Beautiful glass windows can enhance the beauty of any home, especially when you request window cleaning services every 6 months as part of its maintenance. But have we stopped to think about the different types of glass used to make these beautiful windows? Yes. Although they may look similar to each other there are different types of glass and each type has its own qualities that make it different from the others. There are 5 types of glass: Tempered, Annealed, Low-E, Insulated and Heat Strengthened.

Tempered Glass. This is also known as safety glass because it breaks in tiny pieces thereby protecting people from getting serious lacerations and deep cuts. It is four times tougher than annealed glass. Tempered glass is a common choice for storm doors, refrigerator trays, shower doors and outdoor patios because it is very strong. It is processed through chemical treatments and is a lot stronger than normal glass.

Annealed Glass. Annealing is the method of slow cooling of glass to alleviate internal stress. After the glass is formed it is placed on temperature controlled rollers and made to cool slowly. Annealed glass is easy to maintain. Like when window cleaning and you need to use a scraper, because it does not scratch easily. It breaks in big uneven shards.

Low-E Glass. This type of glass is used to cool down building and homes because it is covered by a thin film that either absorbs or reflects UV rays. Its effectiveness depends on how thick the coating is and whether it is positioned on a #2 or #3 surface. When set up on a #2 surface the Low E coating will absorb outside heat decreasing heat absorption and cooling costs. On the other hand, when set up on a #3 surface it will reflect light from inside the room and decrease heat loss during cold winter months.

Insulated Glass. This type of glass is composed of multiple layers of glass panes that are separated by dry air. The panes are sealed hermetically and the air space allows insulation against the transfer of heat or sound.

Heat Strengthened Glass. This type of glass is treated to heat to create surface compression. This is done by heating up annealed glass to a temperature of 1150 Fahrenheit. Both sides of the glass are then cooled down briskly at the same time. This allows the surfaces to remain is a state of elevated compression. Heat strengthened glass breaks similarly to annealed glass. It shatters in tiny pieces preventing deep cuts and injuries in case of breakage.

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Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/home-and-family-articles/5-different-types-glass-used-windows-749144.html


what are the 5 types of lupus

17 thoughts on “What Are The 5 Types Of Lupus

  1. Kammon

    Can someone with an uneven olive skin tone use tanning lotion?
    I mean would it look good or I must be white in order to get perfect results?

    1. Sur La Mer

      First of all, you have UNEVEN olive skin tone.
      Could mean: You’ve had a self-tanner mishap…or you have a benign condition called melasma that’s often associated with oral contraceptives, says Dina D. Strachan, M. D., a dermatologist in New York City. Doctors aren’t sure why some birth-control pills cause these dark patches on the forehead, cheeks, or upper lip, but they do know UV exposure makes them worse.

      For one thing: Oral contraceptives can upset your skin, since hormones in BCP make pigment cells more sensitive to the sun, resulting in brown blotches.
      Doctor’s advice: Talk to your doctor about switching to a low-dose estrogen formula, like Yaz or Ortho Tri-Cycles Lo, or the non-estrogen type of contraception known as the mini pill, says Sundaram. Wearing sunscreen will also help. “If you’ve had hyperpigmentation on the pill, you’re likely to be sensitive during a pregnancy too.” she says. In bulk cases, higher levels of hormones are to blame.
      ~ Allure 1-12

      I’ve been protecting myself from the sun since age 9, by using umbrella or floppy hat. But no matter, I got Discoid Lupus, but it took 12 years for them to fade. Other than that, I’ve had flawless skin all my almost 60 years of my life. Use a floppy hat or umbrella.
      Lotions does not protect you from nasty, painful burns. Lotions does not protect you from skin cancer. Lotions does not protect you from skin diseases. Lotions does not protect you from discolorations – permanently. And lotions does not protect you from skin tags, freckles, moles, they will only get larger, darker, and bumpier as they are exposed from UV.

      This year, 56,900 new cases of skin cancer will be reported; most of these people (not so coincidentally) don’t take care of their skin when out in the sun.
      March 5, 2011 2:28 PM:
      Melanoma is the leading cause of death from skin disease. An estimated 68,130 new cases of melanoma were diagnosed in the United States during 2010 and about 8,700 people died from the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute. Two million people are diagnosed with skin cancer in the US each year, according to the EPA’s Sun-Wise Program. That’s more than breast, colon, lung and prostate cancer cases combine!

      Take the Skin Picture Quiz – Identify These Common Skin Conditions on MedicineNet.

      The use of TANNING lotion can only make the uneven skin tone MORE DARKER, or worst from the sun.

  2. julie

    What kind of Neurological symptoms do you have with Lupus?
    I’m being tested for lupus after being sick for 2 yrs and I have tons of neurological symptoms just wondering if these are common symptoms for lupus. here are my symptoms.
    Burning stinging headaches, dizzy, lightheaded,vertigo, seizure type incidents, sharp shooting pains in head, also get weard sensations on my body like warm water pouring on me. Any info will be appreciated. If you have any neurological symptoms from Lupus pleas list them for me. Thanks!

    1. Linda R

      Some lupus patients have neurological symptoms, some do not. Lupus symptoms vary widely from patient to patient.

      Headaches could be caused by lupus or by Raynaud’s phenomenon or other things. Many lupus patients have Raynaud’s, a condition in which stress or cool temperatures cause the nerves to tell the blood vessels to clamp down and restrict blood flow, usually to hands and feet, but can also cause headaches.

      Lightheadedness can be caused by a number of things as well. Lupus patient are often anemic, When you are anemica, there is not enough available oxygen in your blood, which could account for light headedness or dizziness.

      Vertigo usually has to do with the inner ear. Lupus can cause inflammation anywhere, including the inner ear.

      I am not sure what you mean my “seizure type” incidents. Do you lose consciousness? Do you convulse? Some lupus patients do have seizures. But seizures can be caused by many other things.

      Lupus patients with antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (sticky blood) which causes clots may have TIAs or ministrokes. This could account for your head pain and seizure type incidents. Ask to have your blood tested for this.

      As for the weird sensations, please find a clearer way to describe that as well. If you tell the doctor that you have “seizure type incidents” and “weird sensations on your body” you are not helping the doctor get to the root cause of your problem. If these weird sensations are painful, you could have neuropathy which sometimes comes with lupus, or diabtetes, or multiple sclerosis, or other things.

      As a patient your job is to give the doctor the best and clearest information possible. It is the doctor’s job to connect the dots. A diagnosis of lupus is made based on family history, your medical history, a wide variety of lab tests and after everything else is ruled out. There is no definitive lab test for lupus.

      To do your job, keep a symptom journal including
      1. a clear description of the symptom
      2. when it started
      3. how often it happens
      4. how long it lasts
      5. what makes it feel better
      6. what makes it feel worse
      7. to what degree does it interfere with your activities of daily living

      Then create a concise summary and bring a copy for your doc and a copy for you.

  3. wsfi

    is there any funny sounding charitys?
    i am looking for an odd sounding charity for my citizenship coursework. if you know of any could you please list them and there websites?

  4. sialiasialia

    what vine will grow quickly to cover a fence, but not overgrow too much?
    I am in Zone 5, and looking for a vine to cover a fence quickly, but that won’t get overgrown or too wild.

    1. Czar Walters, Child Saver!

      The other poster is correct – Honeysuckle will definitely do the trick. It’s a hardy plant with a lovely fragrance, but it can get out of control!

      I personally like moonflower. I believe it’s a type of morning glory. It has huge, beautiful flowers and a pleasant fragrance. It only blooms at night, though it’s worth it to me. Mine has never gotten out of control like the honeysuckle on my backyard fence, which I never even planted to begin with – it just showed up one season.

      Another good selection which I grow is Lablab purpureus. It has small purple flowers and purple seed pods that resemble flat, wide green beans in shape. The leaves are heart-shaped, and a beautiful dark green with hints of purple. They are hardy (in my zone at least, 7B) and don’t grow out of control. You can also eat the seed pods, they taste like fava beans.

      You could also try bouganvillea. It primarily grows outward in a circle with a radius of around 15 feet, and is used as a ground cover plant. It might work if your fence isn’t super-high.

      Other climbing plants:

      Any Ipomoea species (morning glory)

      Humulus lupus (hops.) These resemble Kudzu, but don’t grow anywhere near as quickly.

      Caiophera
      Clematis erecta, C. x durandii, C. heracleifolia, C. Jouiana
      Cobaea scandens
      Convulvulus tricolor
      Eccromocarpus scaber
      Lagenaria
      Lathyrus
      Mikania scandens
      Rhodochiton atrosanguinieum
      Solanum dulcamara ‘Variegatum’
      Thunbergia alata
      Tropaeolum

  5. Caleb

    What kind of charity or charities do you give to and why?
    I love the idea of charities, and have recently started to look into giving more to them, but I like to know exactly what a charity is about and why they do the things they do.

    So if you give to a charity or charities, why that specific one or group of ones over others?

    1. Anonymous

      I live in Canada…
      the charities I donate to are the:

      1) Arthritis Society- I do the Arthritis Walk every year.
      2) Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Society – I have done the MS Walk and I always buy their flowers on Mother’s Day weekend.
      3) Cancer Society – by buying their daffodils in April, or whatever else they are selling, as their means of fundraising or sponsoring a person that is participating in a fundraising event. ie. The Cancer Relay of Life.
      4) Diabetes Research- I do a running event in May that raises money for Diabetes Research

      Basically, I give to health related charities exist to help people afflected with those particular health problems cope with them, help arrange treatment, and lifestyle changes that can help.

      5) I donate to Easter Seals since they help people with disablities… ie. wheelchair bound individuals.
      6) I donate to World Vision that helps out families and individuals in undeveloped or developing countries at Christmas time.

      And I tend to put my change in the donation containers at the check out in stores for whichever charity it may be. I do not go shopping much at all though… the change I don’t donate are unique coins that I give to my mother since she likes those type of coins.

      I tend to give to health charities since I want to help people in pain. I am autoimmune so I do have joint pain, inflammatory pain & vien spasms (could be rheumatoid arthritis or lupus).

      But I believe that it is important to help others out if you can… even a small gesture is important, we exist as individuals but we are all chained together and we are all affected by the people around us. I wish for everybody to be happy! That may not be possible but I want to help, I wish to help, someone.

  6. in COGNITO *

    does methotrexate cause fertility issues or other complications after molar pregnancy?
    It’s been 5 years since and I’ve had a daughter and adopted a son.

    does methotrexate cause fertility issues or other complications

    Also I’ve developed Lupus like symptoms (joint pain, photosensitivity, pos ANA, Nephritis, mouth sores)
    Can this be caused by a molar pregnancy ot metotrexate?

    1. sokokl

      The Lupus type symptoms could be coming from the Methotrexate, but I would recommend getting in touch with your rheumatologist as well to see what they say, and also I would recommend checking with your pharmacist and OB/GYN to see what they say about the potential for infertility with this medication.

  7. Anthony N

    what are the positive effects that nude sunbathing can do for depression?
    i think sunbathing nude as long as you take care to avoid plain line of sight is a great thing and very therapeutic. i wanted to ask this section why sunbathing nude helps make us feel better if we’re open minded to trying it out? give a fairly detailed psychological explanation.

    1. NudeNude

      Even dermatologists, who worry about the sun’s ravaging effects on the skin in the form of cancer, age spots, and wrinkles, acknowledge that we could all use a little sun exposure. “Being out in the sun boosts our mood, improves sleep, and promotes vitamin D production,” says James Spencer, associate clinical professor of dermatology at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine in New York. “There’s no controversy about that.” Still, he emphasizes, the operative word is little when it comes to exposure. “The majority of people aren’t putting on sunscreen every time they step outside, and that 5 or 10 minutes a day of casual exposure is probably all you need.” Much attention has been paid to the benefits of vitamin D, which is manufactured when the sun’s UV-B rays hit the skin and which protects against cancer, bone brittleness, heart disease, and a host of other ills. But there are other payoffs to a small daily dose of sunlight, including:

      • Better sleep. Natural daylight helps shut off your body’s production of melatonin, a hormone produced at night that makes you drowsy. This can help you maintain a normal circadian rhythm, so you’re more likely to feel tired at bedtime when it’s dark outside. Going outside for 15 minutes at the same time each day, preferably in the morning, gives your body a clear signal that it’s no longer night. Also, forgo the sunglasses if possible, since this will enable sunlight to pass unhindered through your eyes to the brain’s pineal gland, triggering the gland to stop releasing melatonin.

      • Happier outlook. A type of depression called seasonal affective disorder affects some people during the winter when they don’t get enough sunlight. Experts now believe that sunlight has widespread mood-elevating effects, possibly because the “happy” hormone serotonin increases when nights are short and days are long. In fact, psychiatrists often recommend that depressed individuals go outside in the sun for 30 minutes a day. Bonus: You can slather on all the sunscreen you want and still reap the mood benefit.

      • Protection from autoimmune diseases. Exposure to UV radiation appears to suppress an overactive immune system, according to an April report published in Environmental Health Perspectives. This could explain why exposure to UV rays may help with autoimmune diseases like psoriasis and lupus; one recent study also suggests it might help alleviate asthma.

      • Lessening of Alzheimer’s symptoms. Elderly Alzheimer’s patients exposed to bright lighting during the day—from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.—got better scores on a mental exam, had fewer symptoms of depression, and lost less function than did those exposed to dim daytime lighting, according to a study published this month in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The researchers attributed the improvement to more-regular circadian rhythms, which are thrown out of whack when advanced dementia sets in.

  8. Martin L

    Liberals: What are your Top 5 criteria in choosing a presidential candidate?
    This question is just for liberals. I ask the same question to conservatives in a separate question…if you’re a conservative, please answer that other question and don’t take this question as a forum for liberal-bashing.

    1. BBg

      I 100% agree with Lettie D.

      I think the cost of living is way too high compared to most income and the rise of space between the rich and the poor is getting too great. I think we must help ourselves before we help others. (On simple terms, It’s like having a dentist with yellow, black, crooked and missing teeth. How would you like that?) I do not think we should force our ways simply because we believe it is better and superior, especially to those in the middle east, whom have very different views and religion.
      Also, I’m very against the decision to stop social security for some young, current and future generations. Since my mother has Lupus I know how much this money has an impact on families, as she can not work due to it, and also has an amputated foot. This also ties along with stem-cell research, as it is the only known (developing) cure for Lupus, this auto-immune disease. Discovering an easier and safer process for transplants would be amazing, as it helps not only Lupus and all auto-immune disease (AIDS, for instance), by creating a new immune system, but also to other diseases as well.

      One thing I would add though, is I am Pro-Choice. My #1 reason is that I think women’s rights should not be limited like this. I believe that abortion should be legal FOR THIS SAKE, and I know some believe it is wrong, but some do believe they should go through with this process. As I say, I am pro-choice, not pro-abortion. If you have the option, you have the choice TO or NOT to do this, and I think there is no arguing to that.

      Global Warming issues are also at the top of my list.
      I think that instead of offering light bulbs that waste energy and light bulbs that save it, we should slowly start stopping the development of energy-wasters and pick up the development of energy-savers, so that soon, prices go down because they are not so unique and that they will be the most common light bulb type offered.
      We need to find an alternate energy source. We are using too much coal, etc, and why should we waste our time using nonrenewable resources that won’t be back for thousands of years while we can use crops, like corn, for fuel? How wonderful of a discovery that is, and we aren’t even using it.
      I do not believe that we should waste our time arguing over whether what scientists say will happen to the globe (temperature, weather patterns, sea levels, melting ice…) is true or not, why take the chance? This is a lesson learned from Katrina, the people and the government delayed reaction time because a tragedy like the one proposed had never happened before. Chances were taken, and millions of lives were lost. Do we want to take those same chances? It is much safer to worry about the globe, just in case. Otherwise, we could be destroying it. Even if this change was natural, we are not positive at the moment and there is no more damage we can cause by attempting to reverse what we have done. (As an asthma patient, I feel strongly about this on a personal level, also, not just a global one).

  9. Emilie

    how tall and heavy are the usual European wolf?
    I am curious, because i study other types of wolves, and i can never remember their weight and height. So, i happened to stumble upon the European wolf, and now i am curious. Please help me!!

    1. Wizard

      The Eurasian Wolf (Canis lupus lupus), also known as the, European, Common[2] or Forest Wolf[3] is a subspecies of grey wolf which has the largest range among wolf subspecies and is the most common in Europe and Asia, ranging through Mongolia, China, Russia, Scandinavia, Western Europe and the Himalayan Mountains. Compared to their North American cousins, Eurasian wolves tend to have longer, more highly placed ears, narrower heads, more slender loins and coarser, tawnier coloured fur.[4] Compared to Indian wolves, Eurasian wolves are larger, and have longer, broader skulls.[5] In Europe, wolves rarely form large packs like in North America, as their lives are more strongly influenced by human activities.[6] Because of this, Eurasian wolves tend to be more adaptable than North American wolves in the face of human expansion

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