Sometimes a Systemic Yeast Infection can have light symptoms, and because of this they're dismissed as nothing to concerned about. The problem is, this allows the yeast to enter the bloodstream where a lot of different problems can eventuate and can even become a life-threatening situation.

The body naturally has a certain amount of yeast that lives in the body in small quantities and actually help the body, without doing any harm to it. There are also different types of microorganisms inside the body that are there to keep the yeast in check so an infection does not occur.

On-going stress attacks, poor choices of food, normal pregnancy changes, immune system deficiency diseases, antibiotic medications and other disease may abolish the tiny microorganisms and thereby allow the Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms to rage.

The Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms can differ from each individual, but here a few of the most usual ones:

Heavy sense of exhaustion and unusual run down feelings may arise.

1. The feelings of sensory disturbances, unusual muscle aches and pains, continual headaches, constant dizziness, and complaints of the sufferering of persistent tiredness are signs of a person with Systemic Yeast Infection.

2. Unusual or sudden sensitivity to chemicals or new food allergies.
Arising troubles which haven't occurred before with several chemicals or foods are common with those suffering from Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms.

3. Problems with the gastrointestinal tract.

On many occasions, as touched on in the previous detail of the food allergies, flatulence, inflammatory bowel disease, rectal itching, constipation, and diarrhea are the most common of the Symptoms.

It is even possible for thrush, a Yeast Infection affecting the mouth and/or throat, to develop.

4. Onset of urinary and genital problems.

5. Development of hives and skin rashes.

You could even be having a case of hives, and not know where they came from.

6. Suddenly feeling irritable or mildly depressed.

Many times people complain of Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms that include: mental confusion, feeling of being in a 'fog', difficulty focusing or concentrating, sleepness nights, memory loss, and decreased attention span.

7. Problems with the autoimmune system.

Some autoimmune disorders that normally become worse from a Systemic Yeast Infection are sarcoidosis, scleroderma, myasthenia gravis, arthritis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Yeast flourish on a body that is fed with sugar, refined starch, and chemical additives.
These chemicals, starches and sugars are also readily present in bread, cookies, chips and other junk foods which are a large part of many peoples diets.

When someone is under immense stress, the microorganisms in the body that control the yeast start to die off.

Anytime you think you may have a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms, you need to check with your doctor about what tests need to be run to determine what your body's level of Yeast organism is.
All in all, remember that it's vital to know if you are dealing with a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms so you can get the proper treatment.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/women-health-articles/systemic-yeast-infection-symptoms-7-signs-watch-out-464763.html


lupus systemic treatment

10 thoughts on “Lupus Systemic Treatment

  1. sekhmet179

    What are the four stages of treatment for lupus?
    I remember reading somewhere that there were four stages of treatment for systemic lupus erythematosus I think it was like
    I-corticosteroids
    II-?
    III-?
    IV-Immunosuppressors, chemotherapy, etc

    I was wondering if there was anything like this on the internet or whether I am confusing it with the kidney affected stages? (I doubt it but you never know…)

    Thanks in advance for any info, and please be sure to set up a link to where you got your info

    1. Cheryl M

      What is the treatment for systemic lupus?

      There is no permanent cure for SLE. The goal of treatment is to relieve symptoms and protect organs by decreasing inflammation and/or the level of autoimmune activity in the body. Many patients with mild symptoms may need no treatment or only intermittent courses of antiinflammatory medications. Those with more serious illness involving damage to internal organ(s) may require high doses of corticosteroids in combination with other medications that suppress the body’s immune system.

      Patients with SLE need more rest during periods of active disease. Researchers have reported that poor sleep quality was a significant factor in developing fatigue in patients with SLE. These reports emphasize the importance for patients and physicians to address sleep quality and the effect of underlying depression, lack of exercise, and self-care coping strategies on overall health. During these periods, carefully prescribed exercise is still important to maintain muscle tone and range of motion in the joints.

      Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are helpful in reducing inflammation and pain in muscles, joints, and other tissues. Examples of NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen (Motrin), naproxen (Naprosyn), and sulindac (Clinoril). Since the individual response to NSAIDs varies among patients, it is common for a doctor to try different NSAIDs to find the most effective one with the fewest side effects. The most common side effects are stomach upset, abdominal pain, ulcers, and even ulcer bleeding. NSAIDs are usually taken with food to reduce side effects. Sometimes, medications that prevent ulcers while taking NSAIDs, such as misoprostol (Cytotec), are given simultaneously.

      Corticosteroids are more potent than NSAIDs in reducing inflammation and restoring function when the disease is active. Corticosteroids are particularly helpful when internal organs are involved. Corticosteroids can be given by mouth, injected directly into the joints and other tissues, or administered intravenously. Unfortunately, corticosteroids have serious side effects when given in high doses over prolonged periods, and the doctor will try to monitor the activity of the disease in order to use the lowest doses that are safe. Side effects of corticosteroids include weight gain, thinning of the bones and skin, infection, diabetes, facial puffiness, cataracts, and death (necrosis) of large joints.

      Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) is an antimalarial medication found to be particularly effective for SLE patients with fatigue, skin, and joint disease. Side effects include diarrhea, upset stomach, and eye pigment changes. Eye pigment changes are rare, but require monitoring by an ophthalmologist (eye specialist) during treatment with Plaquenil. Researchers have found that Plaquenil significantly decreased the frequency of abnormal blood clots in patients with systemic SLE. Moreover, the effect seemed independent of immune suppression, implying that Plaquenil can directly act to prevent the blood clots. This fascinating work highlights an important reason for patients and doctors to consider Plaquenil, especially for those SLE patients who are at some risk for blood clots in veins and arteries, such as those with phospholipid antibodies (cardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant, and false positive VDRL). This means not only that Plaquenil reduces the chance for reflares of SLE, but it can also be beneficial in ‘thinning’ the blood to prevent abnormal excessive blood clotting.

      For resistant skin disease, other antimalarial drugs, such as chloroquine (Aralen) or quinacrine, are considered, and can be used in combination with hydroxychloroquine. Alternative medications for skin disease include dapsone and retinoic acid (Retin-A). Retin-A is often effective for an uncommon wart-like form of lupus skin disease. For more severe skin disease, immunosuppressive medications are considered as below.

      Medications that suppress immunity (immunosuppressive medications) are also called cytotoxic drugs. Immunosuppressive medications are used for treating patients with more severe manifestations of SLE with damage to internal organ(s). Examples of immunosuppressive medications include methotrexate (Rheumatrex, Trexall), azathioprine (Imuran), cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan), chlorambucil (Leukeran), and cyclosporine (Sandimmune). All immunosuppressive medications can seriously depress blood cell counts and increase risks of infection and bleeding. Other side effects are peculiar for each drug. For examples, Rheumatrex can cause liver toxicity, while Sandimmune can impair kidney function.

      In recent years, mycophenolate mofetil (Cellcept) has been used as an effective medication for lupus, particularly when it associated with kidney disease. Cellcept has been helpful in reversing active lupus kidney disease (lupus renal disease) and in maintaining remission after it is established. It’s lower side effect profile has advantage over traditional immune suppression medications.

      In SLE patients with serious brain or kidney disease, plasmapheresis is sometimes used to remove antibodies and other immune substances from the blood to suppress immunity. Some SLE patients can develop seriously low platelet levels, thereby increasing the risk of excessive and spontaneous bleeding. Since the spleen is believed to be the major site of platelet destruction, surgical removal of the spleen is sometimes performed to improve platelet levels. Other treatments have included plasmapheresis and the use of male hormones. Plasmapheresis has also been used to remove proteins (cryoglobulins) that can lead to vasculitis. Endstage kidney damage from SLE requires dialysis and/or a kidney transplant.

      Most recent research is indicating benefits of rituximab (Rituxan) in treating lupus. Rituximab is an intravenously infused antibody that suppresses a particular white blood cell, the B cell, by decreasing their number in the circulation. B cells have been found to play a central role in lupus activity, and when they are suppressed, the disease tends toward remission.

      At the 2007 national Rheumatology meeting, there was a paper presented suggesting that low dose dietary supplementation with omega-3 fish oils could help patients with lupus by decreasing disease activity and possibly decreasing heart disease risk.

  2. Anonymous

    Do you still recieve Medical Benefits if you recieve a hardship discharge from the Army?
    I have severe systemic lupus erythematosus and it has put a huge hardship on my family. I have been getting treated for it but its getting really bad, so bad I have to be on Chemotherapy. We heard that my husband could possibly get discharged out of the army on a hardship discharge. Our only concern is that my treatment costs a lot and we’re not sure if we will still receive the medical coverage if he is discharged. Can anyone help???

  3. kennie

    Is there any natural herbs that I can take to control my Lupus? Also to get rid of discoid Lupus naturally?
    Is their a way that I can naturally control my lupus with out taking a great deal of medication. Also I have discoid lupus on my face, can something like shea butter help

    1. Linda R

      No. It is not normal for your immune system to attack you. That’s what happens in lupus.

      Lupus symptoms, whether in the skin or the body, are controlled when the overactive and confused immune system is suppressed. Shea butter moisturizes. Period.

      You have a choice. You can run around looking for the magic “natural” bullet or you can bite the bullet and work with your doctors.

      By the way, hemlock and arsenic are quite natural, but they can kill you. I have systemic lupus. Early on, I was sure there was some “natural cure” out there.

      I take very few meds now, despite the fact that I had severe organ involvement (heart, lungs, bone marrow, kidneys). I am 98% vegetarian, severely limit processed foods, do not eat fast foods or junk foods, exercise daily, practice yoga and meditation AND follow the treatment regimen that my doctor and I have worked out.

  4. Unknown

    What are some of the medical treatments for lupus? How do people die from lupus do their organs sweal in?
    the body how does it happen and what are some of the treatments for lupus?

  5. Sanjay K

    Do Homeopathy has proper medicine for SLE or any other Alternatives mediums other than Allopathy?
    Is HomeoPathy treats SLE Disease stright away. If it has what is the treatment? Is it proven and if it is proven what is the proff? Is there any alternative medicines other than Allopathy for this treatment. Here SLE Refers: Systemic lupus erythematosus disease

  6. JENNIFER

    Why would my doctor order a Lupus Profile with no family history of Lupus?
    My doctor has used diagnosis codes for Neuritis and Vertigo, and ordered a Lupus Profile and ANA w/ Reflex.

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