Glandular fever (or kissing disease) is the common term used to describe an acute viral infection called infectious mononucleosis. The virus that causes glandular fever is known as Epstein-Barr virus. Glandular fever mainly affects young adults. A chronic form of glandular fever is one of the suggested causes of chronic fatigue syndrome.

The most common age to get glandular fever with symptoms is between the ages of 10 and 35. Only people who haven’t already had it as a child can get glandular fever as an older child or young adult. If you’ve already had it, your body has produced antibodies that fight the virus if you come into contact with it again. Its very rare to get glandular fever twice.

The cause of glandular fever (infectious mononucleosis) is a virus known as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). This is most frequently seen in teenagers and young adults. It is thought to spread in a similar way to many other viruses, from saliva, and is sometimes jokingly referred to as the “kissing disease”, as it is often passed from boyfriend to girlfriend or vice versa. Glandular Fever is caused by the Epstein-Barr virus. It can be spread by coughing and sneezing or by sharing eating and drinking utensils.

Once you have recovered from glandular fever, it’s unlikely that you will get it again as you develop immunity to the infection. The virus will still be in your body but, like other herpes viruses, EBV can live in your body without causing any illness. Most adults carry antibodies to EBV in their blood – this shows that they have been infected at some time.

The disease is transmitted in saliva (also called the kissing disease) and by aerosol. Some young adults may remain debilitated and depressed for some months after infection. However, reactivation of latent virus is only thought to occur in immunocompromised patients such as AIDS patients. EBV is the cause of oral hairy leucoplakia, Burkitt’s lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, post-transplant lymphoma and immunoblastic lymphoma in AIDS patients.

Symptoms of Glandular Fever

At first, glandular fever is sometimes wrongly diagnosed, for example as a bacterial throat infection or tonsillitis. If you are given treatment for a bacterial infection with the antibiotics ampicillin or amoxycillin, you may develop a rash of small red spots.

Infection begins in the salivary glands, which release large amounts of the virus into the saliva. The infection spreads to the B lymphocytes, causing them to multiply, and causing the lymph glands to swell and become painful.

Symptoms of the disease include fever, a sore throat, and swollen lymph glands.

The spleen, which is part of the immune system, may swell up noticeably and become painful. This organ is found under the ribs on the left side of your abdomen. If it is hit or damaged while tender and swollen it can sometimes rupture (burst) and cause internal bleeding, requiring surgery.

Young adults are often affected and the severity and duration of symptoms varies from no symptoms, to developing breathing difficulties (because of swelling at the back of the throat) and other complications requiring hospitalisation. Symptoms can last for months (it is a risk factor for chronic fatigue syndrome). Symptom relief and rest are commonly recommended treatments.

Glandular fever is common in children and teenagers in developed countries such as Australia. It is sometimes called ‘The Kissing Disease’, because the virus that causes it is found in saliva, and is passed on by close contact such as kissing (and teenagers are prone to kissing). The medical name for glandular fever is Infectious Mononucleosis.


10 thoughts on “Symptoms Of Lupus Erythematosus Rash

  1. Song_bird

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus or Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    My symptoms are: Extremely painful to walk, rashes, blood in urine, Anemia (had to get iron infusions), headaches, extreme fatigue, ect. I seen a doctor who did some x-rays, blood work & a physical exam. She recently called me & told me from my lab results came back & said i have either Systemic Lupus Erythematosus or Rheumatoid Arthritis. She said my blood work showed alot of abnormalities & even infection. She wanted me to start on a steroid right away. She put me on (10 mg pills of Prednisone) for 10 days until my follow up with a Rheumatologist. Okay my question: What is Lupus & Rheumatoid Arthritis?
    Are these 2 illnesses simular? She will be calling me back within 5 days with the other test results. Has anyone personally experienced this? She said my illness is treatable but not cureable. I’m still pretty young & this is a shock to me & i’m having a hard time dealing with not knowing what i’m dealing with i guess my new doctor will be able to answer alot of questions later.
    Thanks for the advice i will go look there.

  2. sunshine_punk

    is this story of mine at all good?! :D?
    Intro.
    I never really had it all you could say. Most kids worried about wearing their brand named clothes, having amazing cars, and having the perfect boyfriend/girlfriend. Personally all i worried about something much bigger. All I want to do is live.
    My life was going great until i hit 14. My parents were constantly fighting, for reason i still don’t know. They were at each other throats. So much, I thought eventually the neighbors would call the police. I had to be like a mom to my sister Lilly, 12 (who was also my best friend), even though she was only 2 years younger then me, since my mom would blame us for all the arguing.
    One morning after 2 agonizing years of hell my dad walked out on us. My mother became depressed. She saw a shrink 2 times a week and hardly got out of bed. and that put an enormous amount of pressure on me.. More then was already set on me. The pain of my dad leaving was pretty awful. After he left, a new burden began to show its ugly face.
    Oh i guess i never really introduced myself properly. My name is Kailey. I’m now 16 years old, and im dying.

    Chapter 1

    “Breathe in and out deeply,” the nurse Sally said as she held a cold stethoscope to my chest. I did as I was told and answered a text message from Mona at the same time.

    “Come over tonight? My mom’s out, and we can cook something strange! bring Lilly along!” -Mona.

    “Yeah sounds great! I have to ask my mom first of course. But you know her. So I will probably be there. What time?” I replied quickly, and put away my phone as the doctor walked in.

    “Hello, Kailey. How are you today?” Dr. Highman asked.
    “Same old. Same old. I havent been having as much axiety attacks lately.” I said checking my phone seeing if the was a new text yet.
    “So, the pills are working then huh?”
    “Yup,” i hiccuped. “Excuse me, but its not a thrill having to add another pill to my daily million of them.” i said sarcastically.
    “I understand, but having Lupus, is a differicult disease to control.” He said while writing something down on his clipboard.
    Lupus is the common name for systemic lupus erythematosus, also called SLE. Common symptoms include feeling very tired and having joint pain or swelling (arthritis), a fever, and a skin rash. Over time, some people with lupus have problems with the heart, lungs, kidneys, blood cells, or nervous system. I have it really bad in my nervous system, my joints, and my lungs and heart. Not to mention, my shortness in breath and how im tired often, and get feverish every once and a while. I guess having it since i was 4 has something to do with all the symtoms.
    I nodded my head in agreement.
    “So hows your mother doing? I noticed she isnt here,” he looked up at the empty chair next to the examination table, “again,” then at me.
    I looked away from his gaze and answered, “Well she doing fine i guess, still doesnt get out much. but im making sue she eats properly and takesher meds. Don;t worry about it doc.” I smiled and looked up at him again.
    “Well that good. dont forget, her appointment is…”
    I cut him off, “Next week on tuesday, I know. I know.” I rolled my eyes, upset that i was 16 already and now had to drive her everywhere.
    He nodded, “Ok. Well, miss. Kailey, you seem to be just fine, just keep up everything your doing. and here are your medication refills.” He scribbled on a peice of paper and handed it to me.
    I looked at it and just slowly nodded.
    “See you next time.” He walked out of the room.
    I sat in the room for a while. I felt my pocket vibrate and took out my phone.

    “hmm, around 5? you guys can spend the night too, if you want.” -Mona.

    “Yeah ok sounds good. just got out of the doctors right now. heading home.” Send.

    I got off the table and walked out of the room. I was heading out the doctores office, but then turned into the restroom. i set my phone on the sink and unzipped my pants and sat down. i didnt even have to go. My eyes felt droopy. I got back up and zipped my pants back up, put my phone in my pocket and turnined on the sink. I washed my hands then rinsed my face. I looked at myself in the mirror for a while. My auburn hair next to my ears were wet from wetting my face. My hazel eyes were bloodshot from my lack of sleep last night. I rinsed my face once more, dried it off and walked out of the restroom.
    I opened the door to my old beat up mustang, and sat down.

    “Oh? how’d it go?” -Mona.

    “Ya know.. The same.” Send.

    “Nothing wrong?” -Mona.

    “Nope everythings A-OK. Well for me anyway. haha” Send.

    “Thats good. =] Are you nervous about starting junior year?” -Mona.

    I started the car and pulled out. I drove just down the road then stopped at a gas station for some snacks.
    I walked in the door and swear everyone stopped and looked at me. But I’m probably just paranoid. i walked around and grabbed a bag of hot fries, a 2 liter coke, a bag of chocolates, and some macrowaveable ravioli’s. Yum, what a lunch.
    I paid

  3. Act4Love

    Should I get tested for Lupus?
    Hi, I’m 16 years old. I’ve been suffering from bumps and redness on my face (cheeks, mostly), and it’s been something which I cannot get rid of. I thought it was just acne. My mom, however, is currently studying to be a nurse, and in her textbook she stumbled upon a picture of the butterfly rash often associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (known as Lupus/SLE). I didn’t think much of it, until my mom and I researched the symptoms.
    These are the symptoms I’m currently experiencing:
    *Rash?
    *Extreme fatigue
    *Depression
    *Joint pain (mostly in my knees and ankles)
    *Migraine-like headaches almost every day for the past month
    *Difficulty concentrating
    *Psychosis
    *Inflamation of organs-last year I was diagnosed with gastreoenteritis.
    *Also, about a week and a half ago my back (around the kidney area) started hurting
    *I thought it was my period, but I have dried up blood that comes out everytime I wipe after urinating.
    *I have virtually no appetite.
    *My vision has been blurred the past few days.
    *The “flares” started about 2 weeks after the fatigue.

    What do you think about it?
    Thank you in advance.

    P.S- The symptoms listed started before I found out about the disease…less chance of psychosomatic diagnosis 🙂

    1. FirstStar

      Yes, you should probably get tested!

      Lupus is an Autoimmune disease, which is caused by both genetic and environmental factors, so, if you have a family history of auto immune diseases (Such as Crohns Disease, Scleroderma, Rheumatoid Arthritis ect…) You are at an increased risk, also if you are female and between 15 to 45.

      It takes awhile to diagnose Lupus, but your doctor will (most likely) refer you to an Internal Medicine Doctor, or may order the test themselves (Blood test! Urine test!) And depending on what the doctor thinks, the blood test will include an ANA (Antinuclear Antibody) test (Very important test!!! if this comes out positive, it could mean Lupus, or another auto-immune disorder!!!)

      Some other blood tests may also include tests for Hep. C, and Hep D, along with a Creatinine test, Bilrubin and Albumin test (Too much to type- Google it!) and ALT test (To see how epic your liver is doing!)

      So YES. Get tested; because like I said, it takes awhile to diagnose because the symptoms mimic so many other diseases; it could take months.

      Good Luck! 🙂

      I’m 17 and had Lupus symptoms too; test results come back in January (Next month!) Hope 4 the best!

  4. Dance-a-Holic

    I need help editing my research paper. I’m really bad at papers…..please help!?
    Well, its on lupus. I have the intro and two body paragraphs, and I still need to do the conclusion. So, I was wondering what I should change on my paper, and what I need to add..? I also have to do a powerpoint based on the paper, that should last a minimum of 5 minutes up to 15.

    The reason why I chose this topic was because my dad has lupus, and I wanted to know more about the topic. He was diagnosed with lupus when he was about fourteen years old. He still receives treatment for it by going in for blood tests and taking medication He has the most common form of lupus, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), in which causes the antibodies to react against his own normal tissue. He has arthritis and joint problems, but nothings wrong with his internal organs. To support my dad and other lupus survivors, my family and I all go to the lupus walk in honor of remembering the people who had lupus that died. The things the audience can expect to read in this paper are the different types of lupus, the symptoms, the treatment and cures.
    Lupus is the result of an unbalanced immune system that can be destructive to any organ in the body. It can be categorized into three groups: discoid lupus Erythematosus, systemic lupus Erythematosus, and drug-induced systemic lupus Erythematosus. DLE is always limited to the skin and is identified by a rash that may appear on the face, neck, and scalp. It can evolve into the systemic form, which can affect any organ or system of the body. Systemic lupus Erythematosus is more severe than discoid lupus and can affect almost any organ or organ system of the body. No two people with SLE will have identical symptoms. Drug-induced systemic Lupus Erythematosus occurs after the use of certain prescribed drugs. It is more common in men, because the drugs are given to them more often.
    Lupus is hard to diagnose because it has a wide range of symptoms involving various parts of the body; and symptoms differ from each person. Most people develop painful joints and a rash, but lupus may also cause fatigue, depressions, and kidney problems. The treatment of lupus varies from person to person because each person has different symptoms. Most people with SLE require a regular blood test to check for lupus flares. Medication is the primary medical treatment for lupus. Presently, there are no other methods available to treat lupus because there is nothing else that can have the necessary impact on the immune system. Currently, there is no cure for lupus, but with early diagnosis and proper medical treatment it can significantly help control the disease.

    thanks. it would be much appreciated!!!!

  5. Mandy Cakes

    This is a lot to ask, I know. But if someone could review my APA paper I would GREATLY appreciate it. ?
    I think my greatest problem is with grammer errors and my in-text citations. Also, all of those citations that repeat themselves look funny to me. They can’t be right? Can they? I’m also confused with secondary citations. I think they’re a no no but I can’t get a clear answer on what they are. Here’s the paper. Please kindly review if you’d like. I’d love yah for it.

    Kisses
    Mandi

    (Title page not included)

    Introduction
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that permits the affected body to build antibodies to attack its own cells as if they were foreign. There are three main types of lupus. They are discoid, drug induced, and Systemic lupus erythematosus (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Doctors must be careful in diagnosing lupus since it can easily be confused with other diseases (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Lupus is capable of attacking any part of the body but for the most part it mainly affects the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The cause of Lupus is currently unknown. Lupus truly is a sickness of mystery since the cause and cure have currently been unidentified. However, there are known genetic (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) and environmental (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008) aspects that have been known to trigger this illness. On an inspiring note, there is presently a study being conducted with mice in search for the cure of lupus.

    Discussion
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that is known to be a chronic (continuous or reoccurring) inflammatory illness that has the ability to attack any region of the body (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The symptoms of the disease are painful or swollen joints and muscle pain, unexplained fever, red rashes, chest pain when breathing deeply, loss of hair, pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress (also known as Raynaud’s phenomenon), sensitivity to the sun swelling in legs or around eyes, mouth ulcers, swollen glands and extreme fatigue (WebMD, 2008). Those that suffer from lupus may never have the same symptoms as another person with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). However, the most common areas of the body affected are the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).. Also in most cases in order for a doctor to diagnose lupus the patient must illustrate at least four (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) of the listed symptoms.
    The actual cause of the disease is unknown. However, there are genetic and environmental characteristics that could trigger lupus to develop. Many patients that suffer from lupus have a genetic association with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Lupus could be the result of mutated genes of interferon and the genes that play vital roles in regulating the immune response (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). If a patient has a genetic link to lupus there are also environmental aspects that could trigger lupus. They are infection, ultraviolet light, certain drugs like; procainamide, hydralazine, and quinidine (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008), and extreme stress (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Factors that potentially contribute to the progression of lupus are interleukins and interferons (immune molecules). Interleukins and interferons have been shown to control the autoantibody release in response to certain bodily stimuli (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).
    Lupus commonly affects women, African Americans, and Asians more than any other group (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Since 90% of all patients with lupus are female, women between the ages of 15-50 should be tested for lupus if they portray at least one of the symptoms (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Also, there is an increased risk of lupus in people who already have the Epstein-Barr virus. (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008)
    The healthy immune system’s mission is to protect the body from infections and foreign objects within the body. When the immune system is working properly it will recognize the foreign bacteria, virus, or objects as non-self. Upon recognition that something does not belong, it will build antibodies against the unwanted agent, attack and destroy it (Marieb, 2009, p. 408 & 410). However, the activities of the immune system are much different when the body is affected with lupus. Instead of the body producing antibodies against foreign bacterial that do not belong, the immune system will produce an autoantibody that attacks the body’s own cells and tissues. The reason for this is because they can not recognize their own cells or tissue as self. When an autoantibody attack occurs, the autoantibodies will attach themselves to various tissues and cells (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). When this happens the body’s inflammatory response occurs. The same thing happens when we have been hurt and the tissue has truly been damaged.
    There are a few different ways Lupus can affect the body, for example in nearly all individuals that suffer from lup

    1. mgunnycappo

      It’s a pretty good paper but in the beginning you made an error. There are four types of Lupus. Neo Natal (babies), Drug Induced, Discoid and Systemic. Then after that you should state that your paper is talking about Systemic Lupus because they symptoms you go on to describe are those of Systemic Lupus. Your citings follow the APA guidelines. I couldn’t see the entire paper as it got cut off. Also couldn’t see your works cited page. You don’t show any quotation marks so I’m assuming that you didn’t plagerize any of the information directly from the material.

  6. Mandy Cakes

    This is a lot to ask, I know. But if someone could review my APA paper I would GREATLY appreciate it. ?
    I think my greatest problem is with grammer errors and my in-text citations. Also, all of those citations that repeat themselves look funny to me. They can’t be right? Can they? I’m also confused with secondary citations. I think they’re a no no but I can’t get a clear answer on what they are. Here’s the paper. Please kindly review if you’d like. I’d love yah for it.

    Kisses
    Mandi

    (Title page & reference page not included)

    Introduction
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that permits the affected body to build antibodies to attack its own cells as if they were foreign. There are three main types of lupus. They are discoid, drug induced, and Systemic lupus erythematosus (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Doctors must be careful in diagnosing lupus since it can easily be confused with other diseases (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Lupus is capable of attacking any part of the body but for the most part it mainly affects the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The cause of Lupus is currently unknown. Lupus truly is a sickness of mystery since the cause and cure have currently been unidentified. However, there are known genetic (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) and environmental (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008) aspects that have been known to trigger this illness. On an inspiring note, there is presently a study being conducted with mice in search for the cure of lupus.

    Discussion
    Lupus is an autoimmune disease that is known to be a chronic (continuous or reoccurring) inflammatory illness that has the ability to attack any region of the body (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). The symptoms of the disease are painful or swollen joints and muscle pain, unexplained fever, red rashes, chest pain when breathing deeply, loss of hair, pale or purple fingers or toes from cold or stress (also known as Raynaud’s phenomenon), sensitivity to the sun swelling in legs or around eyes, mouth ulcers, swollen glands and extreme fatigue (WebMD, 2008). Those that suffer from lupus may never have the same symptoms as another person with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). However, the most common areas of the body affected are the skin, kidneys, joints, heart, gastrointestinal tract, and serous membranes (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).. Also in most cases in order for a doctor to diagnose lupus the patient must illustrate at least four (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009) of the listed symptoms.
    The actual cause of the disease is unknown. However, there are genetic and environmental characteristics that could trigger lupus to develop. Many patients that suffer from lupus have a genetic association with the disease (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Lupus could be the result of mutated genes of interferon and the genes that play vital roles in regulating the immune response (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). If a patient has a genetic link to lupus there are also environmental aspects that could trigger lupus. They are infection, ultraviolet light, certain drugs like; procainamide, hydralazine, and quinidine (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008), and extreme stress (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009). Factors that potentially contribute to the progression of lupus are interleukins and interferons (immune molecules). Interleukins and interferons have been shown to control the autoantibody release in response to certain bodily stimuli (Encyclopedia Britannica, 2009).
    Lupus commonly affects women, African Americans, and Asians more than any other group (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Since 90% of all patients with lupus are female, women between the ages of 15-50 should be tested for lupus if they portray at least one of the symptoms (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). Also, there is an increased risk of lupus in people who already have the Epstein-Barr virus. (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008)
    The healthy immune system’s mission is to protect the body from infections and foreign objects within the body. When the immune system is working properly it will recognize the foreign bacteria, virus, or objects as non-self. Upon recognition that something does not belong, it will build antibodies against the unwanted agent, attack and destroy it (Marieb, 2009, p. 408 & 410). However, the activities of the immune system are much different when the body is affected with lupus. Instead of the body producing antibodies against foreign bacterial that do not belong, the immune system will produce an autoantibody that attacks the body’s own cells and tissues. The reason for this is because they can not recognize their own cells or tissue as self. When an autoantibody attack occurs, the autoantibodies will attach themselves to various tissues and cells (Rahman & Isenberg, 2008). When this happens the body’s inflammatory response occurs. The same thing happens when we have been hurt and the tissue has truly been damaged.
    There are a few different ways Lupus can affect the body, for example in nearly all individuals tha

    1. slawekp2001

      Get rid of all the citations that are repeating themselves,that a big no no.Use each citation only once ok.I think alround its great and you should get a good grade.Hope it helps

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