Sometimes a Systemic Yeast Infection can have light symptoms, and because of this they're dismissed as nothing to concerned about. The problem is, this allows the yeast to enter the bloodstream where a lot of different problems can eventuate and can even become a life-threatening situation.

The body naturally has a certain amount of yeast that lives in the body in small quantities and actually help the body, without doing any harm to it. There are also different types of microorganisms inside the body that are there to keep the yeast in check so an infection does not occur.

On-going stress attacks, poor choices of food, normal pregnancy changes, immune system deficiency diseases, antibiotic medications and other disease may abolish the tiny microorganisms and thereby allow the Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms to rage.

The Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms can differ from each individual, but here a few of the most usual ones:

Heavy sense of exhaustion and unusual run down feelings may arise.

1. The feelings of sensory disturbances, unusual muscle aches and pains, continual headaches, constant dizziness, and complaints of the sufferering of persistent tiredness are signs of a person with Systemic Yeast Infection.

2. Unusual or sudden sensitivity to chemicals or new food allergies.
Arising troubles which haven't occurred before with several chemicals or foods are common with those suffering from Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms.

3. Problems with the gastrointestinal tract.

On many occasions, as touched on in the previous detail of the food allergies, flatulence, inflammatory bowel disease, rectal itching, constipation, and diarrhea are the most common of the Symptoms.

It is even possible for thrush, a Yeast Infection affecting the mouth and/or throat, to develop.

4. Onset of urinary and genital problems.

5. Development of hives and skin rashes.

You could even be having a case of hives, and not know where they came from.

6. Suddenly feeling irritable or mildly depressed.

Many times people complain of Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms that include: mental confusion, feeling of being in a 'fog', difficulty focusing or concentrating, sleepness nights, memory loss, and decreased attention span.

7. Problems with the autoimmune system.

Some autoimmune disorders that normally become worse from a Systemic Yeast Infection are sarcoidosis, scleroderma, myasthenia gravis, arthritis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Yeast flourish on a body that is fed with sugar, refined starch, and chemical additives.
These chemicals, starches and sugars are also readily present in bread, cookies, chips and other junk foods which are a large part of many peoples diets.

When someone is under immense stress, the microorganisms in the body that control the yeast start to die off.

Anytime you think you may have a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms, you need to check with your doctor about what tests need to be run to determine what your body's level of Yeast organism is.
All in all, remember that it's vital to know if you are dealing with a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms so you can get the proper treatment.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/women-health-articles/systemic-yeast-infection-symptoms-7-signs-watch-out-464763.html


systemic lupus erythematous

38 thoughts on “Systemic Lupus Erythematous

  1. Alannah

    is my mother’s age the cause of my medical conditions?
    Hi everyone,

    My Mother was 37 when I was born, as was my father. I have a collection of medical conditions, and am wondering if any of them could have been caused by my Mother’s advanced maternal age (35+).

    My conditions are as follows:

    – Systemic Lupus Erythematous. My Maternal Grandmother also had Lupus and passed away from Lupus complications.

    – Arnold Chiari Malformation I. I’ve had symptoms of this my whole life, and it was only diagnosed a couple of years. I had to undergo surgery.

    – Tremor. My Mother and Maternal Grandfather also have this.

    – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This was also recently diagnosed.

    – Cerebellar Ataxia. I’m not too sure about this one. I was diagnosed with this as a toddler due to developmental delays, but I think this may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along.

    – Panic disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. My Mother had some anxiety issues when she was in her 20s and my brother (who is 7 years older) was recently diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common, I suppose.

    – Non-verbal Learning Disorder. Not sure about this one either – it may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along too.

    I think that’s everything!

    So, my question is, do you believe my mother’s age had anything to do with any of my medical conditions? If so, which ones, and why?

    Please don’t answer if you’re not sure, I’d like answers from people who are *relatively* certain.

    Thank you!!

    1. SethSpeaks

      No. Your mother did not have advanced maternal age. My mother was 37 when I was born BTW. These days, women are giving birth with no problems into their 40s. The tendency towards anxiety is hereditary, but it can be overcome. AC malformation also hereditary. Has nothing to do with mother’s age. Especially as she was not at all into the age range where real complications begin.

  2. Alannah

    Which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at birth of child) cause?
    Hi everyone,

    To the best of your knowledge, which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at the birth of the child):

    – Learning disabilities/disorders

    – Anxiety disorders

    – Malformations (such as Arnold Chiari Malformation type I)

    – Systemic lupus erythematous

    – Female endocrine disorders

    If they can, and if you know why, can you please explain?

    Thank you!

    1. LEW

      I have never heard maternal age being an issue with anxiety disorders. Not sure what Endocrine disorders are. Any woman of any age can have serious issues and complications during pregnancy the older mom has a higher percentage of such issues. Its been said it because of the age of the eggs a older mother has.

  3. Alannah

    Is my mother’s age the cause of my medical conditions?
    Hi everyone,

    My Mother was 37 when I was born, as was my mother. I have a collection of medical conditions, and am wondering if any of them could have been caused by my Mother’s advanced maternal age (35+).

    My conditions are as follows:

    – Systemic Lupus Erythematous. My Maternal Grandmother also had Lupus and passed away from Lupus complications.

    – Arnold Chiari Malformation I. I’ve had symptoms of this my whole life, and it was only diagnosed a couple of years. I had to undergo surgery.

    – Tremor. My Mother and Maternal Grandfather also have this.

    – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This was also recently diagnosed.

    – Cerebellar Ataxia. I’m not too sure about this one. I was diagnosed with this as a toddler due to developmental delays, but I think this may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along.

    – Panic disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. My Mother had some anxiety issues when she was in her 20s and my brother (who is 7 years older) was recently diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common, I suppose.

    – Non-verbal Learning Disorder. Not sure about this one either – it may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along too.

    I think that’s everything!

    So, my question is, do you believe my mother’s age had anything to do with any of my medical conditions? If so, which ones, and why?

    Please don’t answer if you’re not sure, I’d like answers from people who are *relatively* certain.

    Thank you!!

    1. derfini

      No, not at all. Some of the conditions you describe are congenital and seem to run in your family, and it is important to tell medical people about your family history when you are being treated. Some are just you. My mother was 42 when I was born, and there was a woman of 49 in the same ward giving birth to her umpteenth baby. An anxious mother might raise an anxious child, but it is not inevitable. People’s social circumstances are just as likely to affect emotional issues.

  4. Zaggie

    Anyone understand anatomy?
    1. Systemic lupus erythematous (often simply called lupus) is a condition that sometimes affects young women. It is a chronic (persistent) inflammation that affects all or most of the connective tissue proper in the body. Suzy is told by her doctor that she has lupus, and she asks if it will have widespread or merely localized effects within the body. What should her physician answer?

    2. Mrs. Lindsey sees her gynecologist because she is unable to become pregnant. The doctor discovers granulation tissue in her vaginal canal and explains that sperm are susceptible to some of the same chemicals as bacteria. What is inhibiting the sperm?

    Please help!!

    1. Eve

      1 – systemic means it affects the whole body. the effects will be widespread (muscoloskeletal, cardiac, dermathologic, hemathologic…)

      2- it probably is an actinomycosis, but i do not know what molecule exactly is inhibiting the sperm

  5. niggyniggy

    ok this question is for someone who knows alot about pharmaceuticals?
    i was wondering if the medicine Propranolol is similar to any benzodiazepines, such as klonopin, xanax, or attivan. its a round green pill with a 40 on the back and MYLAN 184 (or 784 i cant really tell)

    like, i wanna know if they have similar side effects. and if your gunna b a dick dont answer my question. thanks

    1. Vitki

      Propranolol is an antiaxiety medication. the following side effects are from the Inderol (brand version of propranolol) page from rxmd:

      The following adverse events were observed and have been reported in patients using propranolol.

      Cardiovascular: Bradycardia; congestive heart failure; intensification of AV block; hypotension; paresthesia of hands; thrombocytopenic purpura; arterial insufficiency, usually of the Raynaud type.

      Central Nervous System: Light-headedness, mental depression manifested by insomnia, lassitude, weakness, fatigue; catatonia; visual disturbances; hallucinations; vivid dreams; an acute reversible syndrome characterized by disorientation for time and place, short-term memory loss, emotional lability, slightly clouded sensorium, and decreased performance on neuropsychometrics. For immediate-release formulations, fatigue, lethargy, and vivid dreams appear dose-related.

      Gastrointestinal: Nausea, vomiting, epigastric distress, abdominal cramping, diarrhea, constipation, mesenteric arterial thrombosis, ischemic colitis.

      Allergic: Hypersensitivity reactions, including anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reactions, pharyngitis and agranulocytosis; erythematous rash, fever combined with aching and sore throat; laryngospasm, and respiratory distress.

      Respiratory: Bronchospasm.

      Hematologic: Agranulocytosis, nonthrombocytopenic purpura, thrombocytopenic purpura.

      Autoimmune: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

      Skin and mucous membranes: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome, toxic epidermal necrolysis, dry eyes, exfoliative dermatitis, erythema multiforme, urticaria, alopecia, SLE-like reactions, and psoriasiform rashes. Oculomucocutaneous syndrome involving the skin, serous membranes and conjunctivae reported for a beta blocker (practolol) have not been associated with propranolol.

      Genitourinary: Male impotence; Peyronie’s disease.

      In addition there are a number of potentially life threatening interactions when propranolol is taken with certain other drugs. Consult your health care provider if you are taking other medication regularly.

      Hope this helps

  6. Alannah

    Is my mother’s age the cause of my medical conditions?
    Hi everyone,

    My Mother was 37 when I was born, as was my father. I have a collection of medical conditions, and am wondering if any of them could have been caused by my Mother’s advanced maternal age (35+).

    My conditions are as follows:

    – Systemic Lupus Erythematous. My Maternal Grandmother also had Lupus and passed away from Lupus complications.

    – Arnold Chiari Malformation I. I’ve had symptoms of this my whole life, and it was only diagnosed a couple of years. I had to undergo surgery.

    – Tremor. My Mother and Maternal Grandfather also have this.

    – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This was also recently diagnosed.

    – Cerebellar Ataxia. I’m not too sure about this one. I was diagnosed with this as a toddler due to developmental delays, but I think this may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along.

    – Panic disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. My Mother had some anxiety issues when she was in her 20s and my brother (who is 7 years older) was recently diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common, I suppose.

    – Non-verbal Learning Disorder. Not sure about this one either – it may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along too.

    I think that’s everything!

    So, my question is, do you believe my mother’s age had anything to do with any of my medical conditions? If so, which ones, and why?

    Please don’t answer if you’re not sure, I’d like answers from people who are *relatively* certain.

    Thank you!!

    1. Emily

      Most of those conditions are genetic, and there’s a high likelihood that you would have ended up with some, if not all, of them, even if your mom had been 20 when you were born.

    1. monivros

      Stress cause:
      Aphthous mouth ulcers (most common cause)

      Infectious diseases:
      Recurrence of chicken pox (shingles) in mouth or palate
      Coxackie virus seen in children (also known as hand, foot mouth disease)
      Primary HIV infection
      Syphilis

      Inflammatory conditions like”
      crohn’s disease
      Systemic lupus erythematous (usually painless)
      Behcet’s disease (rare)

  7. johnny a

    how often does a miscarriage happen to a women ?
    so i got a girl pregnet , fml and she waants to keep it and i barely knoe the girl anyways . shee was telling me that her mom had 2 miscarriages back in the day and her older sister also had a miscarriage what are the chances of this happening to her? she has also drank alcohol over 3 times. what could happen to my child if it is mine?

    1. Mrs. DIVYARANI श्रीमति दिव्यारानीديفيا راني

      There are medical disorders which may be connected to an increased risk of miscarriage. Three which are supposedly linked are diabetes, hypothyroidism and systemic lupus erythematous. In addition, women who are over 40 years old have a 10 percent chance of miscarriage, in comparison to a 2 percent chance in someone less than 30 years old. The uterus of the woman being misshapen or the cervix being incompetent may also increase the chances of miscarriage. Finally, the most common cause of miscarriage is a significant genetic abnormality of the fetus. In miscarriages in the first trimester, approximately two thirds have significant chromosomal anomalies, with about half of these being Down’s Syndrome. This is not an inherited trait from the mother or the father; it is usually one single nonrecurring event.

      Sometimes when a pregnancy occurs, there is an empty yolk sac seen on ultrasound — this is called an “anembryonic pregnancy” or a “blighted ovum.” Interestingly, this type of pregnancy normally will miscarry itself, as well as documented pregnancies (by ultrasound) which are grossly genetically or morphologically abnormal. This would lead us to believe that somehow nature has a way of identifying some of its major, nonsurvivable mistakes and causes them to be miscarried.

  8. jenny c

    How common are miscarriages?
    I am 5.5 weeks pregnant and this is my first pregnancy. I am in my mid 20’s and healthy. We really want this baby and it took one cycle to conceive.

    I have been going to internet forums for women trying to conceive and forums for already pregnant women. I have been reading a lot of posts from women who have infertility, miscarriages, stilbirths and many with multiple miscarriages.

    Is this common or am I going to forums for women who have fertility issues?

    I am really scared now from reading forums with miscarriages!!

    1. happymommy

      There are two statistics to answer your question regarding how often miscarriages occur. As far as we are able to determine, it can be approximated that in the first 8 weeks of pregnancy, the miscarriage rate is about 10-15 per cent of a clinically recognizable pregnancy. Often a woman may not know that she is pregnant, and after being slightly late for her period, get a heavier than usual menstrual cycle. This is often not recognized as a miscarriage but instead just a late, heavy period. That’s why in the earliest part of pregnancy it is difficult to quantify actual percentages of miscarriages.

      The second statistic is that if a live, appropriately grown fetus is present at 8 weeks gestation, the fetal loss rate (miscarriage) over the next 20 weeks (up to 28 weeks) is about 3 percent.
      Even now, there is still much confusion about the various causes of miscarriage. Some documented causes of miscarriage include infections such as rubella and syphillis; environmental factors such as exposure to extreme radiation; maternal smoking and alcohol consumption. Women who smoke 20 cigarettes daily and consume more than seven standard alcoholic drinks per week have a fourfold increase in their risk of miscarriage.

      There are medical disorders which may be connected to an increased risk of miscarriage. Three which are supposedly linked are diabetes, hypothyroidism and systemic lupus erythematous. In addition, women who are over 40 years old have a 10 percent chance of miscarriage, in comparison to a 2 percent chance in someone less than 30 years old. The uterus of the woman being misshapen or the cervix being incompetent may also increase the chances of miscarriage. Finally, the most common cause of miscarriage is a significant genetic abnormality of the fetus. In miscarriages in the first trimester, approximately two thirds have significant chromosomal anomalies, with about half of these being Down’s Syndrome. This is not an inherited trait from the mother or the father; it is usually one single nonrecurring event.

      Sometimes when a pregnancy occurs, there is an empty yolk sac seen on ultrasound — this is called an “anembryonic pregnancy” or a “blighted ovum.” Interestingly, this type of pregnancy normally will miscarry itself, as well as documented pregnancies (by ultrasound) which are grossly genetically or morphologically abnormal. This would lead us to believe that somehow nature has a way of identifying some of its major, nonsurvivable mistakes and causes them to be miscarried.

  9. Alannah

    Is my mother’s age the cause of my medical conditions?
    Hi everyone,

    My Mother was 37 when I was born, as was my father. I have a collection of medical conditions, and am wondering if any of them could have been caused by my Mother’s advanced maternal age (35+).

    My conditions are as follows:

    – Systemic Lupus Erythematous. My Maternal Grandmother also had Lupus and passed away from Lupus complications.

    – Arnold Chiari Malformation I. I’ve had symptoms of this my whole life, and it was only diagnosed a couple of years. I had to undergo surgery.

    – Tremor. My Mother and Maternal Grandfather also have this.

    – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This was also recently diagnosed.

    – Cerebellar Ataxia. I’m not too sure about this one. I was diagnosed with this as a toddler due to developmental delays, but I think this may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along.

    – Panic disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. My Mother had some anxiety issues when she was in her 20s and my brother (who is 7 years older) was recently diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common, I suppose.

    – Non-verbal Learning Disorder. Not sure about this one either – it may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along too.

    I think that’s everything!

    So, my question is, do you believe my mother’s age had anything to do with any of my medical conditions? If so, which ones, and why?

    Please don’t answer if you’re not sure, I’d like answers from people who are *relatively* certain.

    Thank you!!

    1. Squeakeh Ninjeh

      I’d say it was more likely that these conditions are just hereditary (because you have a family history), and nothing to do with your mothers age.

      The ones that don’t appear to be hereditary may just be from dormant gene’s, or that both your parents are carriers of the trigger genes.

  10. Alannah

    Which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at birth of child) cause?
    Hi everyone,

    To the best of your knowledge, which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at the birth of the child):

    – Learning disabilities/disorders

    – Anxiety disorders

    – Malformations (such as Arnold Chiari Malformation type I)

    – Systemic lupus erythematous

    – Female endocrine disorders

    If they can, and if you know why, can you please explain?

    Thank you!

    1. S P

      In the mother or baby? In the baby it would be learning disorders like down syndrome or cp. CP is a lack of oxygen to the baby at birth. Also, some of the children born to older mothers are born premature, so they have issues with that.

  11. rachel☮❤

    What exactly is cutaneous lupus?
    I’ve just been diagnosed with cutaneous lupus a little while ago. I’ve read a page or two about it, but I’m not sure I fully understand.

    What are the effects of it, and is it caused by anything?
    And if there is anything you think I should know about it, please tell me.

    1. tomboy91135

      Cutaneous lupus — which accounts for about 10% of all lupus cases — affects only the skin and can create various kinds of skin lesions. A red, raised, scaly, coin-shaped rash is the classic rash that appears with this form of lupus. This localized rash occurs most frequently on the face, although it may appear on other parts of the body as well. Scarring often develops as the rash heals. Because exposure to ultraviolet light often triggers cutaneous lupus, it is recommended that individuals with this form limit their sun exposure and use sunscreen when out of doors. Some people with cutaneous lupus go on to develop systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) I hope i helped

    1. levat

      This drug is contraindicated in persons who have shown hypersensitivity to any of the tetracyclines.
      SIDE EFFECTS

      Due to oral doxycycline’s virtually complete absorption, side effects of the lower bowel, particularly diarrhea, have been infrequent. The following adverse reactions have been observed in patients receiving tetracyclines:

      Gastrointestinal: anorexia, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, glossitis, dysphagia, enterocolitis, and inflammatory lesions (with monilial overgrowth) in the anogenital region. Hepatotoxicity has been reported rarely. These reactions have been caused by both the oral and parenteral administration of tetracyclines. Rare instances of esophagitis and esophageal ulcerations have been reported in patients receiving capsule and tablet forms of the drugs in the tetracycline class. Most of these patients took medications immediately before going to bed (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION.)

      Skin: maculopapular and erythematous rashes. Exfoliative dermatitis has been reported but is uncommon. Photosensitivity is discussed above. (See WARNINGS.)

      Renal toxicity: rise in BUN has been reported and is apparently dose related
      Hypersensitivity reactions: urticaria, angioneurotic edema, anaphylaxis, anaphylactoid purpura, serum sickness, pericarditis, and exacerbation of systemic lupus erythematosus.

      Blood: Hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, and eosinophilia have been reported.

      Other: bulging fontanels in infants and intracranial hypertension in adults. See PRECAUTIONS, General.

      When given over prolonged periods, tetracyclines have been reported to produce brown-black microscopic discoloration of the thyroid gland. No abnormalities of thyroid function studies are known to occur.

  12. Alannah

    Is my mother’s age the cause of my medical conditions?
    Hi everyone,

    My Mother was 37 when I was born, as was my father. I have a collection of medical conditions, and am wondering if any of them could have been caused by my Mother’s advanced maternal age (35+).

    My conditions are as follows:

    – Systemic Lupus Erythematous. My Maternal Grandmother also had Lupus and passed away from Lupus complications.

    – Arnold Chiari Malformation I. I’ve had symptoms of this my whole life, and it was only diagnosed a couple of years. I had to undergo surgery.

    – Tremor. My Mother and Maternal Grandfather also have this.

    – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This was also recently diagnosed.

    – Cerebellar Ataxia. I’m not too sure about this one. I was diagnosed with this as a toddler due to developmental delays, but I think this may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along.

    – Panic disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. My Mother had some anxiety issues when she was in her 20s and my brother (who is 7 years older) was recently diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common, I suppose.

    – Non-verbal Learning Disorder. Not sure about this one either – it may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along too.

    I think that’s everything!

    So, my question is, do you believe my mother’s age had anything to do with any of my medical conditions? If so, which ones, and why?

    Please don’t answer if you’re not sure, I’d like answers from people who are *relatively* certain.

    Thank you!!

  13. Alannah

    Which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at birth of child) cause?
    Hi everyone,

    To the best of your knowledge, which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at the birth of the child):

    – Learning disabilities/disorders

    – Anxiety disorders

    – Malformations (such as Arnold Chiari Malformation type I)

    – Systemic lupus erythematous

    – Female endocrine disorders

    If they can, and if you know why, can you please explain?

    Thank you!

    1. science teacher

      As the body ages endocrine disorders do increase.Lupus tends to be seen in older mothers.
      Many birth defects can be observed due to the age of the eggs and developing conditions.
      Increases in Downs syndrome(chromosome disorder)infertility, twins, miscarriage,effect of other body health,and pregnancy problems increase.

  14. Alannah

    Which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at birth of child) cause?
    Hi everyone,

    To the best of your knowledge, which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at the birth of the child):

    – Learning disabilities/disorders

    – Anxiety disorders

    – Malformations (such as Arnold Chiari Malformation type I)

    – Systemic lupus erythematous

    – Female endocrine disorders

    If they can, and if you know why, can you please explain?

    Thank you!

    1. Linda R

      35 is not an advanced age to have a child. Learning disabilities have multiple possible causes. Anxiety disorders are not related to the age of the mother. Malformations and lupus have a genetic component that is not related to maternal age. Female endocrine disorders can originate in the pituitary or be the result of exposure to endocrine disruptors. Sorry, but you are barking up the wrong tree here.

  15. Alannah

    Is my mother’s age the cause of my medical conditions?
    Hi everyone,

    My Mother was 37 when I was born, as was my father. I have a collection of medical conditions, and am wondering if any of them could have been caused by my Mother’s advanced maternal age (35+).

    My conditions are as follows:

    – Systemic Lupus Erythematous. My Maternal Grandmother also had Lupus and passed away from Lupus complications.

    – Arnold Chiari Malformation I. I’ve had symptoms of this my whole life, and it was only diagnosed a couple of years. I had to undergo surgery.

    – Tremor. My Mother and Maternal Grandfather also have this.

    – Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome. This was also recently diagnosed.

    – Cerebellar Ataxia. I’m not too sure about this one. I was diagnosed with this as a toddler due to developmental delays, but I think this may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along.

    – Panic disorder and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder. My Mother had some anxiety issues when she was in her 20s and my brother (who is 7 years older) was recently diagnosed with Generalized Anxiety Disorder. Anxiety disorders are very common, I suppose.

    – Non-verbal Learning Disorder. Not sure about this one either – it may have been the Arnold Chiari Malformation all along too.

    I think that’s everything!

    So, my question is, do you believe my mother’s age had anything to do with any of my medical conditions? If so, which ones, and why?

    Please don’t answer if you’re not sure, I’d like answers from people who are *relatively* certain.

    Thank you!!

    1. Koretta

      None of those are chromosomal diseases which are what old mothers are at risk for when having babies over 30. These are things that are individual to you or are pre-disposed genetic problems, which would have nothing to do with your mothers age.

  16. Alannah

    Which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at birth of child) cause?
    Hi everyone,

    To the best of your knowledge, which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at the birth of the child):

    – Learning disabilities/disorders

    – Anxiety disorders

    – Malformations (such as Arnold Chiari Malformation type I)

    – Systemic lupus erythematous

    – Female endocrine disorders

    If they can, and if you know why, can you please explain?

    Thank you!

    1. cathrl69

      I think you’ve missed the point a bit. There are statistical risks associated with all these things. One of the risk factors tends to be maternal age. It doesn’t “cause” them.

      Nobody knows what causes anxiety disorders anyway, so quite how anyone could explain their links to maternal age is a bit of a mystery.

  17. Alannah

    Which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at birth of child) cause?
    Hi everyone,

    To the best of your knowledge, which of the following can advanced maternal age (age 35+ at the birth of the child):

    – Learning disabilities/disorders

    – Anxiety disorders

    – Malformations (such as Arnold Chiari Malformation type I)

    – Systemic lupus erythematous

    – Female endocrine disorders

    If they can, and if you know why, can you please explain?

    Thank you!

    1. Yahooer

      It really depends on the woman herself, but basically, “advanced maternal age” has been shown to cause:

      Decreased fertility: because they tend to ovulate less frequently. Some health conditions are more common after age 34. Some of the conditions are:

      Optometrists (a condition in which tissue attaches to the ovaries or fallopian tubes)
      Blocked fallopian tubes (sometimes resulting from past infections)
      Fibroids (non-cancerous growths in the uterus)

      While women over age 35 may have more difficulty conceiving, they also have a greater chance of having twins. The chances of having twins increases naturally with age. Women over 35 also are more likely to undergo fertility treatment, which also increases the chance of twins (as well as triplets and other multiples). With this, some birth defects can occur from being premature.

      A woman’s risk of having a baby with certain birth defects involving chromosomes (the structures in cells that contain genes) increases with age. Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal birth defect. Affected children have varying degrees of mental retardation and physical birth defects. A woman’s risk of having a baby with Down syndrome is

      At age 25, 1 in 1,250
      At age 30, 1 in 1,000
      At age 35, 1 in 400
      At age 40, 1 in 100
      At 45, 1 in 30
      At 49, a 1 in 10

      Women over age 35 are more likely than younger women to have a health condition that began before pregnancy. Some health conditions, such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and kidney and heart problems, can affect pregnancy. For example, poorly controlled diabetes can contribute to birth defects and miscarriage, and poorly controlled high blood pressure can slow fetal growth.

      It has also been shown that the chance of Autism is increased to a woman who becomes pregnant after age 34.

      It is well-known that older women have a higher chance of having a baby with a genetic abnormality, such as Down’s syndrome, Edwards’ syndrome or Patau’s syndrome. Figures for England and Wales show that your chance of having a baby with a genetic abnormality rises from 1 in 500 between the ages of 35-39, to 1 in 250 between 40-44, up to approximately 1 in 70 if you are 45 or over.

      As for the rest of the disorders that you mentioned, many of them are either genetic, or can be based on a child’s environment. Hope this helped

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