light, certain drugs like; procainamide, hydralazine, and quinidine (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008), and extreme stress (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Factors that potentially contribute to the progression of lupus are interleukins and interferons (immune molecules). Interleukins and interferons have been shown to control the autoantibody release in response to certain bodily stimuli (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).
    Lupus commonly affects women, African Americans, and Asians more than any other group (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Since 90% of all patients with lupus are female, women between the ages of 15-50 should be tested for lupus if they portray at least one of the symptoms (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Also, there is an increased risk of lupus in people who already have the Epstein-Barr virus. (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008)
    The healthy immune system’s mission is to protect the body from infections and foreign objects within the body. When the immune system is working properly it will recognize the foreign bacteria, virus, or objects as non-self. Upon recognition that something does not belong, it will build antibodies against the unwanted agent, attack and destroy it (Marieb, 2009, p. 408 & 410). However, the activities of the immune system are much different when the body is affected with lupus. Instead of the body producing antibodies against foreign bacterial that do not belong, the immune system will produce an autoantibody that attacks the body’s own cells and tissues. The reason for this is because they can not recognize their own cells or tissue as self. When an autoantibody attack occurs, the autoantibodies will attach themselves to various tissues and cells (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). When this happens the body’s inflammatory response occurs. The same thing happens when we have been hurt and the tissue has truly been damaged.
    There are a few different ways Lupus can affect the body, for example in nearly all individuals that suffer from lup

    • mgunnycappo says:

      It’s a pretty good paper but in the beginning you made an error. There are four types of Lupus. Neo Natal (babies), Drug Induced, Discoid and Systemic. Then after that you should state that your paper is talking about Systemic Lupus because they symptoms you go on to describe are those of Systemic Lupus. Your citings follow the APA guidelines. I couldn’t see the entire paper as it got cut off. Also couldn’t see your works cited page. You don’t show any quotation marks so I’m assuming that you didn’t plagerize any of the information directly from the material.

  7. Mandy Cakes says:

    This is a lot to ask, I know. But if someone could review my APA paper I would GREATLY appreciate it. ?
    I think my greatest problem is with grammer errors and my in-text citations. Also, all of those citations that repeat themselves look funny to me. They can’t be right? Can they? I’m also confused with secondary citations. I think they’re a no no but I can’t get a clear answer on what they are. Here’s the paper. Please kindly review if you’d like. I’d love yah for it.

    Kisses
    Mandi

    (Title page & reference page not included)

    Introduction
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that permits the affected body to build antibodies to attack its own cells as if they were foreign. There are three main types of lupus. They are discoid, drug induced, and Systemic lupus erythematosus (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Doctors must be careful in diagnosing lupus since it can easily be confused with other diseases (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Lupus is capable of attacking any part of the body but for the most part it mainly affects the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The cause of Lupus is currently unknown. Lupus truly is a sickness of mystery since the cause and cure have currently been unidentified. However, there are known genetic (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) and environmental (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008) aspects that have been known to trigger this illness. On an inspiring note, there is presently a study being conducted with mice in search for the cure of lupus.

    Discussion
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that is known to be a chronic (continuous or reoccurring) inflammatory illness that has the ability to attack any region of the body (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The symptoms of the disease are painful or swollen joints and muscle pain, unexplained fever, red rashes, chest pain when breathing deeply, loss of hair, pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress (also known as Raynaud’s phenomenon), sensitivity to the sun swelling in legs or around eyes, mouth ulcers, swollen glands and extreme fatigue (WebMD, 2008). Those that suffer from lupus may never have the same symptoms as another person with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). However, the most common areas of the body affected are the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).. Also in most cases in order for a doctor to diagnose lupus the patient must illustrate at least four (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) of the listed symptoms.
    The actual cause of the disease is unknown. However, there are genetic and environmental characteristics that could trigger lupus to develop. Many patients that suffer from lupus have a genetic association with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Lupus could be the result of mutated genes of interferon and the genes that play vital roles in regulating the immune response (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). If a patient has a genetic link to lupus there are also environmental aspects that could trigger lupus. They are infection, ultraviolet light, certain drugs like; procainamide, hydralazine, and quinidine (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008), and extreme stress (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Factors that potentially contribute to the progression of lupus are interleukins and interferons (immune molecules). Interleukins and interferons have been shown to control the autoantibody release in response to certain bodily stimuli (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).
    Lupus commonly affects women, African Americans, and Asians more than any other group (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Since 90% of all patients with lupus are female, women between the ages of 15-50 should be tested for lupus if they portray at least one of the symptoms (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Also, there is an increased risk of lupus in people who already have the Epstein-Barr virus. (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008)
    The healthy immune system’s mission is to protect the body from infections and foreign objects within the body. When the immune system is working properly it will recognize the foreign bacteria, virus, or objects as non-self. Upon recognition that something does not belong, it will build antibodies against the unwanted agent, attack and destroy it (Marieb, 2009, p. 408 & 410). However, the activities of the immune system are much different when the body is affected with lupus. Instead of the body producing antibodies against foreign bacterial that do not belong, the immune system will produce an autoantibody that attacks the body’s own cells and tissues. The reason for this is because they can not recognize their own cells or tissue as self. When an autoantibody attack occurs, the autoantibodies will attach themselves to various tissues and cells (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). When this happens the body’s inflammatory response occurs. The same thing happens when we have been hurt and the tissue has truly been damaged.
    There are a few different ways Lupus can affect the body, for example in nearly all individuals tha

    • slawekp2001 says:

      Get rid of all the citations that are repeating themselves,that a big no no.Use each citation only once ok.I think alround its great and you should get a good grade.Hope it helps

  8. Shelly H says:

    can someone who has lupus give me some advice?
    for the past 5 months…i’ve had a spreading rash on my body…started on my chest (for about 3 months)…didn’t panic about that….but then it spread to my leg, shoulders and arms. I then booked an apt with a well know dermatologist practice in the area. I saw a young trainee and she told me i had ringworm…gave me 2 weeks worth of medication and asked me to get blood work done.
    this didn’t work so when i went back the 2 weeks later…another doctor met with me and said i’m sorry but you don’t have ringworm…we believe its lupus. she said we need to take a skin sample to do a biopsy and will get back to you within 10 days.
    friday willl be the 10th day…but since i’ve met with them 5 days ago….its gotten even worse…should i call up today ????
    also what is the treatment ???
    what helps to cover up the rash ??? spray tan ????
    i just need to know as much info as possible about lupus…i’ve googled of course but i want to hear from someone who has it.
    i have had hair loss….some fatigue (but maybe thats in my head )…and my wrists do ache in winter time……i’m 28 years old !! female
    i know everyone talks about the butterfly rash…i do not have this. – no rash on my face of yet.
    just the other areas i mentioned…starting to see tiny spots coming on my hands and feet.

  9. Lulin the Nephilim says:

    Peculiar symptoms..? What’s wrong with me?
    If you are not in the medical field or studying medicine or have not experienced these symptoms as well, then please don’t give your input. If you know someone that has had these symptoms, that is acceptable, I am willing to hear anyones opinion except from those that have no idea what they are talking about or have something nasty to say.
    I have a long list of symptoms; I am not a hypochondriac; I don’t have insurance so I can’t see a doctor about it right now.
    I have nearly all the symptoms of Lupus and Cushings Disease, but my previous doctor last year dismissed my concerns and diagnosed me with Poly cystic Ovarian Disease, Fibromyalgia, and Hepatitis B. My PCOS diagnoses was just him saying he’s sure I have that because of some symptoms. I had blood work and my ovaries came back just fine, yet I was still diagnosed with PCOS anyway.
    Ok, symptoms: Daily fatigue, awful back and shoulder pain, upper body obesity, a rounded face, increased fat around the neck, and relatively slender arms and legs,bruises easily, and heals poorly., never developed breasts, no period for over a year (I’m 25), thinning hair on scalp, but hirotism (excessive body hair), stomach discomfort, urine smells very strong of ammonia without signs that it’s a UTI. Dark circles under my eyes, excessive thirst, bright red cheeks, diagnosed with osteoperosis I’m 25!!! skin problems including frequent acne around my chin (I never had acne as a teen), Depression & Anxiety, Keratosis Pilaris on my upper arms (the excess production of keratin, creates a goose-bump appearance), boils and bumps on butt, now a rash on my butt! I know I sound disgusting, but please don’t make me feel worse than I already do about myself. Please help me out if you are familiar with these problems… I’m sure I have other problems that I’m not contributing to the list, so if you want to ask if I have other symptoms, please ask and I will answer asap.
    Thank you both for your responses, however – I have already been tested numerous times for thyroid problems and they function very well. As for diabeties, my fasting glycemia level is 79-80, so I’m nowhere near diabeties, I’m closer to hypoglycemia, but not that either. As for meningitus, I was also tested for that a while ago and that was negative. I have Hep B. so that could explain a liver problem, since Hep B eats at your liver when in flare. I was told to keep an eye on a stomach rash or soreness around the liver, which I don’t have. So I’m not concerned about a liver problem right now. Anyone else have any ideas?
    My BMI is high, it’s 27. I am just below obesity, which really sucks. I used to be very thin and active – age 20/21 I was 80lbs lighter and much more active. Over 5 years I have gained 80lbs and pain has overwhelmed me to the point where I am not as active. I play with my son and I am a postal worker – so I get mild/moderate exercise, but at the end of the day, I’m wiped out and in pain. For osteo – I consume a lot of Vit D and normally take supplements. Lupus, I was unaware of the plastics! I am constantly drinking from plastic bottles and cans without washing. I only run my fruits & veggies under a cold tap for maybe 30 seconds before consuming… so I guess that’s bad. Steroids, I can’t recall ever taking any – but it’s possible.

  10. Alanarama says:

    can anyone with lupus help please?
    i have recently been diagnose with raynauds syndrome which i understand can be a symtom of lupus.
    i have been to the doctors and bloods have been taken and sent off to find the cause of my raynauds i am just waiting for the results, but i am extremely worried. i have other symptoms of lupus too i just didnt realise they were symptoms of it.
    here goes
    ranaud’s symdrome
    white patches of skin near my eyes, genitalia, hips, and underarms
    butterfly rash
    fatigue
    aching knees (comes and goes)
    random nose bleeds (althouh i havent had one in a while)
    really red blistered toes
    chest pain when i breathe in sometimes(can be in my shoulder too)
    feelings of nausea or being sick for aparently no reason
    fever-i always feel freezing and have to wrap up but my boyfriend tells me iam really hot but i insist i am freezing cold
    abdominal pain and wierd feelings in my stomach
    red spots on my skin that come and go
    tingling and numbness in my arms mainly but sometimes in my legs
    i have been ill several times and they found exess protein in my unrine
    i get like blisters on my fingers and toes
    mostiof the time i want to do something but just feel “whats the point” or “im too tired”

    i think really what im wanting is your opinions if it could be lupus? or could it be something else? i guess i am just looking for reassurance. any help will be greatly appreciated, and any advice too, thanks xx

  11. carol says:

    Is there a doctor in Chicago or Southwest Suburbs who can help me?
    Terribly ill for 33 months with burning rashes, blotches and burning skin without them. The blotches never go away, the rashes do somewhat with hydrocortisone cream, but always come back on my arms, legs, abdomen, back of thighs, and butt. Sometimes my eyes feel like someone is sticking needles in them, and they have been red for 33 months and burning and itching. Muscle spasms, muscle twitching, burning in mouth, and bad taste. Blurred vision occasionaly, nausea, severe with occasional vomiting, dizzy. Can hardly eat or even drink much so constanly dehydrated.
    Also a feeling as if someone put ice cubes on my ears and scalp. My mouth, hands, feet and ears turn so red, I almost look purple. abdominal cramps so bad I want to die, no diarrhea. Terrible fatigue, I imagine from not eating and sleeping. Only the gastroenterologist (diagnosed with hiatal hernia, ulcer, colitis, diverticulosis, liver cysts, ovarian cyst – found during a cat scan, endoscopic, and colonoscopy) and the allergist (who said no allergy, histamine level low, no lupus or thyroid or adrenal disease,- the other doctors, and many emergency visits ended up with the same thing-
    antihistamines, steroids, tranquilizers, and antidepressants that didn’t work, and a few almost killed me. I am in agony, the pain is on a scale off 1-10 anywhere from a 3-8, most of the time 7-8.
    I am constantly in the shower for the burning, probably psychological that it works, I don’t know what to do. I do have darvocet for pain, not worth taking for mild, take it for moderate pain, knock myself out with sleeping pills for the severe. I can many days barely make it to the bathroom, so I am alone with no human contact, and rarely even get to Church, which I love dearly, or spend time with my grandchildren who are my life. The other day I could not even sit in the park for more than 15 minutes watching them. If someone can help me. The doctors, took my insurance, copays, and did nothing more than repeat blood tests that were already taken 15 times, then they send a bill for copays. I am in a living hell. Of course I am agitated, right now my scalp felt like someone stabbed me with a knife. have to get off. Please, someone help me, carol m
    Also, sometimes my whole body shakes, and my thinking is ubelievably foggy. I am in front of a fan 24 hours a day.
    While I appreciate everyone trying to answer my question, I think the point has been missed; no sarcasm intended. The answer was comparable to yes there are medcines in the pharmacy. That will do me no good. I need to know if anyone knows a specific doctor who actually listens to their patients, takes tests, and really tries to find out what is wrong, The doctors I saw, gave me pills, and told me to see a shrink. In the meantime I am getting worse. Not long ago, I was in so much pain, I was standing in the middle of my bedroom, couldn’t sit, or touch anything, the pain was so bad. , crying. had just been to the emergency room two days before. They did nothing and I had to pay cabfare home. If anyone goes to or knows such a doctor I would appreciate knowing their name. thank you. I knock myself out all day or night cause I cannot take the pain, etc. anymore. Of course I get immune to the pills, as I am now, I have not slept since I don’t know when. I can’t see straight.

  12. Anonymous says:

    Could it possibly be Lupus?
    I’m very tired of being treated as though I’m just going nuts. A hypochondriac in a sense. I’m not…I’m sick. Without much to back up what is causing it. The symptoms mainly started when I was around 18…I’m 24 now. I’ve been to the doctor many times being told the same thing. I’m perfectly fine. One doctor finally took into consideration I had a list of symptoms too long for my age and sent me to a digestive specialist. I wasn’t able to continue seeing the specialist, but from the two visits I was able to attend, he determined I had GERD. But I just keep getting worse. It’s not just my upper digestive system, it’s my entire digestive system. Nothing seems to work properly. I’m vomiting in the mornings from acid and bile building up in my stomach throughout the night. I can hardly eat anything without feeling nauseated afterward. My stool varies in color and texture. Some days it’s near normal, others is sticky, others it’s like water. I stay pretty bloated the majority of the time. So bloated and gassy that I have to where a pant size larger than usual. I have to pee once or twice an hour. I get chest pains that are more than likely associated with pain in my esophagus. It’s pretty deep and aching.

    Aside from my digestive problems, just last year I started developing eye and skin problems. I’ve never had any problems with my eyes. Never needed glasses. I’ve started having static like vision (visual snow), I sometimes see bright spots (seeing stars), I’ve noticed an increase in floaters in my vision. Some have came and gone…others are still around. I feel what feels like sparks bursting in the inner corners of my eyes several times a week. I see ghosting. Distant objects are now slightly blurred and my eyes tend to stay dry. All of this developed within the last year. The eye doctor said I had developed an astigmatism. Seems like more is going on than that…just in the last 5 months since my visit to the eye doctor…the symptoms have worsened. Seems a bit quick and much to just be an astigmatism.

    My skin problems started developing around the same time my eye troubles started. I started out just getting a rash on my side. It wasn’t raised…more like a big red blotch. Didn’t itch. I didn’t pay much attention to it until I noticed over a week period it had come and gone in the same spot 3 different times. A few weeks later I started breaking out in hives. They started just on my thighs, then progressed to my entire body over time. They wouldn’t go away unless I laid down, and even then it took hours before the majority would cease. Hives became an ongoing problem that randomly popped up for about 8 months. I could never find a trigger for them. Some days I’d be working and notice them, others I’d wake up and have them…indoors, outdoors, no food allergies, no medication…stress…nothing. I could never find anything. I haven’t really had an outbreak in hives now for about 3 or 4 months. Instead I’ve been getting itchy skin (not dry skin), and more red blotches (not raised) on my skin. First they were mainly coming on my chest, then I started getting them on my hands, feet, stomach, legs…wherever. They seem to start on my chest. Sometimes they itch…sometimes they don’t.

    My symptoms all come and go…aside my eye problems. The dryness in my eyes come and go…but the rest stay pretty constant. But my digestive problems and my skin problems come and go. I have no thoughts as to what may trigger these problems.

    I know that is a lot to read, so if you’ve done so, thank you. Aside from all of that, I stay tired, I have minor body aches that come and go. Especially in my arms and in my knees. I find some days I can’t think as clearly as others…mild confusion occasionally. I have good days and just down right nasty hateful days. Dunno why. I stay depressed for weeks at a time. I went to a State Park just two days ago. It was a cold but sunny day. First time I’ve really been out in the sun that long in months. That night I noticed the butterfly rash across my nose and cheeks. Not a sun burn. It faded yesterday for a few hours and today it’s darker again. This is what made me begin thinking…could this be Lupus? and yes, it does run in both sides of my family. Lupus and Leukemia both do. I’ve had several people tell me even on good days…”You don’t look so good” My last employer told me I wasn’t working out because I just seemed too drained all the time.

    I am uninsured now, and I’m not sure how I would get tested for Lupus…or even how they test for it at all. I’ve read some websites about Lupus, it just seems like such a complicated disease. Any thoughts? Thanks again.
    I forgot to mention my miscarriages. I’ve had 4 healthy children, yet before and after my successful pregnancies, I’ve had 6 miscarriages without a reason being determined. Dunno if that has any relation to this…but thought I’d add it.

  13. Snooks M says:

    I think I could have lupus but I am not sure how to talk to my dcotor about it..?
    When I was younger I tested positive for Lupus but my pediatrician said because I didn’t have a butterfly rash, he didn’t think I had it. So he gave me athritis meds and said I had rheumatoid athritis and sent me on my way. Years later I still suffer from the joint pain in my hands, hips, back and legs. I am exausted all the time, I have been diagnosed with anemia. I have been having emense pain in my lower back but it doesnt feel like my spine. I can’t stretch it out, I feel as if I am being stabbed. I am also on meds to control night terrors, paranoia and hypopalmic Hallucinations. I have super bad dry skin that causes these red bumps all over my arms form the wrist up even to my back and my face feels like sand paper. I feel as if they are treating the symptoms but not the problem. They give me ambien to force me to sleep. I have sever headaches and even dizzy spells. When I talk to my doc, he never runs tests just tells me to buy lotion which I own tons and pills for motion sickne
    ss. I just want to feel well again. I am tired of being in Pain. I need referals to go somewhere and he doesnt’t even refer me to a specialsist to get answers

    • mgnysgtcappo says:

      You need to demand that you see a specialist. A doctor has an obligation to help you feel better. If he can’t then he needs to send you to someone who does.

      Here’s what you should do. Call and make and appointment with him. Prior to going to your appointment make a list of every symptom that you are having along with all the medications that you are taking. Have a family member come with you as an advocate. When the doctor comes into the room calmly and methodically go over the list of symptoms and medications that you are taking. Tell him that you don’t feel better and all of the medications aren’t helping. Tell him that you desire a second opinion and need a referral to a rheumatologist.

      He’ll either do one of two things. He’ll either refer you to a rheumatologist or he’ll tell you that you don’t need to see anyone else. If he gives you the referral then you’re good.

      If not then you let him know that you’ll be making an appointment on your own to see a rheumatologist for a second opinion. If they find something that he failed to test for then you will report him to the AMA for possible malpractice.

      Once you mention this he’ll give you the referral. No doctor wants to be wrong but no doctor wants to be reported to the AMA for failing to listen to a patients complaints only to have those complaints validated. I know it sounds harsh but you really need to get some answers. This will work 100% of the time.

      Having a family member or a friend in the room with you during this will also put more pressure on him/her as it’s not just your word against his/hers anymore you have a third party involved.

      The stabbing pain you feel in your back could be kidney issues. Have you had a urine test recently? I would make sure you follow up as soon as you can because if you do have Lupus and it has attacked your kidneys, time is of the essence.

      I wish you all the best!

  14. Crisen H says:

    Possible Lupus?
    Is lupus a slow progression or does it rapidly develop? I think I may have lupus. After researching, I’ve come to realize that I have several of the symptoms, some I’ve had for years and others developed recently.I’m 25 Symptoms are: Knee pains; started in my early teens,had x-rays but they showed nothing.In the past few years they’ve started giving out and tingling like they’re going to sleep. Next: migraines; started in my later teens, Dr. said they were stress related. I’m tired alot, I get the recommended 7-8 hrs of sleep most nights but I’m still tired. Then there is depression/anxiety:Started having mild anxiety attacks and mild depression in my late teens, again Dr. said it was stress. I also have been getting knots on my legs when I stand for more than 10-20 mins. The knots don’t hurt. This spring I was out in the sun and developed a rash on my exposed skin.First it felt like razor burn, then it became itchy.Never happened before. None on my face however.Normal signs of lupus?
    About the skin rash, it was definitely not a sunburn, I’ve had plenty of those. It was small red bumps. My mother has the same reaction to the sun/tanning bed but her’s is everytime she’s in the sun. Her doctor told her it was just an unexplained reaction to sun rays. Any other suggestions on what the rash could be?

    • hello says:

      Well, those are all the symptoms that I had for APS a sister of Lupus that was dismissed by doctors for years! Migraines were TIAs. Geez, I knew my vision cutting out in one eye wasn’t right.

      I suggest you see a rheumatologist and get tested for both Lupus and APS.

      I am now on Coumadin, Aspirin and Plaquenil and guess what most of my problems including the so called “depression” is gone. Listen to what your body is telling you.

      ETA following your comments: Polymorpic Light Eruptions? Sounds like it is time to see a dermatologist. But tanning beds are high in UV that set off Lupus rashes. Start taking pictures of them for your doctor. And stay out of the tanning bed.

  15. TG says:

    Do I wait or go to the Emergency room?
    I am in chronic pain with a whole lot of problems. It’s been going on for months now and I may finally have an answer..but it’s not a good one. All signs are pointing to an autoimmune disesase (mainly lupus), I have all the signs including hte facial rash. I was at the Doctor yesterday and I had a large amount of blood in my urine. Also, I woke up yesterday wth blurry vision and still have it. I can cbarely read now and everyting is blurry. My blood pressure is 145/90 ..used tobe 90/60! I have a low grade fever and just feel sick all over. Now today it is getting harder to urinate. I feel the need to go and then it takes me a while to actually go. Then I only go a little bit. Honestly, I’m SCARED! THe blood tests won’t be back til next week and I can’t get to a rheumatologist until the 24th. I feel like I’m on fire and now I seem to be losing color in my skin in places. I have whitish spots forming on my arms and a few on my legs. Can I wait this out or what should I do?

    • missylit says:

      Sounds like you are septic. Please go to the ER now. The longer you wait, the worse your condition is going to get.

  16. Kimberly F says:

    Do I have Lupus? Should I get it checked out?
    I have looked up the symptoms of this illness and while I have many of them I’m not sure if it’s worth getting checked out. I have skin rashes, not on my face usually, but on my arms and legs. I have mild to extreme fatigue even if I am only walking, and I wouldn’t consider myself out of shape, being a normally active girl. Hair loss in an even spread around my scalp is also a problem. While its not visual noticeable, I can tell my hair is nowhere near as thick as it use to be, and handfuls of hair come out for 3 or 4 days straight off and on. I often feel depressed or nervous. Generally I just feel weak, like I have no energy.

    • patricia c says:

      you sure have a lot of symptoms , first go to your Dr. get all this stuff answered so you know for sure.then you get some counseling.good luck ,and don’t look up any more symptoms or diagnoses.

  17. MaluLanix0x says:

    Does anybody know anybody with Autoimmune Hepatitis? Does it sound like I could have it?
    Last year I had Mono (Epstein Barr), and I noticed that my skin was turning yellowish and very, very itchy. Not to sound too graphic or anything, but my stools turned grey, and at other times completely white! I found out that I am a Celiac and have many, many antibodies against my thyroid (I have both Hashimotos and Graves). Its very likely that I have a mild Lupus and Sjogren’s (when I went to the doctor, she said I have a malar rash, photosensitivity, and some wierd rashes on my joints. When I went to the dentist, they had to keep the sprayer thing in my mouth the entire time!). My maternal aunt has Scleroderma and my paternal grandfather was type I diabetic. My problem right now is that I often feel VERY itchy, get wierd rashes & scalp problems, my skin turns yellowish, and lately it feels like a weight dropped in between my ribs. Once again, (not to be gross or whatever), my stools are turning lighter (and looks like nothing is being absorbed, sometimes). Recently my vitamin D levels came back low, and I had JUST been in Florida and was taking supplements. My bun creat ration was low as well. My legs, face, and stomach periodically swell up, and I feel confused and spacy often (was partially thyroid related). A year ago, my rheumatologist checked my liver enzymes & said they were fine, but I have to go back to her again! Does this sound like autoimmune hepatits though, is it hard to diagnose?

    • Linda R says:

      Go to your rheumatologist as soon as possible. Autoimmunity is not something to be fooled with or guessed about. As for your BUN, you need to have your urine checked for protein excretion and cellular casts. When autoimmune diseases are untreated, they can kill you. Stop fooling around on yahoo and get to the doctor.

  18. Laurel says:

    Symptoms for 7 months, no diagnosis. Excessive hair loss, muscle pain, swollen nodes.?
    Hello!

    I`m a 19 year old female who`s been experiencing a series of symptoms for the past 7 months that doctors have been unable to diagnose.

    Firstly, my hair has been falling out and as you can imagine, this has been very emotionally stressful. Since about 7 months ago, I`ve lost more then 75% of hair from all over my head. The hair loss is not patchy, but has been thinning all over. I used to have long, extremely thick and beautiful hair, and now its almost gone. The hair loss is not localized to my head as I’ve even noticed that the hair on my legs and in my pubic area have barely been growing back after shaving. I did see a dermatologist and he said that I must have an underlying autoiumme disease that’s causing the hair loss. He suspects lupus or a related disease, but as of yet, blood tests have shown no irregularities.

    Since around the same time my hair has been falling out, Ive noticed that the lymph nodes in my neck have been swollen. Sometimes they are red and sensitive (especially after drinking alcohol or smoking) but usually they’re painless. I’ve also been experiencing a lot of joint/muscle pain and stiffness. Some days it gets really bad and I can barely move, even typing/writing is difficult because the muscles in my hands are so stiff. I feel like every muscle and joint in my body is inflamed. I’m only 19 and I’m having as hard of a time moving around as my 55 year old mother with MS.

    Lastly, (and I’m not sure if this is related at all) my skin has been really dry and especially itchy. I’m not sure if I’ve noticed any rashes, but I have noticed some redness (light red spots) randomly on my skin.

    My family doctor did a thorough blood analysis and everything came back normal. There is no sign of vitamin deficiency, my thyriod was normal, no diabetes, my blood cell count was normal, kidney/liver function was normal, and I’m clean for STD’s/STI’s. I really don’t know where to go from here and im terrified that if I don’t find out whats wrong, I’m going to go bald.

    Does anyone know what these symptoms indicate? Any advice as to what I should get tested for/where I should go from here would be great.

    Thank you in advance for the help!

    • Moped Mama says:

      my endocrinolgist , said i had sluggish thyroid normal levels, my VIT D was dangerously low my vit b 12 was low i have hypo thyroid symptoms normal thyroid I HAVE goitors never knew it until i choked and had ENT do a nasal scope, so follow my advice my endocrinologist put me on synthyroid , 37.5 mcg works for me VIT D and VIt B 12 also AVOID wheat products you could be celiac syndrome try eatting oatmeal rice potatoes NO wheat pasta buy rice and corn pasta drink V* 8 splash change your diet

  19. MaluLanix0x says:

    Does anybody know anybody with Autoimmune Hepatitis? Does it sound like I could have it?
    Last year I had Mono (Epstein Barr), and I noticed that my skin was turning yellowish and very, very itchy. Not to sound too graphic or anything, but my stools turned grey, and at other times completely white! I found out that I am a Celiac and have many, many antibodies against my thyroid (I have both Hashimotos and Graves). My doctor just told me that it appears I am in the begining stages of Lupus and Sjogren’s. My maternal aunt has Scleroderma and my paternal grandfather was type I diabetic. My problem right now is that I often feel VERY itchy, get wierd rashes & scalp problems, my skin turns yellowish, and lately it feels like a weight dropped in between my ribs. Other times I look so pale, my mother pointed it out to me. My GI doctor told me that I have slow digestion (usually called gasteroparesis). My family and friends have been commenting on how I am randomly loosing weight, even though I feel like I eat so much (other times I just get so full so easily & feel nauseous). Once again, (not to be gross or whatever), my stools are turning lighter (and looks like nothing is being absorbed, sometimes). Recently my vitamin D levels came back low, and I had JUST been in Florida and was taking supplements. My bun creat ration was low as well. My legs, face, and stomach periodically swell up, and I feel confused and spacy often (was partially thyroid related). A year ago, my rheumatologist checked my liver enzymes. I rescently went to a new rhem & he took over 40 blood sampes & a urine sample! Does this sound like autoimmune hepatits though, is it hard to diagnose?
    after eating, I often have sqeezing pain in my back and pain in my lower sides under my back ribcage. I told my mom this & she says it sounds like a gall-bladder issue. I am NOT overweight, pregnant & not even 20 years old!

    • Jus Tme says:

      Sounds like a few things are going on. Jaundice being one of them. Jaundice occurs because of the liver not functioning properly. There could be a whole slew of issues that cause the jaundice such as hepatitis or alcoholism. I’m not saying that is what is happening to you but lets not rule anything out. Have you told your doctor everything that is going on? Write a list of every symptom and give it to your doctor. If he ignores your symptoms, inform him that you will seek medical advice elsewhere. Doctors work for YOU! Dont allow them be complacent!

  20. Mrs. Duck says:

    What could be causing such bad cold sweats?
    I thought I was simply having night terrors, possibly related to having PTSD, but now I’m wondering if something else is going on. Whereas I used to wake up once or twice a month sort of sweaty, and fearful, these cold sweats are a lot more intense. I’ve woken up every night for the last week absolutely drenched in sweat. The past few nights I’ve actually woken up at least two or three times, and I’ve actually had to change pajamas and wipe off with a towel in water, I’m literally that soaked with sweat. I’m not waking up fearful or anything either, just dizzy, cold, and drenched.

    Now it’s happening during the day! I was in class today and I started feeling freezing. Next thing I know sweat is dripping down my back, my face, my legs. I got really light headed, and felt extremely weak. I’m going to see a doctor tomorrow, but I’m just at a loss for what could be causing this! I do have an autoimmune condition as well (possibly Lupus) and I ran out of my immune suppressing medication about a week ago. Usually without it I experience an increase in fatigue, joint pain, and skin rashes. I’m on a low dose, though, so I don’t really see how these fits of freezing sweats could be related.

    Any feedback would be appreciated!

    • mom-mom says:

      It’s good to hear your seeing your doctor soon. Do you have any coughing or shortness of breath, any arm, neck, jaw or chest pain? Or anything like indigestion or abdominal pain? If you do, be sure and mention it to your doctor. Just a few things that cause night sweats – tuberculosis, cardiac irregularities, thyroid problems, and especially hormonal changes if you happen to be at that age.

      /
      If you do, be sure you mention

  21. Shelly H says:

    cutaneous lupus questions…thanks?
    I was diagnosed recently with cutaneous lupus
    I have a rash all over my back…shoulders…legs…feet
    i had it on my chest but thats seems to have improved with a cream docs perscribed

    2 days ago…they started me on prednisone and plaquenil

    how long does it normally take to notice skin clearing ????????

    • honey brown sugar says:

      well your skin is going to puff up because of the prednisone. the higher the dose, the more noticeable it is. i have lupus SLE. i refused to take the prednisone anymore. the side effects are horrible. it also causes you to go insane and have terrible mood swings. mine resulted into bipolar disorder. i still have my rash on my face all the time, but it is not as noticeable as before. it does reduce the appearance of the rash. it disappeared from my body but the redness on my face stayed and has never gone away. but my lupus is VERY aggressive. the cellcept plus the plaquenil work for me. and be aware of ALL the side effects. they do not list all the side effects on the side effects list you are given with the medicine, and usually doctors won’t tell you about them either. the worst side effects are weight gain, hallucinations, uncontrollable mood swings, increased appetite, tremors, insomnia, hot flashes, blurred vision, and hair loss. i hope your lupus improves. i have been fighting mine for 8 years. good luck

  22. princess_mons says:

    could it be fibromyalgia?
    I have had these few symptoms for years now and the doctors have not settled on a decision… my physiotherapist ask me if anyone had mentioned fibromyalgia to me and to be honest no doctor has even mentioned this disorder to me… now after reading the symptoms Im wondering if this could be my diagnosis. If you have Fibro. can you tell me if my symptoms sound familiar…. The doctors are wondering about lupus or rheum arth. for me.. but tell me I dont have enough symptoms for a diagnosis.. so they are telling me its chronic pain right now… oye.. so frustrating.

    low back pain
    cervical neck pain
    restless legs at nite
    I cant differentiate between if its joint or muscle pain I have as it interchanges… but affects my jaw, knees, ankles and wrists
    I am super tired (its goes in phases of being bad to not so bad)
    rashes to my skin on my fingers..

    thanks to all those who answer.

  23. Tattoo Steveo says:

    I’ve been feeling really sick lately and I don’t think I should be…
    Well I’m only 19 and recently I’ve been showing some crazy signs I know other kids my age don’t feel. First off I have a butterfly type rash and it peels like crazy and causes me a lot of pain. I know this isn’t rosacea theres no way it could be that bad. Another thing I notice lately is my hands turn purple in the cold and my hands are ALWAYS cold. Its 75 out right now and they were purpling. Not only that but I’ve had 4 sinus infections this year. I’m always sick now diarriah hurting skin and all. I get mosquito bites the size of tennis balls on my legs. Right now I’m going through a sinus infection and its so gross and I know its bad. I feel like something is really wrong yet my parents never really listen to me. Hell my mom even has lupus or some other auto immune disease. She tells me I think too much but the stuff is for real. I have pleurisy like crazy and pains shooting in my ribs yet no one ever says much. I have a doctors appointment but they think it is pointless. Does anyone share what i have going around me? Shouldn’t I get this checked out more than what they think?

    • sally says:

      The same thing happend to me.. I didnt even know what lupus was. I play basketball and I kept noticing that my hands were changing colors. Which I now know I have Raynauds. Along with this I get joint pain and arm weakness.. Which you may notice too. The touching of the skin sounds like Fibromyaligia but could be lupus too. My parents didnt believe my pain either they just thought I was a complainer… but now that I for sure have it they understand. My lupus started off with a cold too… Hope you find answers when you go to the doctor ! Make sure you say everything to them.. and it might not hurt to get your blood taken.. to check your ANA level.

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