Sometimes a Systemic Yeast Infection can have light symptoms, and because of this they're dismissed as nothing to concerned about. The problem is, this allows the yeast to enter the bloodstream where a lot of different problems can eventuate and can even become a life-threatening situation.

The body naturally has a certain amount of yeast that lives in the body in small quantities and actually help the body, without doing any harm to it. There are also different types of microorganisms inside the body that are there to keep the yeast in check so an infection does not occur.

On-going stress attacks, poor choices of food, normal pregnancy changes, immune system deficiency diseases, antibiotic medications and other disease may abolish the tiny microorganisms and thereby allow the Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms to rage.

The Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms can differ from each individual, but here a few of the most usual ones:

Heavy sense of exhaustion and unusual run down feelings may arise.

1. The feelings of sensory disturbances, unusual muscle aches and pains, continual headaches, constant dizziness, and complaints of the sufferering of persistent tiredness are signs of a person with Systemic Yeast Infection.

2. Unusual or sudden sensitivity to chemicals or new food allergies.
Arising troubles which haven't occurred before with several chemicals or foods are common with those suffering from Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms.

3. Problems with the gastrointestinal tract.

On many occasions, as touched on in the previous detail of the food allergies, flatulence, inflammatory bowel disease, rectal itching, constipation, and diarrhea are the most common of the Symptoms.

It is even possible for thrush, a Yeast Infection affecting the mouth and/or throat, to develop.

4. Onset of urinary and genital problems.

5. Development of hives and skin rashes.

You could even be having a case of hives, and not know where they came from.

6. Suddenly feeling irritable or mildly depressed.

Many times people complain of Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms that include: mental confusion, feeling of being in a 'fog', difficulty focusing or concentrating, sleepness nights, memory loss, and decreased attention span.

7. Problems with the autoimmune system.

Some autoimmune disorders that normally become worse from a Systemic Yeast Infection are sarcoidosis, scleroderma, myasthenia gravis, arthritis, hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenic purpura, or systemic lupus erythematosus.

Yeast flourish on a body that is fed with sugar, refined starch, and chemical additives.
These chemicals, starches and sugars are also readily present in bread, cookies, chips and other junk foods which are a large part of many peoples diets.

When someone is under immense stress, the microorganisms in the body that control the yeast start to die off.

Anytime you think you may have a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms, you need to check with your doctor about what tests need to be run to determine what your body's level of Yeast organism is.
All in all, remember that it's vital to know if you are dealing with a Systemic Yeast Infection Symptoms so you can get the proper treatment.

About the author:

Source: http://www.sooperarticles.com/health-fitness-articles/women-health-articles/systemic-yeast-infection-symptoms-7-signs-watch-out-464763.html


what type of disease is systemic lupus erythematosus

8 thoughts on “What Type Of Disease Is Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

  1. Sweet Pea

    What does it mean to have a possible positive lupus test?
    I have been having serious joint pain for some time now. My doctor tested me for arthritis, RA, and lupus. He said the test came back as a possible positive for lupus and he is sending me to a Rheumatologist for further testing. Does this mean they just don’t know or does it mean they are sending me for a confirmation? Has anybody had this happen to them?

    1. gpk.gr

      Dear Sweat Pea,
      the diagnosis of rheumatic diseases and specially systemic lupus erythematosus is based on clinical findings and past medical history. Laboratory values are use mainly for confirmation and sometimes to estimate disease activity. Please be patient until you visit your rheumatologist. As a specialist he will guide you through the differential diagnostic of arthritis (over 200 types!). I’m pretty sure you will feel frustrated after the first visit but afterwards you will begin to built a relationship with your rheumatologist based on his ability to understand your complaints and relieve your pain. Feel free to contact me and ask again!

  2. tor

    Is there a diet for those with Lupus?
    I want to know if there are any diets to followto relieve the symtoms of lupus. I heard that citrus aggreivates the joints, which sucks cause I love oranges and lemons. Althafa sprouts are not good either. Anyone have idea where to find a hit list of things I should limit or not eat?
    Are there certain things I should avoid?

    1. kimchungtran

      Dear Asker!

      Here is a good Diet and Lifestyle changes for patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

      The following are some tips for maintaining a healthy diet:

      * Eat a diet low in saturated fats. Not all fats are unhealthy. Some studies suggest that omega-3 fatty acids, which are fat compounds found in fish oil, black currant or primrose seed oils, and flax seed, have anti-inflammatory and nerve protecting actions.

      Omega-3 fatty acids are essential acids. Medical research suggests they may have anti-inflammatory properties.

      * Choose whole grains and fresh vegetables and fruits. According to some studies, a diet rich in fruits and vegetables can lower homocysteine levels, which are elevated in patients with SLE and may be a risk factor for heart disease. Researchers are also investigating compounds called indoles, also known as mustard oil, which are found in broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, kale, kohlrabi, collard and mustard greens, rutabaga, turnips, and bok choy. Indoles stimulate enzymes that convert estrogen to a more benign type. Eating vegetables certainly will not cure SLE, but they offer many general health benefits.

      * Get most proteins from vegetables, particularly soy.
      * Avoiding dairy and meat products may help protect the kidneys.
      * Take extra calcium and vitamin D to prevent osteoporosis (this is particularly useful for patients taking corticosteroids).
      * Supplements of vitamins B12, B6, and folate may be necessary, especially in people whose blood tests show high levels of homocysteine.
      * Exercise is safe, but patients should not expect it to improve symptoms, including joint aches and fatigue.
      * Restrict salt (particularly for patients with signs of high blood pressure and kidney disease).

      Of possible interest to patients with SLE is a 2002 report that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (also an inflammatory autoimmune condition) experienced improvement when they went on the Mediterranean diet, which stresses fish (which contains anti-inflammatory factors), olive oil, garlic, whole grains, nuts, and fresh fruits and vegetables. In any case, such a diet is heart-healthy, which is important for patients with SLE

      Prevention Against Infections

      Patients should minimize their exposure to crowds or people with contagious illnesses. Careful hygiene, including dental hygiene, is also important.

      Avoiding SLE Triggers

      Simple preventive measures include avoiding overexposure to ultraviolet rays and wearing protective clothing and sunblocks. There is some concern that allergy shots may cause flare ups in certain cases. Patients who may benefit from them should discuss risks and benefits with an SLE specialist. In general, patients with SLE should use only hypoallergenic cosmetics or hair products.

      Reducing Stress

      Chronic stress has profound physical effects and influences the progression of SLE. According to one study, patients with SLE differ from healthy individuals in their immune responses to stress, and psychological stress can induce flare-ups in patients with SLE. Patients should try to avoid undue emotional or physical stress. Getting adequate rest of at least 8 hours and possibly napping during the day may be helpful. Maintaining social relationships and healthy activities may also help prevent the depression and anxiety associated with the disease.

      Hope that may help you!
      Good luck!

  3. Unknown

    What are some of the medical treatments for lupus? How do people die from lupus do their organs sweal in?
    the body how does it happen and what are some of the treatments for lupus?

  4. Stephanie D

    Which has more benefits Omega 3 or Flax Seed ?
    I am currently taking Omega 3, but I have also heard a lot of buzz about the benefits of Flax Seed. Does anyone know if one is better than the other?
    From the posted response it seems both have different benefits. Is it ok to take both supplements at the same time?

    1. Dr.Qutub

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